Supersonic Sky Diving with SolidWorks Simulation

I have been reading about Felix Baumgartner’s attempt on the world skydiving altitude record, held for the last 50 years by Joseph Kittinger.  Felix plans to jump from a gondola attached to a helium balloon at 120,000ft (or 36,500 meters), and the big question no one is sure about is if he will go supersonic.  Personally I think the big question is why.  SolidWorks can’t answer the why, but it can shed light of the question of supersonic sky diving.  The trick to all analysis is the KISS principle (Keep It Simple Stupid), so let’s start with a bit of school yard physics and ignore air resistance and assume a zero initial velocity.  These equations of motion then simplify to give us a solution to Felix’s velocity and altitude;

Equation

Looking at the first 40 seconds of Felix’s jump, in table 1 without air resistance, we can see that he builds up a pretty impressive velocity and quickly breaks the sound barrier.  Now the speed of sound changes with altitude, but as the sky diver falls lower the air resistance increases.  So what comes first the sound barrier or the sky diver's terminal velocity?

Time

Velocity (m/s)

Altitude

Approx speed of Sound (m/s)

Comments

0

0

36,500

310.1

 

10

98.1

36,086

310.1

 

15

147.15

35,472

 

Subsonic flow

20

196.2

34,614

306.5

 

25

245.25

33,510

 

 

30

294.3

32,162

303.0

Transonic flows ?

32.5

318.8

31,395

 

 

35

343.35

30,567

 

Supersonic flow

40

392.4

28,728

300.4

 

Let’s take Jimmy from the beer can conundrum and slap on a pressure helmet and a parachute (yes I know he looks like Rocket Man from the 1950s but humor me please) and put him to the test.  The drag experienced by Jimmy will be influenced by his position, so lets assume a normal stable belly down position (fig1).  Once more I ask you to bear with me as I am not a skydiver, so the position may be a bit off.

Skydiver1

Figure 1                                Stable ‘Belly Down’ Sky Diver

As Jimmy falls he will experience two opposing forces;

An accelerating force    Fg = mg

And a retarding drag    Fd = Cd 1/2ρV2A

So the question is would Jimmy reach the speed of sound?  It’s time to fire up SolidWorks Flow Simulation and do a quick calculation. Let’s look at the airflow around Jimmy after 25 seconds of free fall.  At this time ignoring the drag Jimmy should be still be sub sonic, but we can see from the results that local areas of supersonic flow are developed as the flow accelerates around Jimmy.  After 25 seconds of free fall (assuming that Jimmy and kit weighs in at 100kg) our force balance looks like;

An accelerating force    Fg = 981N

And a retarding drag    Fd = 215N

So Jimmy is still accelerating.

Freefall

Freefall2

Now let’s look at Jimmy after 32.5 seconds of free fall when our simple calculation estimates that Jimmy would be going supersonic.

Freefall3

Freefall4

Ignoring the effects of drag on Jimmy’s freefall velocity predicts an ever increasing Mach number. But after three or so runs at different velocities and altitudes we have enough data to estimate the effect of the air resistance on the free fall velocity.

Chart

With the data from SolidWorks Flow Simulation we can predict that the estimated maximum velocity of Jimmy’s free fall stays below the speed of sound.  Jimmy would be able to considerably increase his freefall velocity if he adopted a ‘head down’ position, but that calculation is for another day.

So the next time you decide to break a speed record check your physics first with SolidWorks Simulation.

 

Stephen Endersby

Stephen Endersby

Product Manager at SolidWorks
  • http://atiintegration.com/ Jenn @ Applied Technology Integration

    This would be a great learning opportunity inside a high school physics classroom. Great post!

  • http://profile.typepad.com/d107774807763228429 egyptian dreamer

    i hoped to simulate the other ( ‘head down’ position) to decrease the fluid resistance by modifying the geometry and the C.G. of the body– at that time i think it will reach 1.2 Mach ,,,,, (Mohammed Abusamra – CSWA)

  • http://profile.typepad.com/dsloop D E Sloop

    Great use of Solidworks! I’m not very smart when it comes to physics, but studying the flow and looking at the numbers all made it make sense.

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