The SOLIDWORKS Blog http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog Fri, 23 Jun 2017 13:05:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 How Does Home Licensing for SOLIDWORKS Work? http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/home-licensing-solidworks-work.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/home-licensing-solidworks-work.html#respond Fri, 23 Jun 2017 13:05:30 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32755
Learn how you can use your SOLIDWORKS license - whether it's perpetual or term - on the go or at home.

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SOLIDWORKS

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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SOLIDWORKS users have long enjoyed the ability to use their software from both their home/mobile and work offices. How is this accomplished without running afoul of the EULA (End User License Agreement), which only permits one license enabled on any one computer at any one time?

In our previous two blog posts we examined perpetual licenses (Standalone and SNL) and term licenses. Let’s first look at standalone licenses. Standalone licenses are intended for an individual user of SOLIDWORKS or related product. It uses an activation process to enable your license to operate after installation. Once the software is activated on a computer, it remains permanently enabled until such time as you choose to deactivate it.

Standalone/perpetual licenses with subscription service for an individual user as displayed inside the application.

 

If you would like to run SOLIDWORKS on another computer, you must first deactivate (using “Help – Deactivate Licenses”) the computer holding your SOLIDWORKS license. The Activate/Deactivate function inside the software allows you to install SOLIDWORKS on as many computers as you wish – ensuring only one computer is operational with SOLIDWORKS at any one time.

Standalone licenses are activated/deactivated under the Help menu in SOLIDWORKS allowing you to run the software on multiple computers.

Users can borrow or hold a license/s for up to 30 days.

SNL license usage showing five total licenses, three of which are in-use, one license borrowed, and one license free.

 

SNL, or network licenses (sometimes referred to as “floating” licenses), also uses an activation process but only for the server, which monitors concurrent license usage. The individual clients running SOLIDWORKS or a related product or add-in retrieve a license each time the software is started, and return the license each time it is closed so that another user can use it. SNL clients can “borrow” a license temporarily for up to 30 days, after which time if the license has not been returned, the server will automatically do so. The status of license usage can be checked at any time. Any borrowed licenses will also display in this pane.

Home/mobile use is of course possible for term licenses as well. Term licenses, from an installation and entitlement perspective, behave in the same exact manner as standalone licenses, i.e., license access is granted through the activate/deactivate process. If a user would like to run a term license on another computer, the license must first be freed up using Deactivate license under the Help menu as described earlier.

This concludes our blog series about licensing with SOLIDWORKS. If you would like to see other articles related to this topic, please comment below and we’ll consider it in a future topic.

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SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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Visualize 2018 Beta is Here! http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/visualize-2018-beta.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/visualize-2018-beta.html#respond Thu, 22 Jun 2017 12:00:34 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32832
Find out about all the new features, improvements and enhancements that are upcoming in SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2018 that will bring your product designs to life better and faster than ever before.

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Brian Hillner

Brian Hillner

Brian Hillner is the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager.

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As you prepare for a summer of fun in the sun, there will likely be a rain shower or two…or several depending on where you live. What to do to fill that time? Give SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2018 Beta a try!

Do you have SOLIDWORKS CAD but haven’t downloaded your complimentary Visualize Standard* seat yet? Now’s the perfect time to get started and explore Visualize 2018 Beta.

We’ve added loads of new features to keep you ahead of the curve and ahead of your competition. We’ve also refreshed the user interface and simplified the picks & clicks to make your lives easier. Read on to see a small glimpse of what’s new in Visualize 2018 and helpful links to get started with 2018 Beta today!

REFRESHED THE USER INTERFACE DESIGN

The biggest, and likely first new feature you will see, is an updated look for Visualize 2018. Our goal was sleek, simple and clean. This new look and feel brings Visualize into the modern era, while making it easier to use at the same time. There’s also a way to switch to between two preset themes, but you’ll have to find that one out for yourself. Gotta leave something for you to explore.

CREATE VIRTUAL REALITY CONTENT

Have a VR headset and wish you could teleport yourself into your Visualize project? Well wish no more! Visualize 2018 allows you to create ‘Spherical’ cameras which render out a single flattened-spherical image. This image can then be converted to use with any VR headset (even a $15 Google Cardboard!). With this new Spherical camera enabled, you can create proper stereo (left eye, right eye) as well. But the coolest part about this new feature is you can also create animations for VR with this new Spherical camera! Give it a whirl and give us your Beta feedback so we can improve this workflow for our major 2018 release this October. (Visualize Professional only)

NEW LIGHTS EVEN EASIER WAY TO PLACE THEM

Have you struggled with placing your lights in your scene? Or wanted to move your light to illuminate an exact spot on your model? Or maybe you design interior spaces and want your renders to finish at a fraction of the time? Then this one’s definitely for you. We’ve introduced a new way to instantly place lights in your scene, just by clicking on the model where you want the light to illuminate. This comes with new ‘Area’ light types (sphere, plane, tube, disc) to help recreate any real-world lighting environment. They are much easier to set up and control the lighting of your scene. It’s very similar to the ‘emissive plane lighting technique’ that many of you know very well. Here’s the real kicker…these new Area lights work in Fast mode! Before only Accurate mode supported emissive lighting. Which means you can now use Fast mode for your interior scenes! Have fun with this one. (Visualize Professional only)

There’s loads of new features, improvements and enhancements in Visualize 2018 Beta…too many to list here. Experience the awesomeness for yourself right now!

Check out the links below to get started today! Use your SOLIDWORKS login to gain access to these links:

For a longer list of top new features in Visualize 2018 Beta click here (you will need to login to access this page).

Don’t forget to follow SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager @bhillner on twitter for product news and updates, and share your SOLIDWORKS Visualize creations on social media with #swvisualize and #gettinvizzy!

More Resources to get started with SOLIDWORKS Visualize:

DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE SEAT OF SOLIDWORKS VISUALIZE right now to bring your products to market faster than ever before.

WATCH TWO WEBINARS on SOLIDWORKS Visualize and its many benefits to up your render game to a whole new level.

*SOLIDWORKS CAD Professional & Premium users on active Subscription receive the matching number of complimentary Visualize Standard seats. Learn more here.

 

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Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner is the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager.

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The Whirlwind Engineering History of the Bicycle http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/whirlwind-engineering-history-bicycle.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/whirlwind-engineering-history-bicycle.html#respond Tue, 20 Jun 2017 13:03:19 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31260 The whirlwind engineering history of the bicycle 3
Stridewalkers, Boneshakers, Penny Farthings. The bicycle has been privy to some curious iterations. Fetch your helmet, here’s a whistle-stop tour of the bike’s 220-year history. Who needs nuclear power when you’ve got a bicycle? That’s what the nation’s listeners of

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SOLIDWORKS UK

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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The whirlwind engineering history of the bicycle 3

Stridewalkers, Boneshakers, Penny Farthings. The bicycle has been privy to some curious iterations. Fetch your helmet, here’s a whistle-stop tour of the bike’s 220-year history.

Who needs nuclear power when you’ve got a bicycle?

That’s what the nation’s listeners of UK Radio 4 programme You & Yours decreed in 2005 when they voted the bicycle as the most significant technological innovation since 1800. In winning the poll – emphatically – the humble bike also batted away competition from the computer, radio, the internet, communications satellites, internal combustion engines and the germ theory of infection. Not bad.

But what’s so special about two wheels, a frame and a saddle?

Well, it turns out there’s rather more to it than that. So much so that today’s performance bikes are as much the work of F1 engineers as bike manufacturers. Yep, the bike’s wheels have rolled an awfully long way since the clunky wooden specimens of the eighteenth century.  Today the world’s one billion bikes represent the most efficient vehicle the world has ever seen.

Behold its history.


1817: The world’s first bike?

Step forward German inventor Karl Drais, who in 1817 patented the design for his Laufmaschine (translation: running machine). Riders straddled a wooden frame and – in the absence of pedals and chain propulsion – pushed their feet along the ground to get the wheels moving. Hence the distinctly sci-fi sounding nickname: Stridewalker.

The whirlwind engineering history of the bicycle 1

1839: The birth of pedal power

Kirkpatrick MacMillan, a Scottish blacksmith, makes what would become the most influential addition to the story of the bicycle: a mechanical crank-drive system attached to the rear wheel. Hello pedals, goodbye scuffed shoe soles.


1863: The Boneshaker becomes the world’s first mass-produced bicycle

Building on MacMillan’s crank-drive innovation, Pierre Michaux (another blacksmith) and his son Ernest developed the world’s first mass-produced bicycle in 1863. It was called the velocipede and had flanged wheels that endowed it with the unique ability to ride along rail tracks. Hmm. Back on the cobbled streets of the nineteenth century, the wooden-rimmed wheels were particularly unforgiving – earning Michaux’s bicycle the nickname ‘Boneshaker’.

The whirlwind engineering history of the bicycle 2

Image Courtesy of OldBike.eu

 

1870: The birth of the penny-farthing

It might have looked ridiculous, but the Penny-Farthing was built to serve a very practical need: the need for speed. Without gearing, the only way to increase bicycle speed was to increase the size of the wheel attached to the pedals – and the enhanced availability of steel meant large wheels were a simple engineering challenge. Unfortunately, penny-farthings were incredibly difficult to mount, much less ride, and became the preserve of the brave, the skilful and the foolish.


1879: The birth of modern bicycles

During the late 1870s a number of inventors developed an alternative to the penny-farthing, marketed as the safety bicycle for obvious reasons. With a chain drive that allowed the rider to sit at the centre of the frame, a height that made it easy for riders to reach the ground and wheels that were broadly the same size, the safety bicycle fuelled the surge of bicycle popularity in the 1890s and the birth of companies such as Raleigh and Schwinn. The same design is used to this day. Yep, for the last 140 years all we’ve been doing is tweaking a design classic.
1888: Watch where you tread

Scottish veterinary surgeon and inventor John Dunlop is the first to add pneumatic tyres to a bike while successfully attempting to make his son’s tricycle safer. He then brought his innovation to cycle racing and it was quickly adopted. The following fifty years was a time of major innovation in terms of gearing, brakes and derailleurs.


1940: Changing gear gets simple

Italian bicycle component manufacturer par excellence Campagnolo invent a derailleur called the cambio corsa. It’s revolutionary. Instead of stopping and flipping their rear wheel to change gear, riders can simply flick a rod located above the rear wheel.


1986: The clamour for carbon

The 1980s were the dawn of an era of serious engineering innovation for bikes. Suddenly the everyday consumer could purchase BMXs, mountain bikes, road bikes, commuter bikes, elite racing bikes, tandems and more. One of the most major innovations of the 80s comes when manufacturer Look produce a racing bike with a carbon fibre frame. Ridden by Greg LeMond, Look’s KG86 wins the 1986 Tour de France.

The whirlwind engineering history of the bicycle 3

Image Courtesy of Cycling Weekly

1990: The UCI define what a bicycle is

UCI, the governing body of cycling, define what a bicycle is. All race bikes must abide these parameters and bicycle engineers everywhere have a strict set of limitations within which to innovate.


What’s the future of bikes?

The UCI parameters mean that the basic design of bicycles for competitive races isn’t going to change anytime soon. That doesn’t mean visionaries can’t have their fun with concept bikes and commuter bikes. Oh and lest we forget the revolutionary trikes that Van Raam have developed in SOLIDWORKS for those with mobility issues and their carers.

>> How SOLIDWORKS is assisting Van Raam’s bike builds

>> Headkayse Improves Cyclist Safety with Folding Helmet

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SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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Simplify the Material Selection Process When 3D Printing Plastic Parts http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/simplify-material-selection-process-3d-printing-plastic-parts.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/simplify-material-selection-process-3d-printing-plastic-parts.html#respond Mon, 19 Jun 2017 13:27:02 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32766
Learn the best way to choose which plastic material to use when 3D printing your parts.

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Eric Utley

Eric Utley

Eric is a 3D printing applications engineer at Proto Labs

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Of the 114,000 thousand plastics recognized by the Society of Plastics Engineers, roughly 600 are used in 3D printing processes. 3D printing materials are often referred to by their traditional names like ABS, nylon, polypropolene, etc., but be aware that many 3D-printed materials only mimic true thermoplastics. For example, a 3D-printed part in ABS-like material will have similar, but not identical, properties to a molded ABS part.

Stereolithography machines can build parts from a number of thermoplastic-like materials.

 

In this post, we’ll cover common 3D printing materials used to prototype plastic part designs. Although not an exhaustive analysis, these guidelines should help you narrow down your material options so that you only need to hunt down a couple data sheets for side-by-side comparison.

Polycarbonate-Like Materials

Accura 5530 material is transparent in color, temperature tolerant, and water resistant. It’s also resistant to automotive fluids making it suitable for under-the-hood and electrical applications. Secondary operations are required to achieve transparency and the final part will still retain a slight amber hue.

Accura 60 supports fine details while providing good stiffness in parts. Common applications include durable prototypes for automotive, consumer electronics and lighting components, as well as medical instruments. Accura 60 has a high tensile strength and modulus making this a good choice to replace polycarbonate (PC) when heat resistance is not critical.

ABS-Like Materials

RenShape 7820 has high strength and good dimensional stability. The material is black and commonly used in automotive parts, consumer packaging, electrical housings and toys due to its impact resistance and ease of secondary finishing that provides the appearance of production quality.

Somos Watershed XC 11122 is strong, durable, water-resistant material. It’s nearly colorless and mimics a clear engineered-grade plastic. Watershed’s high clarity makes it a perfect material for prototyping lenses, flow-visualization models and micro-fluidic parts. Post-build polishing will be required to get the material completely clear.

Polypropylene-Like Materials

Xtreme White 200 is comparable to both a polypropylene and ABS thermoplastic in that it offers strength and durability, lending itself well to application that require snap-fit features. Note that Xtreme White 200 has relatively low heat deflection.

DSM Somos 9120 is translucent in appearance, providing excellent resolution, and fine detail. You may want to consider Somos 9120 for parts with thin walls or small holes. The material is also one of the more flexible SL materials. Potential applications include automotive components, electrical housings, and medical devices.

Nylon Materials

PA 850 is similar to molded Nylon 11. This tough bioplastic is an excellent choice for parts requiring a living hinge and offers one of the highest elongation break thresholds in the nylon family. It produces a smooth surface finish, and good part detail. Another nice benefit is its superb chemical resistance and low water absorption—great for functional prototyping.

ALM PA 650 is Nylon 12, so it’s both stiff and tough. It presents a slightly rougher surface than other nylons, but offers high impact and temperature resistance, is very durable, and remains stable under a range of environmental conditions. It also has a low coefficient of friction, making it suitable for many types of gears and bearings.

Elastomers

A new development in 3D printing is the use of elastomeric materials, which has coincided with the introduction technology capable of 3D printing parts with multiple material properties such as colors and durometers. 3D-printed elastomeric parts may not have the durability to be used in end-use applications, but they can be a valuable development tool since you can produce low-volumes of parts without investing thousands into tooling in the prototyping phase.

Agilus 30 is a digital photopolymer used in the PolyJet 3D printing process. It’s unique in that it can take on multiple properties such as durometers and colors. And, it can combine those properties into a single build. This technology is frequently leveraged for overmold prototyping as well as finding the optimal durometer for an elastomeric part design.

Powder-based thermoplastic urethanes are also relatively new to the scene. The material is used in SLS machines and offers abrasion and tear resistance making it suitable for functional prototyping. The SLS TPU we offer at Proto Labs has a durometer of 70A, but additional durometers are on the market.

3D Printing Materials Decision Tree
Now that we have that out of the way. This chart will also serve as a nice quick-reference, so you can easily find the materials that align with your application’s requirements.

Conclusion

Among the smooth thermoset resins, durable nylons, and flexible elastomers, there is a 3D printing material out there that aligns with your product development requirements. Even though materials do not exactly match the characteristics of those used in traditional production methods like injection molding, they’re more than suitable for prototyping whether that be for form and fit or functional testing, and in some cases end-use parts.

If you want a more comprehensive look at 3D printing materials—both plastics and metals—I recommend reading through our 3D printing materials white paper. It includes a more detailed analysis of mechanical properties and is a great reference to sort through your 3D printing material options.

 

 

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Eric Utley
Eric Utley
Eric is a 3D printing applications engineer at Proto Labs

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Which is Right for You: Standalone or Floating License? http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/right-standalone-floating-license.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/right-standalone-floating-license.html#respond Fri, 16 Jun 2017 14:12:23 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32676
Learn more about the two choices you have when you choose perpetual licensing from SOLIDWORKS – which are Standalone and SNL (SolidNetWork Licenses).

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SOLIDWORKS

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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In our last blog article, we examined the difference between perpetual and term licenses and how you might leverage both license types to meet all your license entitlement needs. We also looked at SOLIDWORKS commitment to offer and support perpetual licenses well into the foreseeable future. Today we will examine the two choices within perpetual licensing from SOLIDWORKS – which are Standalone and SNL (SolidNetWork Licenses).

Standalone licenses, as the name implies, are intended for an individual user of SOLIDWORKS or any related product such as Simulation, Composer or Electrical. It uses an “Activate/Deactivate” mechanism to entitle the software for use after installation, or to move the license entitlement to another device such as a home, laptop or mobile computer or a new user all while ensuring only one license is in use at any one time. Activation is a onetime process which requires that you have internet or email access to complete the process. Once activated, you do not need to be online to use your software.

Product activation after installation for Standalone licenses.

Like fuel-efficient cars or appliances, SNL or “floating” licenses allow you to stretch your investment across your community of users. SNL uses a proven and reliable client/server distributed licensing approach, where access to the software is granted by a license server installed on your network that contains all of your entitlements. When a user starts SOLIDWORKS or any related product or Add-in, it checks with the server to see if licenses are either in-use or available. Once a user closes SOLIDWORKS or related product or Add-in, the license is immediately released back to the server for another user to use. Typically with SNL, administrators will install the software for every potential user, knowing that SNL will monitor concurrent usage to ensure that the number of concurrent users does not exceed the number of purchased licenses.

There are three important provisions that govern and limit the “floating” nature of SNL licenses:

  1.  The network on which the SNL is installed may only serve licenses to client machines of the same legal corporate entity.
  2.  Clients accessing the SNL license server must be located in the same global territory (defined below) as the server.
  3.  A minimum of one SNL server license is required for each country in which there are client users.

The global territories permitting license sharing from SNLs are: the Americas, Europe, Japan, and Asia-Pacific. For example, SNLs installed and managed on a server in the United States may be accessed by users of the same company in Brazil and Mexico as long as one SNL was acquired in Brazil and another SNL was acquired in Mexico (for a total of three SNLs – US, Brazil, Mexico). Users in China would not be allowed to access licenses from a server in the United States, and vice versa, even if the users are in the same company as each global territory must have its own SNL and pool of licenses.

SolidNetWork licenses can be shared by users of the same legal entity, in the same global territory, provided an SNL is purchased for each country in which there are clients/users.

Global network licenses, often called “follow the sun licensing,” or Regional network licenses, can be purchased that removes global territory and country restrictions to varying degrees, however, these licenses may cost extra and must comply with the requirement that all users be of the same legal/corporate entity.  Your local Value Added Reseller can provide more information and put you in touch with a SOLIDWORKS sales representative about these specialized licensing options.

Nearly every software title from SOLIDWORKS can be put onto SNL. For example, SOLIDWORKS, Simulation, Flow Simulation, Electrical, Composer, Inspection, MBD, PCB, Plastics, etc. – can all be added to SNL and shared among users.

Most SOLIDWORKS software titles can be added to an SNL and shared among users.

SNL and standalone licenses can be mixed/matched. For example, you could have five standalone licenses of SOLIDWORKS Standard dedicated to your all day/every day CAD users. Those same standalone licenses could access via SNL a pool of Simulation, Composer, Electrical – even SOLIDWORKS Premium (CAD) licenses.

Network licenses and its subscription cost the same as standalone licenses. Standalone licenses are also upgradable to SNL. There is, however, a fee for purchasing each SNL or converting from standalone to SNL that varies in price across geographic regions. It’s easy to see – SNL licenses offer tremendous value, variation, and flexibility, especially when combined with standalone and term licenses discussed in our last blog post. In our next blog post, we’ll examine how home/mobile use is accomplished.

You can find additional information on SOLIDWORKS licensing and activation options here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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SOLIDWORKS MBD How-To Video Series (Part 2): How to Organize 3D Annotations http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/solidworks-mbd-video-series-part-2-organize-3d-annotations.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/solidworks-mbd-video-series-part-2-organize-3d-annotations.html#respond Thu, 15 Jun 2017 12:59:23 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32690
Learn how to organize 3D annotations with SOLIDWORKS Model-Based Definition with this continuation of our MBD How-to Video Series.

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Oboe Wu

Oboe Wu

Product portfolio manager of SOLIDWORKS MBD, passionate about smart manufacturing opportunities, Keen listener to customer challenges, Sharp problem solver with 20 years of experiences in engineering, Sleepless father trying best to take care of a baby daughter.

The post SOLIDWORKS MBD How-To Video Series (Part 2): How to Organize 3D Annotations appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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In Part 1 of this MBD How-to Video Series, we illustrated several techniques to define 3D annotations using SOLIDWORKS MBD. For example,

  • Set an overall detailing standard
  • Define location or size dimensions per the Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T) schemes
  • Create annotations to continuous features
  • Call out annotations to intersection geometries
  • Annotate patterns
  • Modify dimension and tolerance styles.

Defining annotations is the foundation of model-based workflows, but it’s not enough. As illustrated in a previous blog post, MBD Implementation Dos and Don’ts: Organize and Present 3D PMI Clearly, it’s vital to make your MBD data consumable and actionable because people do judge a book by its cover. Hence comes Part 2 of this How-To tutorial video series.

In this video, Chris Pagliarini illustrated several widely used tools to present MBD data:

  • Adjust text scale
  • Assign callouts to annotation views.
  • Capture 3D views for various use cases
  • Set different display styles.
  • Organize notes, tables and statements in 2D Notes Area
  • Cut section views.

 

These techniques will not only make your SOLIDWORKS MBD data more presentable, they will also lay out a solid foundation to 3D PDF publishing. More details will be covered in Parts 3 and 4 of this video series later. Please stay tuned.

I hope you enjoyed this video. Please share your feedback in the comment area below. To learn more about SOLIDWORKS MBD, please watch this 22-minute webcast below and visit the SOLIDWORKS MBD product page.

Author information

Oboe Wu
Oboe Wu
Product portfolio manager of SOLIDWORKS MBD, passionate about smart manufacturing opportunities, Keen listener to customer challenges, Sharp problem solver with 20 years of experiences in engineering, Sleepless father trying best to take care of a baby daughter.

The post SOLIDWORKS MBD How-To Video Series (Part 2): How to Organize 3D Annotations appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Fogg Filler Designs Complex Machines with SOLIDWORKS http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/fogg-filler-designs-complex-machines-solidworks.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/fogg-filler-designs-complex-machines-solidworks.html#respond Wed, 14 Jun 2017 15:16:49 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32743
By standardizing on SOLIDWORKS Solutions, Fogg Filler has cut extensive time out of their production cycle allowing them to focus on creating more innovative designs.

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Josie Morales

Josie Morales

Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

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Are you always looking for the best tools to make you and your company work faster and more efficiently? With less time spent on the day-to-day tasks, you can focus more on inventing new technologies and creating better designs. Let’s take a look at Fogg Filler’s story, which is about just that, saving time on assembly and prototype development with SOLIDWORKS allowed its designers to focus on creating more innovative and efficient designs.

A leading innovator in the filling industry, Fogg Filler manufactures some of the best-performing rotary filling systems available, with speeds that can exceed 1,000 bottles per minute. Considered an industry leader, Fogg Filler is always looking to improve performance and capabilities of its products.

The filling machinery market has dramatically changed in recent years and in order to keep up with the changing the market, Fogg Filler knew it had to upgrade from its existing AutoCAD® 2D design tools to a 3D design platform that could support the increasing demands and allow them to work faster and more efficiently.

After evaluating multiple 3D CAD software products, Fogg Filler chose SOLIDWORKS Professional and SOLIDWORKS Premium because it supports large assembly design and includes motion simulation tools. According to Fogg Filler Owner, Ben Fogg, “We believed that SOLIDWORKS represented the best available design solution.” Needless to say, it didn’t take Fogg Filler long to standardize on SOLIDWORKS solutions.

With SOLIDWORKS and the company’s state-of-the-art machine shop, engineers can now create prototypes in 24 hours instead of the weeks that prototyping used to take. This efficiency improvement— combined with SOLIDWORKS tools for simulating motion, stress loads, and fluid flows—enables Fogg Filler to spend more time on innovative concepts at a much lower cost.

With the increased efficiency and quality provided by SOLIDWORKS, Fogg Filler can spend more time developing industry innovations, inventing new applications for its machines, and expanding into additional markets.

Read the full case study here, then learn how packaging machines and industrial equipment design are critical for delivering fresh, cold beer to your glass.

Author information

Josie Morales
Josie Morales
Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

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An Introduction to Designing for Metal 3D Printing http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/introduction-designing-metal-3d-printing.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/introduction-designing-metal-3d-printing.html#respond Mon, 12 Jun 2017 12:00:45 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32735
Learn more about how to design parts for metal 3D printing technologies, such as direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), selective laser melting (SLM), and electron beam melting (EBM).

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Eric Utley

Eric Utley

Eric is a 3D printing applications engineer at Proto Labs

The post An Introduction to Designing for Metal 3D Printing appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Metal 3D printing is not intended to replace traditional metal manufacturing processes. Rather, it’s a manufacturing tool that opens up new possibilities for product designers. There are many metal 3D printing technologies out there like direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), selective laser melting (SLM), electron beam melting (EBM). Each are fairly similar in how they build parts from atomized metal powders.

Parts can be built from powdered aluminum, Inconel, titanium, stainless steel, cobalt chrome, and more. The powder has the same chemical composition as the final part, since the process does not require any binding agents or additives. It’s essentially a microwelding process that results in a fully dense metal part with the mechanical strength and fatigue characteristics similar to a machined part.

Common uses of metal 3D printing include reducing multi-component assemblies into a single part and lightweighting designs with hollow features and internal channels. The possibilities may seem limitless but there are a few principles that you can follow to ensure quality results.

Basic Design Considerations for Metal 3D Printing

When designing for metal 3D printing it’s important to be aware that certain features are prone to warping or in-build curl if not supported. This is due to the internal stresses created by the rapid heating and cooling of the material during production. The design of support structures isn’t something you as a designer necessarily need to be too concerned with, but it’s good to know that some shapes are exceptionally difficult to build, and making slight alterations to your part design can be an easy way to not only improve quality, but also reduce manufacturing costs.

Tolerances. High-resolution DMLS at Proto Labs builds at a layer thickness of 0.0008 in. (0.02 mm) and can produce quite accurate parts, with tolerances to +/- 0.003 in. (0.076 mm), part features as small as 0.006 in. (0.152 mm), and surface finishes similar to that of a sand casting.

Wall thickness. At Proto Labs, our rule of thumb is walls below 0.040 in. (1 mm) must maintain a wall height-to-thickness ratio of less than 40:1. On the other hand, if walls are thick, it can be an inefficient use of material and build time leading to higher manufacturing costs. We prefer to hollow thick features out with a honeycomb or lattice structure in order to reduce material costs and processing time while preserving structural integrity.

Design Tips for Common Features

Self-Supporting Angles. A self-supporting angle describes the feature’s angle relative to the build plate. The lower the angle, the less the likely it is to support itself. Each material will perform slightly differently, but the general rule of thumb is to avoid designing a self-supporting feature that is less than 45 degrees. As you can see in the picture below, as the angle decreases, the features downward facing surface becomes rougher and eventually the part will fail if the angle is reduced too far.

Overhangs. Overhangs differ from self-supporting angles in that they are abrupt changes in a part’s geometry. DMLS is fairly limited in its support of overhangs when compared to other 3D printing technologies. At Proto Labs, any design with an overhang greater than 0.020 in. (0.5mm) will require additional support to prevent damage to the part. When designing overhangs it’s wise to err on the side of caution as large overhangs can lead to reduction in a part’s detail and worse, lead to the whole build crashing.

 


Channels and Holes. Internal channels and holes are one of the primary benefits of DMLS since they are impossible with conventional metal manufacturing methods. Conformal channels provide even cooling throughout a part and aid in reducing a component’s weight. We recommended that channels do not exceed a diameter of 0.30 in. (8mm). Similar to unsupported structures, the downward facing surfaces will start to distort as hole or channel width increases. A common workaround is to design channels with a tear drop or diamond shape. Channels that follow these shapes will make for a more uniform surface finish within the channel and allow you to maximize the channel’s diameter.

Bridges. A bridge is any flat down-facing surface that is supported by 2 or more features. The minimum allowable unsupported distance for our DMLS process is 0.080 in. In relation to other 3D printing technologies, this distance is relatively short due to the stresses of the rapid heating and cooling. In the picture below, you will see how the bridge pulls in the supporting structures as the unsupported distance increases. Parts that exceed this recommended limit will have poor quality on the downward facing surfaces and not be structurally sound.

Learning More About Metal 3D Printing

If you would want to learn more about how to design for metal 3D printing, check out our webinar “Designing for Metal 3D Printing.” You’ll find more details and tips on how to optimize your part design for metal 3D printing, select the right material, and reduce multi-part assemblies.

 

Author information

Eric Utley
Eric Utley
Eric is a 3D printing applications engineer at Proto Labs

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Which is Right For You, Perpetual or Term Licenses? http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/right-perpetual-term-licenses.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/right-perpetual-term-licenses.html#respond Fri, 09 Jun 2017 13:24:54 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32657
SOLIDWORKS has different licensing options designed to meet the varying needs of our customers and users. In the software industry, licensing generally falls into one of two categories; perpetual licenses (i.e. purchase to own, with optional subscription service) and term

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SOLIDWORKS

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Which is Right For You, Perpetual or Term Licenses? appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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SOLIDWORKS has different licensing options designed to meet the varying needs of our customers and users. In the software industry, licensing generally falls into one of two categories; perpetual licenses (i.e. purchase to own, with optional subscription service) and term licenses (i.e. pay as you use, or ‘rent’ the software for a specific period, such as 90 or 360 days). SOLIDWORKS has offerings in both of these categories and customers can use either or both of these options depending on their needs.

Standalone/perpetual licenses with subscription service for an individual user as displayed in Help – Show Licenses inside the application.

 

A perpetual license is far and away the most popular option for SOLIDWORKS customers. A perpetual license, as the name implies, never expires.

Someone who purchased SolidWorks 95 many years ago without subscription support could theoretically run the license in perpetuity, so long as there is a computer and operating system that are available and operational to run the software. A perpetual license with subscription support provides you access to the latest releases and service packs, technical support, Knowledge Base solutions, Customer Portal, MySolidWorks resources, etc. to fully optimize your investment in SOLIDWORKS.

Perpetual licensing with subscription offers the lowest total cost of ownership over the long haul. Customers also have the peace of mind that by outright owning their software (Subject to License Agreement), they are guaranteed that the data and intellectual property that they author will always be accessible and available. Customers choosing perpetual licenses have existing product lines that are continually improved and upgraded, have R&D efforts for new products in the pipeline or under consideration, or have projects or consultancies anticipated well into the future. Funding for engineering software such as SOLIDWORKS usually come from capital expenditure (capex) budgets.

Term licenses by contrast, offer a considerably lower upfront initial investment that is attractive to startups and venture funded companies or where the future or direction of the product, company or service is still not fully determined or realized.

Typical cost comparison for perpetual vs term license in the software industry.

 

Term licenses are often purchased from operating (opex) as opposed to capital budgets and offer the most flexibility to meter up or down the amount of software licenses you need at any moment in time, and have subscription support built directly into the offer.

“Help – Show Licenses” inside the application showing combined perpetual and term licenses for an individual user.

 

Today, term licenses are available for SOLIDWORKS and SOLIDWORKS Simulation (in all countries and all categories; i.e. Standard, Professional and Premium). However more products are under consideration.

Many vendors in the software industry are foregoing perpetual licenses and are only offering term licenses for many of their titles. Examples of this are Adobe and Autodesk, and more recently PTC who has announced they will no longer offer perpetual licenses in some regions including the Americas and Western Europe beginning January 1, 2018.

At SOLIDWORKS we have no plans to stop selling or retire perpetual licenses. We understand that perpetual and term serve different needs, and there is no one-size-fits-all approach for license provisioning that meets all our customers’ needs.

In our next blog post, we will examine Standalone versus Network (SNL or “floating”) licensing options.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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SOLIDWORKS Plastics At The Beach http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/solidworks-plastics-beach.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/solidworks-plastics-beach.html#respond Thu, 08 Jun 2017 13:51:29 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32723
The beach is a great place to reflect on eternal questions, like can my part design be injection molded, and is the resulting part acceptable? With SOLIDWORKS Plastics you won't have to reflect long.

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Stephen Endersby

Stephen Endersby

Product Manager at SolidWorks

The post SOLIDWORKS Plastics At The Beach appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Well summer is just around the corner and my family is chomping at the bit to get down to the beach. Last weekend I cleared out the garage and dug out all our children’s beach gear, buckets, spades, and alike. Which got me thinking, could I a mechanical engineer with minimal plastics training, design a new sandcastle bucket that looks right and can be successfully manufactured? In order to keep the cost down, I decided that my sandcastle will be manufactured using the injection molding process. Creating the geometry in SOLIDWORKS is a breeze, a few extrudes, some patterns, fillets, a shell feature and I am good to go. Lastly, by running a draft analysis I know that the geometry can be ejected from the mold.

But as every engineer knows, the geometry is only half the story. The big questions are, can this part design be injection molded, and is the resulting part acceptable? By using SOLIDWORKS Plastics we can simulate the injection molding manufacturing process to ensure that not only is the part design moldable, and that the resulting part is fit for sale.

The first set of questions I need answered by SOLIDWORKS Plastics are “Is my part design capable of being injection molded, and where do I place my gate location?”. The least expensive form of injection molding uses a cold runner system with the gate located on the parting line. So I now have a new question, “Do I gate from the short side of the sandcastle, or gate from the tall side”? Doing this by trial and error after machining the mold is not an acceptable option, as it is far too expensive of a test procedure. By using SOLIDWORKS Plastics, I can run multiple analyses as my testing method and all it costs me is CPU time and not much else after that.

My first test has the gate located on the short side, shown by the green arrow in the image below. SOLIDWORKS Plastics reports a Fill Time of 9.5 seconds and required Injection Pressure of 74.2 MPa. This part design has a large part volume, so the lengthy fill time is reasonable and the injection pressure is well within most machine maximum injection pressure capabilities of 200 MPa. My first question regarding the moldability has been answered. Yes, my part design can be molded. Although, at first glance the results look good, there is an issue with my gate location on the short side. SOLIDWORKS Plastics predicts a large and visible Weld Line on the tall side of the part, shown below by the red arrows.

The reduction in structural integrity caused by the Weld Line is not my concern, as this is a beach toy and will not be supporting extensive loads. What does concern me is our company primarily uses metallic-flake colorant in our plastic materials, and metallic flake noticeably gathers along Weld Lines and is an aesthetic blemish on the molded part surface.

In my second analysis, I gated the part from the tall side of the sandcastle. The Fill Time and Injection pressures are similar, and now the Weld Line results show two weld lines in less noticeable locations. They are much smaller than original weld line and are spaced further apart. So gating from the tall side is my best option.

I now have the gate location squared away, what kind of runner design and mold design should I use for production? A quick chat with a friend suggests a four cavity layout with an “H-Type” runner system would be a good starting point. Once again using SOLIDWORKS Plastics, I can simulate the manufacturing process so I can validate the moldability of my part design. Now let’s make sure my “H-Type” runner design is my best option before cutting any metal and incurring unnecessary expenses.

Due to the height of the sandcastle design, using a sprue inlet diameter of 5.0 mm and a standard sprue draft angle of 3.0 degrees results in a sprue outlet diameter of 31 millimeters. The 31 mm diameter runner will take about seven minutes to cool down sufficiently to eject from the mold. Even I know a seven minute cycle time is no good for production. Once again SOLIDWORKS Plastics is guiding me towards a better manufacturing process for my part design. I make the decision to not use a parting line runner system for this mold layout.

The first step to reduce the sprue height is to gate from the top of the sandcastle by using a “three plate, cold drop, center gate”.  This is a similar approach to how 5 gallon buckets are injection molded, except those use a much more expensive hot runner system. The results from this center gate analysis shows that that there are no substantial weld lines to be seen when gated from the top face.  Since the center gate on the top face is the optimal gate location, this will be the runner design used to injection mold the highest quality part, using the most cost effective design.

In plastic part design, the geometry is only half the story. SOLIDWORKS Plastics should be used throughout your design process to validate your part design, runner design, and mold design saving you both time and money.

 

Author information

Stephen Endersby
Stephen Endersby
Product Manager at SolidWorks

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Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery: Lautering and Sparging http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/brewing-electricity-solidworks-brewery-lautering-sparging.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/brewing-electricity-solidworks-brewery-lautering-sparging.html#respond Wed, 07 Jun 2017 13:00:00 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32666
The electrical brew team is saving time lautering and sparging brewing process. Read the post to learn how you too can save time on the electrical design process.

Author information

JP Emanuele

JP Emanuele

JP is a Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, North America.

The post Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery: Lautering and Sparging appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Up to this point, our grains have been soaking in water that has been set to the perfect temperature in order for us to extract as much sugar from the grain as possible. With the slim chance that we left some sugar in with the grain, we need to take a few additional steps – which are known as lautering and sparging.

In large scale operations that you might see at one of the many breweries around North America, mashing, lautering, and sparging are typically performed in separate tanks. But due to the fact that this equipment is for personal use (and has been set up in Earl’s living room), we perform these steps in the same kettle. It’s all about efficiency. This same concept applies when designing our schematics.

One particular feature of SOLIDWORKS Electrical can help improve our efficiency AND our effectiveness during the design process. Project Macros is that feature and it can be extremely powerful. It’s kind of like the old copy-paste option, but way smarter and way faster. We can take a symbol with associated part information and save it off for future use within our current project or in any other project we so choose. We can also copy multiple symbols and all the wires connecting those symbols. To make it even better, we can copy entire sheets or multiple sheets and create a macro out of them as well.

As I mentioned already, (and as you can probably tell) Project Macros is my favorite feature in the software.  We can even take our macros to the next level by incorporating them with the Excel Automation tool as well as the PLC configuration tool – both of which can help us make our designs even faster.

So be sure to check out Episode 4 in our “Brewing with Electricity” mini-series where we conduct the lauter and sparge phase to increase the sugar in our wort and discuss the various methods of symbol creation within SOLIDWORKS Electrical.

If you are still looking for more great information on SOLIDWORKS Electrical including topics such as “Understanding Project Macros,” check out our videos on these more detailed topics at my.solidworks.com – simply search for Electric Brewery.

If you’re a fan of twitter, you can follow me @SWECAD

Author information

JP Emanuele
JP Emanuele
JP is a Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, North America.

The post Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery: Lautering and Sparging appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Learn the basics of SOLIDWORKS Composer http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/learn-basics-solidworks-composer.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/learn-basics-solidworks-composer.html#respond Tue, 06 Jun 2017 20:43:15 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32707
Access the product tutorial videos available only at MySolidWorks and learn how you can maximize the value of 3D CAD data.

Author information

Mohit Daga

Mohit Daga

Mohit is a Senior Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS Composer. Tables Tennis Champion, Vegetarian foodie and avid kickballer!

The post Learn the basics of SOLIDWORKS Composer appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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SOLIDWORKS Composer gives users the tools for faster, easier creation of graphical content that clearly and accurately presents their product – how it works, how to assemble it, how to use it, and how to service it. The intuitive SOLIDWORKS Composer software enables even non-technical users to take their 3D CAD data and develop stunning, up-to-date 2D and 3D content quickly and more cost effectively.

Sometimes, it is just difficult to get started with learning something new! We worked with the SOLIDWORKS support team to come up with 6 of the most widely used and also the most important features for SOLIDWORKS Composer in an effort to remove the roadblocks and concerns our customers have related to get started with the product.

We are pleased to launch this new learning path for SOLIDWORKS Composer to give a general introduction into these widely used features. The learning path will include the following six lessons:

Exploded views in Composer

Exploded views can be created in SOLIDWORKS Composer and are incredibly helpful when trying to show all the components used in an assembly, or for showing how to assemble, disassemble, or repair the assembly. Exploded views can also be used for other purposes such as showing off a design by a marketing team.

Technical Illustrations in Composer

Since vector graphics scale without distorting the image, they are very useful when trying to insert images into other documents, such as a PDF or a Word doc. Vector images also allow for a clean professional look for marketing purposes.

Introduction to Digger

The Digger tool is a patented technology in SOLIDWORKS Composer that allows you to zoom into a part, create detailed views and fade away actors in order to see internal components or mechanisms.

Using the Digger tool allows users to easily create detailed views of interior components of an assembly without having to manually hide actors in the assembly. Additionally, this tool delivers a better understanding of actors and assemblies with its ability to zoom into any specific portion of a part or assembly.

Creating an Animation in Composer

Animations provide an extra visual representation of how an assembly can be put together, taken apart, and shows the order in which parts are added. Animations compliment exploded views incredibly well and help manufacturers and assemblers understand exactly how the components come together. Animations also serve as a great marketing tool, as they can show off the complexities of the design as well as how refined the final product is.

Publishing from Composer

Being able to incorporate SOLIDWORKS Composer files into a Word document or a PDF gives more flexibility to share information with manufacturers and assemblers. Even if a user doesn’t have SOLIDWORKS Composer downloaded on their machine, incorporating an SMG file into a Word document or a PDF can be a way to communicate efficiently using Composer files.

Updating Composer Files

It is common practice to update parts and assemblies, but in a SOLIDWORKS Composer file, it is difficult to make substantial design changes since it is not a native SOLIDWORKS CAD software. However, it is simple to update SOLIDWORKS Composer actors and assemblies. All you have to do is select the components, and then choose “Update”. This relieves the headache of needing to update everything externally in SOLIDWORKS.

Go ahead and take advantage of this great learning opportunity and look at how SOLIDWORKS Composer can add value to your company and your customers by easily incorporating 3D graphics and interactive animation instead of static drawings and text into your technical product communication.

Author information

Mohit Daga
Mohit Daga
Mohit is a Senior Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS Composer. Tables Tennis Champion, Vegetarian foodie and avid kickballer!

The post Learn the basics of SOLIDWORKS Composer appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Visitech: Making Cricket Safer with SOLIDWORKS Simulation http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/visitech-making-cricket-safer-solidworks-simulation.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/visitech-making-cricket-safer-solidworks-simulation.html#respond Tue, 06 Jun 2017 11:00:40 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32622 Visitech_Solidworks_Masuri_Helmet_3
Briefed with reinventing the best helmet in cricket, many product designers would be stumped. Visitech stepped up to the crease and knocked the challenge for six – with a little help from SOLIDWORKS Simulation… Say hello to Alan Meeks, product

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Visitech: Making Cricket Safer with SOLIDWORKS Simulation appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Visitech_Solidworks_Masuri_Helmet_3

Briefed with reinventing the best helmet in cricket, many product designers would be stumped. Visitech stepped up to the crease and knocked the challenge for six – with a little help from SOLIDWORKS Simulation…

Say hello to Alan Meeks, product designer extraordinaire. Back when he formed his design company Visitech in 1989, he had no idea that just over two decades later he would be helping to create some of the most popular helmets in cricket. But that’s exactly what would happen when cricketing equipment manufacturer Masuri came knocking in 2011.

Visitech_Solidworks_Masuri_Helmet_1

Introducing Masuri: designers of the world’s finest cricket helmets

The world’s best batsmen are fearless. But when an in-form bowler is racing towards you, readying themselves to launch a solid 160g lump of leather-encased cork towards you at up to 80mph, let’s just say it helps if you are confident in your safety equipment. Masuri knows that better than most and since 1988 have been restlessly innovating helmet design to give legendary batsmen like Brian Lara and Mike Atherton extra confidence behind the crease. In short, Masuri push boundaries to help top players hit boundaries. Today Masuri remain the most widely used helmet brand in international cricket.

Masuri got to where it is by innovating. In 1988 it created the now commonplace stainless steel helmet grille. After switching manufacturing from Cape Town to the UK in 2011, the brains behind Masuri realised that cricket was becoming more dangerous, with increasing head and facial injuries to batsmen. Sporting authorities both in the UK and abroad were calling for increased safety standards for helmets and visors.  Rightly so.

 

Visitech_Solidworks_Masuri_Helmet_2

Having teamed up with Vistech, Masuri doubled down on its design efforts to create helmets that were safer, more reliable and of consistently high quality. The modern helmet had to be capable of absorbing the high impact of a cricket ball making contact at 80mph. It also had to feature a visor that prevented the ball hitting the batsman’s face, without obstructing their field of vision. The top of the range helmets that Masuri created, far exceeded minimum safety regulations and became the latest successes in Masuri’s pioneering history.

Yet it was when Visitech was asked to reinvent Masuri’s internationally renowned helmet that Alan Meeks’ product design skills came into their own.

Visitech_Solidworks_Masuri_Helmet_4 Visitech_Solidworks_Masuri_Helmet_3

How did SOLIDWORKS help?

Masuri’s top of the range helmets are made to exacting standards. They provide batsmen with an excellent field of vision and are made with the highest quality materials and finishes. The only problem? They are expensive to produce. Eager to expand into the club-level market, Masuri asked Visitech to create a helmet that was robust enough to surpass safety regulations yet economical to produce; affordable enough for club players and hobbyists yet capable of the high performance expected from Masuri products.

Visitech_Solidworks_Masuri_Helmet_5

SOLIDWORKS devotees since 1998, Visitech leapt at the challenge and began finding ways to optimise the Masuri blueprint for cost vs. strength vs. visibility. Using SOLIDWORKS Simulation to test the strengths and weaknesses of the helmet, Visitech was able to get the best out of the helmet mouldings using the minimum amount of metal and plastic. In other words, SOLIDWORKS made it possible to test exactly how paring back the materials would affect the strength of the helmet in the real world – without the need for costly prototyping for each iteration.

The result is the recently released Legacy series of helmets which are already becoming a huge success.

Innovators never stand still…

The tragic death in 2014 of Australian batsman Phillip Hughes after being struck in the neck by a cricket ball highlighted that there is never room for complacency in helmet design. Again working with Visitech, Masuri has released a clip-on addition to their helmet range called the Stem Guard. Made with TPU honeycomb and military-grade crush foam, after consultation with cricket’s governing bodies, the Stem Guard protects the vulnerable parts of the neck and provides high impact absorption for batsmen without hindering mobility.

Visitech_Solidworks_Masuri_Helmet_6

What’s next for Visitech?

The relationship between Visitech and Masuri has grown from strength to strength. Regardless of what you think of cricket, five years and not out isn’t a bad partnership.  With SOLIDWORKS on board, we are not about to bet against their continued innovation and productivity in cricket safety equipment.

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>> Plymouth University goes for land speed record in Nevada

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Visitech: Making Cricket Safer with SOLIDWORKS Simulation appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Unveiling the SOLIDWORKS Path to the Future of Design http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/unveiling-solidworks-path-future-design.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/unveiling-solidworks-path-future-design.html#respond Mon, 05 Jun 2017 13:34:32 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32635
In this post, Gian Paolo Bassi lays out the future roadmap for SOLIDWORKS.

Author information

Gian Paolo Bassi

Gian Paolo Bassi

Gian Paolo is CEO of Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS.

The post Unveiling the SOLIDWORKS Path to the Future of Design appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Choosing the right digital tools is becoming a critical aspect of business strategy for today’s companies. When those tools are the ones you entrust with creating your company’s new products, the lifeblood of product development organizations, choosing the right ones becomes vitally important. There are so many factors to take into consideration when considering software vendors to partner with; an important one is the financial strength of that company.

In 2016, SOLIDWORKS delivered 12 percent revenue growth, well above the PLM industry average. Approximately 40 percent of new license revenue can be attributed to licenses that replaced other CAD products. In the same year, SOLIDWORKS represented around 20 percent of Dassault Systèmes’ total revenues. In the first quarter of 2017, we have continued the momentum with 12 percent revenue growth over the previous year.

You might also want to ensure that your vendor’s corporate mission aligns with that of your own company. At SOLIDWORKS our mission continues to be to provide our customers with the tools they need to make great design happen. While our mission has not changed, there have been significant changes in both technology and society. Today technology is providing tremendous opportunities in both ubiquitous computing and pervasive connectivity. Society has been transformed by the demand for innovation and lower barriers of access to information, ideas, and the new disruptive business models of the “sharing economy.”

Customers are becoming increasingly sophisticated and demanding unique experiences from products, and the choices are virtually limitless. This requires us to constantly think ahead and anticipate trends to make sure we invest in the right ways that enable us to provide all our users with the best solutions, when they need them. We, therefore, are simultaneously investing across three strategic horizons:

Horizon One: Continued investment in our core technology.  For our flagship products like SOLIDWORKS Desktop CAD, PDM, and Simulation, the priority remains breadth and depth of capabilities, performance, and reliability. We have a very large and growing installed base, with customers who have been expanding with us for more than two decades. The number of SOLIDWORKS designs created over the years is remarkable, and we are fully aware of the importance of continuity and reliable data reuse at any time so we must maintain long-term partnerships with the providers of all critical components, like geometric kernels and solvers. In fact, we have no current plans to replace any of these components. On the contrary, we have provisions in place to help ensure long-term components viability in any business scenario.

schooled-solidworks-simulation-1

SOLIDWORKS Simulation enables every designer and engineer to carry out structural simulation on parts and assemblies with finite element analysis (FEA) while they work to improve and validate performance and reduce the need for costly prototypes or design changes later on.

 

Horizon Two: Expansion into adjacent areas. The nature of mechanical design is going decidedly in the direction of integrated mechatronics and connected products. SOLIDWORKS Electrical and SOLIDWORKS PCB support these requirements and provide seamless schematics-to-3D solutions that are unique in the market. Important developments are also happening in manufacturing, with the emergence of 3D printing, material science, and maker communities that demand easy-to-use and fully integrated design-to-manufacturing solutions. SOLIDWORKS is a founding member of the 3MF Consortium for the development of 3D printing standards. We have long been committed to design-to-manufacturing technologies with early support of the MBD format and the planned introduction of topology optimization.  We have also recently announced plans for SOLIDWORKS CAM, a 2 ½ axis “smart manufacturing” solution.

SOLIDWORKS CAM is a 2.5-axis milling and turning solution powered by CAMWorks that will allow users to program in either part or assembly environments.

 

Horizon Three: Anticipating the future. This includes our Cloud strategy, focused on the development of products based on the Dassault Systèmes 3DEXPERIENCE Platform, which include SOLIDWORKS Conceptual Designer and Industrial Designer and SOLIDWORKS Mechanical Engineer, which is coming soon. SOLIDWORKS Xdesign, a CAD system compatible with other 3DEXPERIENCE applications, is currently in private beta and is designed to work in any modern browser on any device without installation of local components.

SOLIDWORKS Desktop and Cloud solutions are designed for integration and compatibility, and you can decide whether to use them in concert or individually. One example is the recent introduction of Simulation Engineer (currently in beta), a 3DEXPERIENCE Solution that can help solve complex nonlinear problems formulated on the Desktop Version of SOLIDWORKS Simulation, literally “with one click of a mouse button.”

Conceptual Designers enables designers to rapidly create and evolve concepts without design barriers, and automatically capture their ideas to use anytime in the future.

 

Offering Users the Flexibility of Choice

We also firmly believe that you deserve choice and flexibility to best plan for the future of your business.  Our pricing strategy favors both stability and innovation. We have no plans to replace the traditional, “perpetual” license for applications and anticipate that this licensing model will continue for the foreseeable future. We believe that your annual, optional maintenance fee has tremendous value and we strive to deliver value well beyond maintenance and support. In fact, we plan to continue to deliver additional value for your maintenance fees by providing new tools such as SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard and SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard, and will soon have an announcement about the new SOLIDWORKS CAM solution.

We understand that business cycles and agile product development methodologies may require rapid allocation of resources for a limited amount of time. Therefore, in 2016, we introduced the “term” license, which allows you to use SOLIDWORKS software and services for specific periods of time without initial capital allocation. We also provide the increasingly popular option of “Software-as-a-Service” (SaaS) for products that run on our Cloud infrastructure.

While there has been a lot of change in our competitive landscape, at SOLIDWORKS we remain committed to providing our customers with best-in-class tools that facilitate agile product development as well as flexible business models that support your right to choose the way in which you purchase software, today and in the future.

Author information

Gian Paolo Bassi
Gian Paolo Bassi
Gian Paolo is CEO of Dassault Systèmes SOLIDWORKS.

The post Unveiling the SOLIDWORKS Path to the Future of Design appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Sci Chic: Launching a Business at the Intersection of Engineering, 3D Printing, Fashion, and Education http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/sci-chic-launching-business-intersection-engineering-3d-printing-fashion-education.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/06/sci-chic-launching-business-intersection-engineering-3d-printing-fashion-education.html#respond Thu, 01 Jun 2017 12:30:11 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32613
Erin Winick, Mechanical Engineer and Founder of Sci Chic, combined her passions for science and fashion into a 3D printing startup aimed at fostering interest in the STEM fields by showing off the fashionable side of science.

Author information

Mike Fearon

Mike Fearon

Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post Sci Chic: Launching a Business at the Intersection of Engineering, 3D Printing, Fashion, and Education appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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“I was debating on getting an entrepreneurship minor or starting my own company. I decided to make the leap. Starting a company is you putting yourself out there. If you have an idea, go for it. You can’t be too worried about not having it too perfect or ready. If you think it’s going to make a difference, put your idea out there. I wouldn’t be in this spot with my company if I didn’t take that chance.”

–          Erin Winick, Founder and CEO Sci Chic, B.S. Mechanical Engineering

Founded in October 2015, Sci Chic is an exciting mashup of science, technology, design and fashion. The company’s mission is to show the beauty in STEM and encourage young girls and women to pursue careers in science. The tools being used to complete this mission: killer, science-inspired jewelry and science-fashion subscription boxes designed in CAD and 3D printed in everything from plastic and steel to 14K gold. With inspired designs, such as the Apollo Trajectory necklace and Moon phase pieces to Pi and weather-themed jewelry, if you have an interest in science, Sci Chic has a piece for you.

Launching a Business with No Experience

CEO Erin Winick, then an engineering student at the University of Florida (UF), was inspired to pursue the company after helping start a 3D printing outreach program as president of the Society of Women Engineers. The outreach day brought 60 middle school girls to the UF campus to demonstrate computer modeling and how they could take these designs and transform them into 3D printed objects. The school girls’ reactions to seeing their work come to life ignited Erin’s devotion to showing the beauty in STEM.

“My biggest passion is science communication,” Erin stated. “I want to show people how much fun science and communication can be. I see the difference that people like Bill Nye and Neil deGrasse Tyson have made and it’s my ultimate goal to have some kind of positive impact on the way people think about science.”

“I came from an engineering background with no experience in business or sales,” Erin said. “When I started Sci Chic, it was a learning experience in addition to a passion project.” The work, much like STEM itself, revolved heavily on experimentation. On launch, Erin was running the business off of her personal printer, creating designs in SOLIDWORKS, and selling on Etsy. Eventually Erin grew to a dedicated e-commerce site in January 2016 and took to the task of establishing a brand and earning publicity.

In October 2016, Erin moved operations from her personal printer to The Selling Factory, a local co-working space in Gainesville, Florida. She now employs two workers, a CAD designer to help with monthly subscription box designs in SOLIDWORKS and a graphic designer to assist with marketing and the creation of promotional materials. Sci Chic also gets support from others in the co-working space with sales to assembly. “The Selling Factory really helps people without experience in sales and business learn and get things done,” Erin stated.

An Early Start for a Life in STEM

It should come as no surprise that Erin was introduced to engineering at a young age. “I always loved making things,” Erin said. “Everything from Legos, K’NEX and sewing kept me busy. I also had family members in the space program who valued and appreciated science and engineering. My love for making things and a supportive family really piqued my interest.” Clearly Erin’s experience is validation for encouraging kids to become invested in STEM at a young age.

Erin was introduced to SOLIDWORKS during her freshman year at UF. “I used SOLIDWORKS in a computer-aided design class, required for mechanical engineers,” said Erin. “I love the creativity SOLIDWORKS lets you have. It felt like using a very artistic tool in engineering. This was one of the determining factors that led me down the mechanical engineering path.”

Networking also paid dividends for Sci Chic. As part of the Society of Women Engineers, Erin attended the group’s National Conference. Here she met another college entrepreneur, and former SOLIDWORKS intern, Gaby Rochino. Gaby introduced Erin to the SOLIDWORKS Entrepreneur Program, an opportunity for startups to receive software, training, and co-marketing resources by partnering with SOLIDWORKS. Sci Chic joined the program in 2017.

Designing STEM Fashion in SOLIDWORKS

Erin and her team have a yearly calendar mapped out for their kids’ and adults’ monthly fashion boxes. “We try to plan out three months in advance to what’s in each both in terms of jewelry, like necklaces, charms, or rings,” Erin said. “That way we know the designs and can test and experiment with different materials. Since we’re able to create product quickly, we can reach out to women in STEM, one of our target audiences, get their opinions and hear their thoughts for other design ideas.” Again the business, in this case the monthly boxes, really mimics the collaboration needed in STEM careers.

“We’ve had great reactions from the kids and adults boxes from women everywhere from Australia to Germany,” Erin stated. “This gives anyone in STEM the opportunity to wear fashionable items inspired the fields they work in.” Further, Sci-Chic’s jewelry becomes conversation pieces to drive interest from both adults and kids alike. To illustrate, Erin pointed to a monthly kids’ box subscriber who purchases two boxes for her kids. “Both kids love learning about chemistry and coding thanks to their boxes and are much more excited about exploring science and technology than before.”

Sci Chic jewelry is manufactured in a wide variety of materials from Plastic ABS and PLA in multiple colors and filaments to stainless and bronze steel and even up to silver and 14K gold. Since a variety of designs and materials are used, Erin uses SOLIDWORKS to achieve proper dimensioning, meet wall thickness constraints and understand strength requirements.

For Erin and her team, it’s important to have tools that enable them to iterate on ideas quickly. Every month means brainstorming new, fresh, and fun ideas to meet the company’s monthly fashion box demands, which is critical to Sci Chic’s growth. “Our biggest business and educational goal is to grow subscription boxes,” Erin stated. “The boxes enable us to introduce kids and adults to different areas of science and maintain longer consumer connections. By increasing our subscribers, we can bring on more new designs and quality educational materials to everyone in our base.” Ultimately, getting more subscribers means introducing or extending the world of STEM to future innovators. The world would be a better place for it and hopefully more students will follow Erin’s lead and make that leap.

To learn more about Sci Chic or to sign up, please visit: http://www.scichic.com

Author information

Mike Fearon
Mike Fearon
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post Sci Chic: Launching a Business at the Intersection of Engineering, 3D Printing, Fashion, and Education appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Recreating Classic Cars with CAD: Tucker Torpedo Project Update http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/recreating-classic-cars-cad-tucker-torpedo-project-update-4.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/recreating-classic-cars-cad-tucker-torpedo-project-update-4.html#respond Wed, 31 May 2017 13:00:41 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32592
This is part 8 in the blog series covering how a group of car enthusiasts are re-creating the Tucker Torpedo concept car with SOLIDWORKS.

Author information

Mike Sabocheck

Senior Area Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS, NA East

The post Recreating Classic Cars with CAD: Tucker Torpedo Project Update appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Welcome to part eight of a blog series covering how a group of car and engineering enthusiasts are bringing the Tucker Torpedo concept car to life. If you haven’t read the other Tucker Blog entries, you can get caught up here:

Part 1   Part 2   Part 3   Part 4   Part 5   Part 6   Part 7

Rob Ida continues to put in long hours on the Tucker Torpedo. During a recent discussion he said, “I’ve been putting in at least 10 hours a day on the Torpedo” and it shows. Most of the body panels, the roof, hood, and passenger side panels, as you can see here, are complete. The body panels are temporarily fastened to the substructure so the interface between them can be checked to ensure the gaps are even and the transition for one panel to the next is smooth.

Making these panels is no easy feat. The number of reverse curves each panel has makes forming them difficult because the metal curves in two directions as seen in the images of the roof panels. A lot of thought has to go into each panel before forming it. You don’t want to start forming a panel only to find out the curvature is not correct, because you can’t correct it, you have to start over.

Here’s another good example of a double curved form. This is the right rear panel that the rear fender will be mated to. In order to have a smooth transition between the panel and the fender, the curve has to start in the panel. Looking closer at the rear panel and you’ll see the contour of the rear fender is already started in the panel. The curve is very tight in this area and extremely difficult to form. This doesn’t faze Rob in his pursuit of perfection.

Another difficult area is the front end where the hood and side panel come together as seen in the images below. The contour below the center headlight curves in multiple directions and is probably the most difficult area of the body to form. But with Rob’s skill and patience he was able to form it the way he wanted it to look.

Rob took on a “special” Tucker project for the Antique Automobile Club of America Museum in Hershey, PA. They wanted a replica of the Tucker “48” as an interactive display for kids to play with. So Rob used the molds he has for the “48” to make a fiberglass front end. He added steering and, of course, the pivoting headlight controlled by the steering wheel. The finishing touches will be the front bumper, which is in the process of being fabricated and an original Tucker Radio for the dashboard.

Click on the images below for a short video of the display in action.

 

The next big milestone is on the horizon. The body panel fabrication is soon getting to the point where the whole body structure can be removed from the wooden buck and then fitted to the chassis. There’s still a lot of work to be done between now and then, and I think by the next blog that process should be about ready to happen. Once that happens Rob can focus on other areas of the Torpedo like the body trim including front and rear bumpers and the interior with its unique turntable the seats will be mounted to.

Rob uses the original plaster of Paris 1/24 scale model as his design guide. The below images show the front grill and bumper along with trim around the three headlights and the trim on the rear fenders.

The rear of the Torpedo will get the same polished aluminum treatment. There are a few unique features, such as the “rocket exhaust port,” which is actually a light to use when backing up and the “shark fin” running down the length of the roof. The vertical slots in the rear bumper will be running, brake and directional tail lights.

I’ll leave you with something to watch in your spare time. Rob has been working with Bravo Media to capture the whole process of building the Torpedo on digital media. You can watch the trailer for the documentary here and get to see Rob, his Dad Bob, Sean Tucker, Bob Cuneo and Bob Kerekes, the owner of the Tucker.

Author information

Mike Sabocheck
Senior Area Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS, NA East

The post Recreating Classic Cars with CAD: Tucker Torpedo Project Update appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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The Time to Move to 3D CAD is Now and Here’s Why http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/time-move-3d-cad-now-heres.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/time-move-3d-cad-now-heres.html#respond Tue, 30 May 2017 13:40:27 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32536
While designing in 2D may seem easier, you are losing out on some benefits that would not only make your company more competitive, but would make you more valuable in the job market. Learn why the time to move to 3D CAD is now.

Author information

Barbara Schmitz

Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks

Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post The Time to Move to 3D CAD is Now and Here’s Why appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Product designers and engineers today are under the gun to crank out products at breakneck pace. And, consumers, the ultimate “boss” of all product development companies, don’t want just any products. Today’s consumers demand products that are smart and connected, are aesthetically pleasing, high quality, personalized and are offered at a price they are willing to pay. Competition has stiffened, time to market is shrinking and fickle consumers are demanding more functionality than ever. All of this combines to make product development more complex than ever.

So how do manufacturers keep up? Well, industry leaders hire the best engineers and designers, and they use the best tools available on the market. In world of product development, that means using 3D CAD. Nonetheless there is still a lot of product design being done in 2D.

In a recently released Tech-Clarity eBook entitled “The How-to Guide for Transitioning from 2D to 3D CAD,” the author points out the many shortcomings of designing products using 2D CAD tools. While designing in 2D may seem easier, you are losing out on some benefits that would not only make your company more competitive, but would make you more valuable in the job market. The future of design is 3D so you can bet that the majority of jobs will require competency in 3D CAD.

Find problems earlier. Let’s tackle how moving from 2D to 3D CAD can benefit the process of designing new products. Using 3D CAD enables engineers and designers to detect problems with their designs much earlier because you can clearly see interferences between various components, something you are blissfully unaware of if your designs are created as 2D drawings. Unfortunately the bliss is short-lived when those interferences rear their ugly heads way down the line in prototyping when changes are costly, both in terms of cost and time to market.

Identify qualify issues faster. By creating products as 3D models first, designers can conduct virtual tests using simulation software to determine very early in the design process—long before physical models exist—whether your final product can withstand the rigors of its real-world environment. In addition to testing for strength, users can also test for thermal characteristics, vibration, frequency, kinematics, flow simulation, etc. By pinpointing problems early in the design cycle, engineers can go back and tweak and re-test, letting them rest assured that their final products will perform as designed.

By using FEA tools, such as SOLIDWORKS Simulation, you can validate products and test them in their real-world environments early in the design process.

 

More iterations = better products. The only way to truly create an innovative product is to evaluate as many design options as possible. If you’re relying on 2D CAD, the number of iterations is severely limited, due to the high cost of physical prototyping and the realities of shorter time to market. The luxury of asking “what if” and having these queries answered without the need for any physical model—through the use of virtual tests—enables truly optimized products to be created without sacrificing time to market.

Easier design collaboration. Today, more and more disciplines are involved in design reviews. If you’re still using 2D CAD, however, clearly communicating design intent takes on a new level of difficulty. Interpreting 2D drawings requires specialized skills. Sharing a product model in 3D greatly improves design collaboration and reduces the number of errors or miscommunications.

Faster design changes. Changes are an everyday reality for product designers. By offering design “associativity” when changes are made to the 3D CAD model, anything that references it (including drawings, assemblies, NC programs, etc.) are automatically updated to reflect that change. So even late-stage design changes can be made without the need to redraw or recreate downstream deliverables. This leads to substantially shorter design cycles, accelerated time-to-market, and increased productivity.

Still not convinced? Download the “How-To Guide for Transitioning from 2D CAD to 3D CAD” eBook to learn best practices that will help you shorten the learning curve for adopting a 3D CAD tool and achieve the fastest possible ROI.

Author information

Barbara Schmitz
Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks
Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post The Time to Move to 3D CAD is Now and Here’s Why appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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SOLIDWORKS MBD How-To Video Series (Part 1) http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/solidworks-mbd-video-series-part-1.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/solidworks-mbd-video-series-part-1.html#respond Thu, 25 May 2017 12:00:26 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32568
Check out several cool 3D PDF samples of a miter saw assembly and a housing assembly published by SOLIDWORKS Model-Based Definition.

Author information

Oboe Wu

Oboe Wu

Product portfolio manager of SOLIDWORKS MBD, passionate about smart manufacturing opportunities, Keen listener to customer challenges, Sharp problem solver with 20 years of experiences in engineering, Sleepless father trying best to take care of a baby daughter.

The post SOLIDWORKS MBD How-To Video Series (Part 1) appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Would you like to show off some 3D models with annotations to your friends who don’t have SOLIDWORKS installed? Check out several cool 3D PDF samples of a miter saw assembly and a housing assembly published by SOLIDWORKS Model-Based Definition. Your friends can just open them with Adobe Reader, click on “trust this document” to view the 3D content. For more detailed 3D PDF instructions, please watch this video. You are also welcome to join the discussions on the user forum.

The next natural question is how to publish these 3D PDF documents yourself. To answer this question, Chris Pagliarini recently shared his SOLIDWORKS MBD experiences in a four-video series: Define 3D annotations, Organize 3D annotations, Customize 3D PDF templates, and Publish 3D PDF.
This part 1 video shown below shares how to:

  • Set up SOLIDWORKS MBD for your specific workflows.
  • Define location dimensions, size dimensions, and geometric tolerances.
  • Specify continuous features, intersection geometries and patterns.
  • Edit call-out styles.

I hope you enjoyed this tutorial. Please share your feedback in the comment area below. To learn more about SOLIDWORKS MBD, please watch the 22-minute webcast below and visit its product page.

Author information

Oboe Wu
Oboe Wu
Product portfolio manager of SOLIDWORKS MBD, passionate about smart manufacturing opportunities, Keen listener to customer challenges, Sharp problem solver with 20 years of experiences in engineering, Sleepless father trying best to take care of a baby daughter.

The post SOLIDWORKS MBD How-To Video Series (Part 1) appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Valley Dairy Farm Automation Triples Production By Moving From 2D to SOLIDWORKS Solutions http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/valley-dairy-farm-automation-triples-production-moving-2d-solidworks-solutions.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/valley-dairy-farm-automation-triples-production-moving-2d-solidworks-solutions.html#respond Wed, 24 May 2017 13:04:46 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32350
Learn how Valley Dairy Farm Automation optimized production and increased product offerings to meet rapidly growing demand.

Author information

Josie Morales

Josie Morales

Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post Valley Dairy Farm Automation Triples Production By Moving From 2D to SOLIDWORKS Solutions appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Is 2D slowing you down and limiting your ability to create innovative designs? Do you find yourself spending too much time revising designs?  Kevin Bouwman, General Manager of Valley Dairy Farm Automation (VDFA), felt the same way and knew that in order to keep up with the growth of VDFA business, he needed a faster and more efficient way to create his designs with less mistakes.  Let’s take a look at their story.

Founded in 1982 as a dealer for Bou-Matic dairy equipment in northwest Iowa, southeast South Dakota, and southwest Minnesota, Valley Dairy Farm Automation has grown to become a leading manufacturer of customized, innovative dairy farm automation products.

According to Bouwman, “As business grew, designing and manufacturing in 2D became frustrating and limiting,” Bouwman recalls. “Whenever I needed to make a design change, I had to make the change to multiple drawing views, which wasted time. Roughly 40 percent of our products involve sheet metal, and because dairy applications require either stainless or hot-dip galvanized steel, design errors are costly. That’s why I investigated 3D design solutions.”

VDFA chose SOLIDWORKS solutions because of the expansive and supportive online community, short learning curve, and industry-leading sheet metal and weldment design tools. Today, VDFA relies on SOLIDWORKS Premium mechanical design and analysis software to develop its dairy automation systems and recently added SOLIDWORKS Electrical 3D to develop associated electrical systems for its products.

Since standardizing on SOLIDWORKS, VDFA has developed equipment designs that are more innovative, elaborate, and complete, with fewer mistakes and errors. As a result, the company has tripled the number of products that it develops annually. “The move to SOLIDWORKS has allowed us to go from designing a small number of products to support the equipment dealership to offering more than 100 different automation products,” Bouwman says. “With SOLIDWORKS, we can develop products more professionally in terms of fit and function than many global manufacturers, and every year, we add three times as many new products.”

To find out more about the Valley Dairy Farm Automation and how they tripled its production while minimizing design errors with SOLIDWORKS Premium and SOLIDWORKS Electrical 3D, Click Here. Then click the below banner to explore the role agricultural equipment plays in delivering your favorite beers from the farm to your glass.

Author information

Josie Morales
Josie Morales
Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post Valley Dairy Farm Automation Triples Production By Moving From 2D to SOLIDWORKS Solutions appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids Make a Noise at Maker Faire http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/solidworks-apps-kids-make-noise-maker-faire.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/solidworks-apps-kids-make-noise-maker-faire.html#respond Tue, 23 May 2017 11:00:05 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32504 Apps-For-Kids-Maker-Faire-UK-3
Tiny children have the biggest ideas. A child’s mind is an astonishing hive of creativity. SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids harnesses that invention and turns it into reality and was abundantly demonstrated at Maker Faire 2017, little minds find SOLIDWORKS Apps

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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Apps-For-Kids-Maker-Faire-UK-3

Tiny children have the biggest ideas. A child’s mind is an astonishing hive of creativity. SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids harnesses that invention and turns it into reality and was abundantly demonstrated at Maker Faire 2017, little minds find SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids fun as well as easy to master.

Apps-For-Kids-Maker-Faire-UK-1
From potential to print

Last month SOLIDWORKS got to show exactly what SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids is all about at Maker Faire UK in Newcastle. Displaying 3D printed models straight from our app, they’re the physical fruits of fertile minds’ creative labour. The bright, eye-catching renderings captured attentions and enraptured imaginations, from the very young to those drawing a pension.


From app to actuality

At an exhibition with over 4,000 visitors that champions creativity, who could resist stopping by to investigate? Eliciting a flurry of activity on the exhibition floor, SOLIDWORKS found keen minds attracted to the possibilities on offer.

Pre-schoolers jostled with silver-haired hobbyists for a go on SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids. Children pestered their parents for a longer stay. Teachers made enquiries about making the app available for schools – and more than a few jaws dropped when they realised our versatile app is available for the glorious price of free.

Apps-For-Kids-Maker-Faire-UK-2

The approachable pick-up-and-build ethos fired the imaginations of all present, bridging the gap between creativity and accessible design.


Science, meet art

What became apparent over the two days was the app’s ability to blur the lines between art and science. In a good way. Viewed often as two distinct disciplines, SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids shows that this boundary is largely an imaginary construct.

We had children as young as three diving in, carving out their creativity in a world of design. It’s how Leonardo Da Vinci operated. He juggled both blueprints and brush strokes pretty successfully, don’t you think?

Children don’t delineate rigidly between art and science. Creating is creating, right? Science fiction drives scientific discovery – and that’s a scientific fact.

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Sign Up, create, make…

During the bustling invention of Maker Faire, we demonstrated that imagination is a rich seedbed for design and creation. With an average age range between six and 14 years old, eager young intellects ran with SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids’ opportunities and got visualising, designing and making.

See what SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids can do for your little ones’ attitude.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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Crafting a Career in Mechanical Design (and Brewing) with David Gilmour of Phillips Brewing http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/crafting-career-mechanical-design-brewing-david-gilmour-phillips-brewing.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/crafting-career-mechanical-design-brewing-david-gilmour-phillips-brewing.html#respond Mon, 22 May 2017 15:27:03 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32558
David Gilmour of Phillips Brewing shares details of his automated growler filling machine and how he started a career in beer.

Author information

Mike Fearon

Mike Fearon

Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post Crafting a Career in Mechanical Design (and Brewing) with David Gilmour of Phillips Brewing appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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David Gilmour is a maintenance engineer at Phillips Brewing and Malting Co., a small-batch craft brewery in Victoria, British Columbia. Previously, Gilmour shared how Phillips uses engineering and technology to ensure its delicious brews get to the mouths of its loyal and thirsty customers. If you’re interested in beer and engineering, definitely give it a read. This post will cover Gilmour’s start in engineering, including a brewing project he completed while in school. Side note: I clearly went to the wrong school.

Like many engineers, Gilmour’s interest in building and inventing came at a young age. “As a kid I would spend hours building gizmos and gadgets out of Legos and Construx, as a teenager I built BMX bikes to ride and race, and while working as an arborist in my 20s, I would take apart and rebuild chainsaws and other power equipment,” Gilmore said. “I decided to capitalize on this interest and returned to school in my thirties, receiving a diploma in mechanical engineering technology two and a half years ago. Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine that my love for engineering design and tasty libations would be a possible career option!”

Gilmour was introduced to the basics of 2D and 3D modeling in CAD classes in tech school. After he graduated, he honed his SOLIDWORKS skills on a number of projects including a large project where he helped develop sport simulators for Olympic museums.

While Gilmour went back to school to pursue his mechanical engineering degree, Phillips actually sponsored his capstone project, which was designed entirely in SOLIDWORKS. “My classmates and I designed and built a Growler-filling vending machine dubbed the “Growlermatic.” Customers use a specially made tokens to have their growler filled by an automated machine that pressurizes the growler using CO2 before filling it with beer, which reduces the amount of O2 in the beer, lengthening shelf life and improving the flavor profile.” Now if I can just get one of these in the office…

Of course the next question has to be, which beer should we fill our growler with? “I find my tastes for different styles changes with the season, and right now I am enjoying Phillips Shortwave, a hoppy, west coast-style pale ale,” Gilmour stated. “One of my all-time favorites is our Electric Unicorn white IPA. I think a perfect beer is made with the best ingredients, a perfect blend of hops, precisely malted barley, fresh clean water, and perfectly cultivated yeast. Many beer styles have different elements that make them stand out, but these basic ingredients are required to make the perfect beer.”

Thanks to the work of smart engineers like David Gilmour, we can all enjoy our beer of choice and explore new offerings is easier than ever before! The next time you have a beer, be sure to raise a glass to the people behind the brews. Not all heroes wear capes! Check out Phillips Brewing cool beers and gear here. Read more about how Phillips Brewing engineers its equipment in CAD in this blog post.

Author information

Mike Fearon
Mike Fearon
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post Crafting a Career in Mechanical Design (and Brewing) with David Gilmour of Phillips Brewing appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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SOLIDWORKS Visualize User Spotlight: Peter Hildebrandt http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/solidworks-visualize-user-spotlight-peter-hildebrandt.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/solidworks-visualize-user-spotlight-peter-hildebrandt.html#respond Fri, 19 May 2017 12:00:41 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32438
This blog post highlights a power user of SOLIDWORKS Visualize.

Author information

Brian Hillner

Brian Hillner

Brian Hillner is the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager.

The post SOLIDWORKS Visualize User Spotlight: Peter Hildebrandt appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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The Visualize Featured User spotlight has now launched! Join us here for a Q&A highlighting how one of your peers uses SOLIDWORKS Visualize in their daily workflow. This month’s featured Visualize user is Peter Hildebrandt from Working Image, located in Germany.

What you are seeing are not photographs! They are images and animations created in SOLIDWORKS Visualize.

Q: Let’s start with the basics. Tell us a little about yourself and your background.
A: I’m Peter Hildebrandt and the owner of Working Image. I’m an advertising photographer and started my business in the “good old analog time” in 1989. I’ve always been impressed with the imagery produced from CGI. On my search for a software that is easy to use, shows results immediately and produces photographic renders, I found Bunkspeed in 2011, and used several Bunkspeed products. I’ve since transitioned to using SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional.

Q: Looking at your Visualize imagery, I can tell you’ve created some amazing photo-quality content for loads of clients in different industries. How is Visualize currently used in your workflow?
A: Visualize has changed my workflow. I don´t create models in CAD, however, I do use Visualize for creating photorealistic renderings for advertising use. Examples are for print, web and even exhibitions. I used to have to manually photograph products in photo studios, but now they are easily rendered in Visualize, saving loads of time. Using a combination of photography, CGI and post-production gives me an incredible power to create photo-quality pictures for my clients.

Q: Given your background in traditional photography, how has Visualize accelerated or improved your workflow?
A: Using the example of the car lifting platform in the image above, prepping these large objects to photograph in a traditional photography studio takes a lot of time, effort and money. You need a place large enough for the lift to fit, and lots of time and manpower to assemble it. Choosing Visualize to create the pictures made all this costly work obsolete. Also it was no problem to show the line-up of the platforms in two difference color schemes, which was a big benefit for my client. An easy way of reproducibility, organization and logistics is a decisive point of using Visualize/CGI for my presentations. Not to forget, for creative-minded people, there are almost endless possibilities to create pictures using Visualize.

Q: Why is SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional integral to your daily workflow, and a ‘must-have’ for your company to stay ahead of the competition?
A: Simply stated, SOLIDWORKS Visualize gives me the power to create stunning pictures and animations. I couldn’t achieve the same quality with traditional photography and especially not on budget.

Q: What features do you use the most in Visualize?
A: I like the possibility to customize the Appearance settings for my specific needs. Another is the Depth of Field option. I often use this feature to give my renderings a photorealistic touch. The possibility to render out different Render Passes makes compositing work in post-production much easier. Lastly, one thing I cannot live without is the integrated Render Queue in Visualize Professional. It´s a real time saver.

Q: Well it seems like you know exactly what you’re doing in Visualize. What is your favorite feature in Visualize?
A: My most favorite feature is the excellent connection to HDR Light Studio. It makes lighting very intuitive and super easy. You get to experiment with powerful features and fancy settings, because you can see the results immediately using the Visualize plug-in.

Q: What tip would you share with all the new Visualize users out there?
A: Play with the different settings and options for the Appearances. You´ll discover settings you never even thought of changing. Don´t make your renders perfectly clean; make sure to add little dust, textures, scratches and imperfections by using texture maps. At last, remember, there is only one sun outside. So when lighting a scene/object, only use one main light. This will help keep your scenes simple and produce great results. And keep your eyes open; watch how objects, materials and light interact in the real world.

Here are some more examples of Peter’s inspiring work. Thanks for sharing, Peter and happy Visualize-ing!

If you have SOLIDWORKS CAD Professional or Premium and are on active Subscription, then you get SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard complimentary! And this free seat of Visualize Standard can be given to anyone in your company…even a different department! Visualize is a separate stand-alone product and does not occupy the SOLIDWORKS CAD license. Check out this blog post for download/install instructions and get started today!

Want to be spotlighted as a Visualize Featured User? Simply post your Visualize content to this Forum link for consideration.

Author information

Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner is the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager.

The post SOLIDWORKS Visualize User Spotlight: Peter Hildebrandt appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Engineering a Craft Beer Revolution with Phillips Brewing http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/engineering-craft-beer-revolution-phillips-brewing.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/engineering-craft-beer-revolution-phillips-brewing.html#respond Thu, 18 May 2017 12:30:27 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32493
Phillips Brewing and Malting Company offers an amazing range of beer and awesome experiences built on consistently crafting an excellent product. Learn the engineering know-how responsible for making that consistency a reality.

Author information

Mike Fearon

Mike Fearon

Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post Engineering a Craft Beer Revolution with Phillips Brewing appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Phillips Brewing and Malting Company is a small-batch craft brewery in Victoria, British Columbia producing amazing beers since 2001. Known for crafting a wide variety of brews to satisfy any palate, Phillips is a standout example of the global independent brewing revival. From the moment you check out its colorful website and peruse its unique offerings, such as Space Goat (dry-hopped oat pale ale) and Electric Unicorn (white IPA), you know this isn’t a 1990s craft beer.

While it’s clear Phillips conveys a fun attitude, the company is very serious about crafting quality beer. David Gilmour, maintenance engineer at Phillips, is part of the team responsible for ensuring that brewing equipment is performing properly and churning out a consistent, quality product. A lot of engineering work goes into keeping the taps flowing and customers satisfied; and SOLIDWORKS is among the tools used by Phillips to make its brewing magic happen.

Gilmour has been working in the maintenance department at Phillips for the past two years. He and his team perform routine upkeep and also design equipment related to all aspects of the beer-making process, from brewing to packaging. “Technology plays a large role in almost all aspects of the brewing process,” said Gilmour. “Many of the steps that are involved in the process are automated and require precise control, so being able to design equipment specific to our needs is very important.”

This automation process relies on a Swiss watch-level of precision, adding more weight to Gilmour and his team’s work on maintaining brewing technology. “We employ a fully automated brewhouse, so once a recipe is dialed in, the process can be completed using equipment and instrumentation, which allows for very precise brewing,” stated Gilmour. “In the brewhouse, automated systems communicate accurate temperatures and times to the brewers, thereby allowing for accurate control of each brew. The use of automation on the packaging line lets us track the number of bottles and cans that make it through our facility and helps us identify areas that can be made more efficient, increasing productivity on the line.”

Mash Filter in SOLIDWORKS

After that quick introduction to the Phillips brewery, it’s clear that no two brewers are the same. Craft brewers, like Phillips, have unique needs specific to their product that might not fit with other craft brewers – never mind macro brewers. Essentially, one size does not fit all in brewing. As Gilmour attests, the ability to quickly design custom parts is critical to maintaining old equipment and guaranteeing efficient brewing processes.

“Since we are a small brewery growing rapidly, we have multiple projects happening all the time,” Gilmour said. “We are in the final stages of installing a new brewhouse, and I utilized SOLIDWORKS in many ways through the installation process. A 3D model of the brewery was used to layout vessels, equipment and plumbing to ensure an efficient workspace. Our brewery uses new and old equipment and it can be difficult to find parts for some of the older equipment in use. I have utilized SOLIDWORKS to design smaller parts and pieces for this machinery to have it fabricated locally.”

While designing, Gilmour often takes advantage of assembly, sheet metal and weldment features, “one of the features of SOLIDWORKS that I think make it stand out from other CAD packages is the ability to efficiently create parts within an assembly,” said Gilmour. “This is a feature that I use to ensure the part I am designing is the perfect size and shape to avoid collision and keep costs down. I also use sheet metal and weldment features quite regularly to create parts with complex bends and welded joints. In previous projects I have used the extensive surfacing package in SOLIDWORKS to create molds for composite manufacturing as well.”

Mash Filter at the Brewery

In addition to designing smaller parts for older machinery, Gilmour is using 3D CAD on larger projects. “Right now I am in the testing phase of a large piece of equipment that I designed using SOLIDWORKS,” Gilmour said. “Once the malted barley is boiled to remove all of the sugars and enzymes used in brewing the spent grain must be removed from the wort, the sugary liquid that will eventually become beer.  To perform this task we use a mash filter, which is a series of filter plates and air bladders that remove as much of the wort out of the grain as possible. I designed a frame for the press that puts it at a height accessible to the brewers, about 12 feet off the ground, and a large drag conveyor to carry the grain to a pump. I used a 3D model of the brewery I created in SOLIDWORKS to lay out the piping system that carries the grain from the pump to a silo 200 feet away that holds the grain, which is then used by local farmers to feed their livestock.” It’s the brewing circle of life with engineering ingenuity and SOLIDWORKS.

While Gilmour understands that humans play the most important role in crafting a great beer, technology continues to facilitate better brewing processes. “I think that advances in engineering technology will allow for the increase of quality assurance and precise control over all aspects of the beer making process,” Gilmour said. “Advances in design technology are giving craft breweries like Phillips the ability to bring engineering design in house, which helps create specific equipment for the needs of the brewery.”

Author information

Mike Fearon
Mike Fearon
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post Engineering a Craft Beer Revolution with Phillips Brewing appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Moving Additive Manufacturing from Concept to Production http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/moving-additive-manufacturing-concept-production.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/moving-additive-manufacturing-concept-production.html#respond Wed, 17 May 2017 21:16:44 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32518
At the Additive Manufacturing Symposium, experts in additive manufacturing from industry, academia and government came together to discuss the opportunities and challenges of additive manufacturing.

Author information

Barbara Schmitz

Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks

Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post Moving Additive Manufacturing from Concept to Production appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Yesterday I had the pleasure of joining hundreds of additive manufacturing enthusiasts at the Dassault Systemes’ first-ever Additive Manufacturing Symposium in Chicago, which was part of the larger SCIENCE in the Age of Experience event being held May 15-18. The goal of the event was to bring the world’s leading experts and advocates of additive manufacturing (AM) together to share insights regarding the latest innovations, collaboratively address on-going industry challenges, and generate ideas to accelerate the widespread adoption and advancement of the technology.

The agenda was jam-packed with leaders from industry, government and academia. First up was Derek Luther, an engineer with Adidas, who discussed the role 3D printing played in the creation of the company’s first-ever 3D printed running shoe, the FutureCraft 4D, which features a highly complex lattice structure, shown in the video below here.

 
The German company partnered with Carbon, a tech company that uses an additive manufacturing process known as Direct Light Synthesis. By moving to additive manufacturing, Luther says the engineers and designers have more design freedom, can iterate quicker due to faster part speeds and now have the ability to engineer every cell of the shoe’s lattice structure per individual customer. The company plans to ship 5,000 of the shoes by end of year with plans to ramp up in 2018.

Next up was John Vickers from NASA’s Marshall Flight Center who emphasized how critical AM is to NASA’s missions, especially the Mars mission. Making the point that’s it’s impossible to bring additional supplies and redundant parts with the astronomical (pun intended) pay load costs for space travel, the ability to create parts through on-board 3D printing is essential to the mission.

Troy Hartwig from the Kansas City National Security Campus (NSC) discussed how AM has greatly increased designers ability to innovate has changed what was possible in design, introducing novel forms and shapes that were never possible before due to the constraints of traditional manufacturing methods. “Breakthroughs come when you stop thinking about design constraints and you can add complexity to your designs without the additional costs normally associated with that.”

The NSC is using 3D printing for prototyping and material characterization, along with tooling and fixtures around different systems.

 

Jerry Feldmiller from Orbital ATK talked on the importance of industry participation in shaping future hardware, software and materials for AM. Feldmiller said his company has been very involved with AM, beta testing the company’s launch vehicle components using AM machines from Statasys, and believes that work has spawned many new areas of research at Orbital. He emphasizes the importance of internal user groups at companies to share important information on AM and to maximize machine use across teams and divisions. Feldmiller also believes that external user groups should be actively developing and sharing best practices for designing for 3D printing and that academia must play a role in STEM-related activities to address the growing skills gap, citing the 2 million jobs that will go unfulfilled over the next decade.

Metal 3D printing allows for complex geometries and assemblies that previously would have required multiple components, to be simplified into a single, cost-effective assembly, without compromising on strength or structure.

 

Tim Simpson, a professor at Penn State University, spoke about the challenges and research opportunities for AM. Simpson said that AM has drastically changed the way we approach design. By using AM engineers can design very lightweight components using internal lattice structures, something impossible by traditional manufacturing methods. He used the example of a Titanium 3D-printed hip implant, which can now go from concept to FDA approval in just 14 months. Another advantage is that through use of AM, these implants eventually will be fully customized to each patient’s body.

Jack Rome from The Aerospace Corporation discussed process simulation for developing AM parts for space applications. Most might think of simulation being used to analyze individual components or assemblies of components, however, to validate parts for space applications, the process of AM must also be validated. When designing for AM, material variability must be taken into consideration during the design process. He also emphasized the need for AM industry standards, in additional to the efforts of individual organizations, such as ASME.

Following up on the topic of standardization was Lyle Levine of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) who spoke on additive manufacturing of metals. One of the reasons Levine believes that metal AM isn’t more prevalent is its inherent complexities. The cooling rates of various alloys vary greatly, making the non-linear behavior of the material more unpredictable. To create metals parts with AM, users must use simulation to “bridge the gap.” His organization is working in a pillared approach to facilitate industry adoption; creating a “knowledge box” of tools to use for AM and an “engineering box” with standards, best practices, validation methods and benchmark tests.

Jack Beuth, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University, discussed the challenges of AM for industry. He said that while not many companies are using AM for production currently, the technology is still making a significant impact on product development. Often companies start with service bureaus and in-house tooling and prototyping as a first step into AM. He used GE as an example of a company spearheading the use of advanced digital manufacturing and AM, in particular. The company is currently using AM for producing many of the subsystems for jet engines. GE estimates that by using AM it can reduce part counts by 800 on its new jet engines and nearly 30 percent of the parts on its new gas turbine engine are being 3D printed.

Rather than cutting, milling and drilling engine components, GE is welding together thin layers of powdered metal with a 200-watt laser and build parts from the ground up.

 

For more information on how the different types of additive manufacturing work, interesting articles and on-demand webinars, check out the new section on the SOLIDWORKS website at http://www.solidworks.com/am.

 

Author information

Barbara Schmitz
Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks
Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post Moving Additive Manufacturing from Concept to Production appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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22-Minute Webinar: How to Design Connected Devices http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/22-minute-webinar-connected-devices.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/22-minute-webinar-connected-devices.html#respond Wed, 17 May 2017 13:29:10 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32455
Increasingly customers now expect new products to be intelligent, and often connected to the internet through Bluetooth or wireless, from the Nest thermostat in the home to manufacturing facilities.  In fact, Gartner predicts that the total number of “things” or

Author information

Cliff Medling

Cliff Medling

Cliff Medling is a Senior Marketing Manager at SolidWorks

The post 22-Minute Webinar: How to Design Connected Devices appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Increasingly customers now expect new products to be intelligent, and often connected to the internet through Bluetooth or wireless, from the Nest thermostat in the home to manufacturing facilities.  In fact, Gartner predicts that the total number of “things” or connected devices will reach 20.4 billion by 2020.

In response, companies are looking to be the first in their respective industries to have their product include intelligence and/or connectivity.  Society is also becoming more social and more connected…from smart products to smart cities, which has made designing products more complex than ever before.

As product design is evolving and business is transforming to accommodate the demands from customers, we have learned that adding intelligence to products adds several new challenges.

On May 23rd, we will be presenting a 22-Minute webinar: Design of Smart & Connected Things that  will explain how to simplify this process—and resolve these challenges—by using SOLIDWORKS® full ecosystem of innovative solutions.  We will focus on clarifying the changing role of “supplier of products” to “provider of intelligent products.”

Register for the 22-Minute Webinar for May 23rd (11AM and 2PM EST) here…

 

Author information

Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling
Cliff Medling is a Senior Marketing Manager at SolidWorks

The post 22-Minute Webinar: How to Design Connected Devices appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery: Starting our Mash http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/brewing-with-electricity-the-solidworks-brewery-starting-our-mash.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/brewing-with-electricity-the-solidworks-brewery-starting-our-mash.html#respond Tue, 16 May 2017 12:30:48 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32482
Part three of the brewery series looks at the mashing process and how the electrical cabinet is critical to creating a controlled environment.

Author information

JP Emanuele

JP Emanuele

JP is a Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, North America.

The post Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery: Starting our Mash appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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So we’re back it again and if you’ve been following along, we’ve managed to prepare our system and have progressed into the first real stage of making beer – the mashing process. This is where we slowly poured twelve pounds of grain into our mash kettle and patiently waited for the all the sugars to be extracted in order to create our wort. As this step is being carried out, the unforgettable aroma of steeped grains filled our nostrils. I for one enjoy this distinct smell. However, if you ask my wife, she doesn’t find it as pleasant as I do. More for me I guess…

This mashing phase can vary depending on the equipment and the recipe being used, but for our process, it took seventy-five minutes to be exact.  During that time, you could imagine five grown men standing around the kitchen waiting impatiently to start the next step. As we watched the wort swirl around the kettle, it needed to be maintained at a precise temperature. If the kettle became too hot, the grains would release tannins, which produce off-flavors or bitterness into our wort. If the temperature dropped too low, we’d be making a beer flavored porridge instead.

So with the electric brewing system we used, we were able to simply set the required temperature on our panel, which in turn monitored the temperature and controlled the heating element inside our kettle. This makes life a heck of a lot easier during the brew process because you’re not fumbling around with handheld thermometers or stovetop heating elements.

But before we can simply set the temperature on our control panel, we needed to build a schematic so we could better understand how all the components were required to be wired up. And before we wired anything up, one of the first steps we needed to take as we built our schematics – was making sure we created the appropriate symbols. In Episode 3, we discuss the basic topic of creating a new symbol for our temperature modules that are inside the electrical panel.

So be sure to check out Episode 3 in our “Brewing with Electricity” mini-series where we start the mashing phase to create our wort and discuss the various methods of symbol creation within SOLIDWORKS Electrical.

If you are still looking for more great information on SOLIDWORKS Electrical including topics such as “How to create a template” or “Understanding Installations,” check out our videos on these more detailed topics at my.solidworks.com – simply search for Electric Brewery. You can also access past episodes by clicking on Episode 1 and Episode 2.

If you’re a fan of twitter, you can follow me @SWECAD.

Author information

JP Emanuele
JP Emanuele
JP is a Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, North America.

The post Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery: Starting our Mash appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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6 Ways to Reduce Development Costs with Industrial 3D Printing http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/6-ways-reduce-development-costs-industrial-3d-printing.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/6-ways-reduce-development-costs-industrial-3d-printing.html#respond Mon, 15 May 2017 14:43:12 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32459
Get some tips from the experts at Proto Labs on how to cut your product developments costs with industrial 3D printing.

Author information

Eric Utley

Eric Utley

Eric is a 3D printing applications engineer at Proto Labs

The post 6 Ways to Reduce Development Costs with Industrial 3D Printing appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Most product developers and engineers have gained a solid working knowledge of 3D printing over the years. Also known as additive manufacturing, the term covers a range of technologies, such as filament-based fused deposition modeling (FDM) that creates plastic prototypes, laser-curing processes that make parts from photopolymer resins, and powder-bed fusion machines that produce fully dense metal and plastic components.

A direct metal laser sintering machine fuses together powder to form each layer of a 3D printing design.

 

All offer great potential for cost reductions when prototyping. Two of these technologies—selective laser sintering (SLS) and direct metal laser sintering (DMLS)—can cut costs through accelerated production; reduced tooling costs and work-in-process; less waste; and parts that remain strong despite being lighter in weight. SLS and DMLS are especially important to those thousands of companies that are 3D printing end-use parts. Examples abound:

– Lockheed Martin’s Juno spacecraft, currently in orbit around Jupiter, carries a dozen 3D-printed waveguide support brackets.
– Activated Research Company used DMLS to develop a radical new design for its Polyarc gas chromatography catalytic microreactor, bringing it to market in just 15 months.
– Raytheon uses 3D printing for rocket engines, fins, and control system components for guided missiles, producing parts in hours rather than days.
– Boeing set a world record in 2016 by building the largest 3D-printed item ever made, a fixture used in the construction of its 777 airplane, reportedly cutting weeks off its manufacturing time.
– Brunswick Corporation used 3D printing for air conditioning grills on its Sea Ray yachts, eliminating the need for disposable tooling and speeding product development.

In these cases, results included greater functionality, lower weight, reduced manufacturing costs, and often times all three. Here are six design considerations that made these benefits possible:

1. Optimize the Design
Well-designed 3D printed parts follow many of the same rules as those made with injection molding. Use gradual transitions between adjoining surfaces. Eliminate large differences in cross section and part volume. Avoid sharp corners that often create residual stress in the finished workpiece. Watch that thin unsupported walls don’t grow too tall, or else buckling or warping may occur. Also, surfaces with shallow angles tend to leave ugly “stair-stepping” that makes them unsuitable for cosmetic features—flatten them out where possible.

2. Throw Out Tradition
The most dramatic 3D-printed part designs leverage 3D’s ability to create “organic” shapes, such as honeycombs and complex matrices. Don’t be afraid to use these shapes, provided doing so creates a lighter, stronger part. Nor should you fear placing holes—lots of them—into your part design. With traditional manufacturing, drilling holes in a solid block of material increases part cost and waste. Not so in the additive world, where more holes mean less powder and less processing time. Just remember, 3D printed holes don’t need to be round. Quite often, an elliptical, hexagonal, or free-form hole shape would better suit the part design and be easier to print.

3. Consider Next Steps in the Design Cycle
Just because you can print parts with lots of holes, however, doesn’t mean you should, especially if the plan is to make lots of such parts later on. Because 3D printing offers tremendous design flexibility, it’s easy to paint yourself into a corner by not considering how parts will be manufactured post-prototyping. Based on our examples at the start of this design tip, an increasing number of companies are finding 3D printing suitable for end-use parts, but many parts will transition from printing to machining, molding, or casting as production volumes grow. That’s why it’s important to perform a design for manufacturability analysis early on in the design cycle, assuring cost-effective production throughout the part’s life cycle.

4. Avoid Secondary Operations
Plastic parts produced via SLS need no support structures during the build process, so post-processing is usually limited to bead blasting, painting, reaming, and tapping of holes, and machining of critical part features. DMLS, on the other hand, often requires extensive scaffold-like structures to support and control movement of the metal workpiece—without them, surfaces may curl and warp. This is especially true with overhanging geometries—wide T-shapes, for example, which require build supports beneath the arms, and will have to be machined or ground away, thus increasing cost and lead time. The story is similar but less dramatic with SL, where cured resin supports are easily removed with a hand grinder and some sandpaper. Where possible, Proto Labs will work to orient parts in such a way to reduce these overhangs and other unfriendly features, but part designers can help by minimizing their use in the first place.

Some parts produced with DMLS require hand finishing, as seen here. Smarter part design can help minimize this extra post-production step that can add cost and time.

5. Watch the Tolerances
Designers and engineers should avoid “over-tolerancing” their parts—doing so may force them to be built using thinner layers (increasing build time and cost), and will in many cases call for secondary machining operations to meet overly zealous print dimensions. And because 3D printing offers so many opportunities for part count reduction, there’s less need for super accurate fits between mating surfaces anyway, just one more example of how this technology reduces manufacturing costs.

6. Look at the Big Picture
3D printed parts might cost more up front, but don’t let that scare you. With additive, you have tremendous possibility for part count reduction, reduced weight and greater structural integrity, lower assembly costs, internal passages for cooling or wiring, and other part features that are not possible with traditional part designs. Also, keep in mind that fixtures, molds, and other types of tooling are not needed with 3D printing, eliminating costs that might not be directly associated to the price of the individual piece part. Focusing on the part’s price tag, rather than product functionality and “the big picture,” may leave you designing the same parts you did yesterday, eliminating opportunities to reduce overall manufacturing costs.

Download our Industrial 3D Printing for Dummies book to learn more about designing for additive manufacturing processes and how it can be leveraged throughout product development.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author information

Eric Utley
Eric Utley
Eric is a 3D printing applications engineer at Proto Labs

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Schooled in SOLIDWORKS: Discover Handy Composer Features You Never Knew Existed http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/schooled-solidworks-discover-handy-composefeatures-never-knew-existed.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/schooled-solidworks-discover-handy-composefeatures-never-knew-existed.html#respond Fri, 12 May 2017 11:00:51 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32420
Ratchet-up your SOLIDWORKS skills as our inside experts reveal features you never knew existed. In this month’s webinar, find out how SOLIDWORKS Composer slashes the time you need to spend creating technical documentation, user guides, web content and more. The

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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Ratchet-up your SOLIDWORKS skills as our inside experts reveal features you never knew existed. In this month’s webinar, find out how SOLIDWORKS Composer slashes the time you need to spend creating technical documentation, user guides, web content and more.

The best way to learn is to do. The second best? Beg, steal or borrow knowledge from people who are aces in their field. SOLIDWORKS is holding a series of webinars hosted by the crème de la crème in our company. It’s your chance to hear from the people who know SOLIDWORKS like the back of their hand… The next best thing to sitting in a room with them.

Each month an expert member of our team will share unmissable advice on how to get the most from SOLIDWORKS. You will learn to use our product not just as a design tool, but as a means to ease business challenges and ignite progress towards your goals. Sit back and power-up your knowledge of the world’s most advanced 3D design software. Ask questions at the end.
But hurry, you need to register your interest to benefit from the inside knowledge by 18th May.
This month we talk to Maykel van Oirschot, SOLIDWORKS Technical Manager for the Benelux region.

Here’s a Q&A to introduce his webinar…
>> Register your interest now

 

1. Please introduce yourself…

Hi, my name is Maykel van Oirschot and I’m 44 years old. My career in SOLIDWORKS began in 1997 while working as a reseller in the Netherlands. Then from 2000 to 2005 I worked as a mechanical engineer for a number of exciting companies. Yet I loved training others, so rejoined the SOLIDWORKS reseller in 2006. Since 2015 I have been working in my dream job at Dassault Systemes as a Territory Technical Manager. Essentially I am responsible for supporting all SOLIDWORKS resellers in the Benelux.

2. What is your webinar about, who is it for and why should I attend?

This webinar is about SOLIDWORKS Composer. I want to show how easily you can create documentation from your existing 3D data. It’s great for writing operation manuals, assembly instructions, web content and much more. SOLIDWORKS Composer has been designed especially for non-CAD users. Anyone who is responsible for writing documentation will discover the ease of creating content for their product.

3. What’s your best quick tip or trick for anyone considering using SOLIDWORKS Composer?

That’s an easy one. Without doubt I would recommend creating “company styles” that fit your product branding. In this way you won’t have to change the colours of arrows, line thicknesses, play buttons and so on, each time you use them. All it takes is a few clicks to create your styles.

4. What’s your favourite feature of SOLIDWORKS Composer?

That checkbox called “Views” on the “Multiple” tab. Small but immeasurably useful.

5. What makes this feature so good?

What happens if your product is tweaked after you have produced the documentation? Amending the images can take forever. Not so with the multiples feature. Instead of replacing each image manually, just update the images in SOLIDWORKS and they can be automatically replaced in your documentation. It slashes the time and effort associated with documentation production.

6. When does your webinar take place?

9.30-10am on 18th May. Can’t make it? No biggie! Register your interest anyway and you’ll be notified when the video of the webinar is available to stream.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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Engineering the Perfect Pint from Farm to Glass http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/engineering-perfect-pint-farm-glass.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/engineering-perfect-pint-farm-glass.html#respond Thu, 11 May 2017 12:30:30 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32309
Explore the engineering and design innovations responsible for driving the brewing design chain from the farm to your glass.

Author information

Mike Fearon

Mike Fearon

Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post Engineering the Perfect Pint from Farm to Glass appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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For those who love beer, there’s not much in this world more enjoyable than cracking open a refreshing can of your favorite beverage on a warm day. The simplest joys in life are often the most satisfying.

While enjoying beer is easy, the journey that transforms hops, barley and water into the product you purchase at the store can be complex. It’s easy to forget, especially when you’re focused on savoring your drink of choice, that a lot of work goes into your favorite beer as it travels from the farm to your glass.

Although brewing itself hasn’t changed much over the centuries, technological advancements are responsible for streamlining the brewing process, making it more uniform and allowing beer lovers everywhere to sample everything from hometown craft brews to international favorites from around the world. It’s a great time to be alive.

Chances are you don’t think about it every time you open a bottle, but engineering and design play an immensely important role in the beer paradise in which we currently reside. For that reason, we wanted to highlight the contributions made to the brewing process that may not always be top of mind. Beer’s journey to your glass has many steps. From farming to brewing and packaging to transportation, SOLIDWORKS users are making major contributions to the brewing booms.

I invite you to grab your favorite beer and join us as we follow the brewing process from Farm to Glass. You’ll see interesting companies engineering amazing products across agriculture, industrial equipment, transportation, and consumer goods. It’s the brewing circle of life, and in addition to delivering us with delicious beer; these businesses have another commonalities: they bring their ideas to life with SOLIDWORKS.

Visit the SOLIDWORKS Farm to Glass website to explore how engineering and design software are making the modern brewing process possible. Through demo videos, white papers, feature articles, and customer testimonials, you’ll experience how great companies and SOLIDWORKS users are creating groundbreaking products – and in some cases, changing the way we enjoy our beverage of choice.

Author information

Mike Fearon
Mike Fearon
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post Engineering the Perfect Pint from Farm to Glass appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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The Real Cost of Mismanaged Data http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/real-cost-mismanaged-data.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/real-cost-mismanaged-data.html#respond Wed, 10 May 2017 12:00:45 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32403
This blog encourages readers to watch the on-demand webinar on the real costs of not having a data management system.

Author information

Kurt Lundstedt

Kurt Lundstedt

Product Manager - PDM Solutions at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post The Real Cost of Mismanaged Data appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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In case you missed it there was a great SOLIDWORKS 22-Minute webinar last month entitled The Real Cost of Mismanaged Data, which focused on how companies can improve their design and engineering efficiency by adopting SOLIDWORKS PDM. Now many of you may say that Product Data Management (PDM) software is too expensive, takes too much time to set up and your engineers and designers won’t use it because it will slow down their productivity. Let me try to convince you otherwise.

First of all many of you probably already own SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard, which has been included with SOLIDWORKS Professional and Premium licenses since the SOLIDWORKS 2016 release. Second, your SOLIDWORKS Value-Added Reseller can help you get it set up and working in just a few days. Third, your engineers and designers are probably spending more time manually managing and searching for files then they would using if you were using SOLIDWORKS PDM.

Here are the main advantages of SOLIDWORKS PDM that were highlighted in the webinar:

  •  Find it Fast (Searching): Many of us (yes I’m guilty too) are browsers when it comes to looking for files. We hunt and peck through folders looking for the right file. If we know the file name, we can use the search capabilities in Windows, which may be slow and will most likely return multiple files with the same or similar names because we saved different versions to different folders. Now how many of us browse the internet? Well no one because it really can’t be done; you need to run a search first, then you browse the results. This same workflow can be accomplished with SOLIDWORKS PDM. If you know something about the file, you can search on it, and when you get your results, you have more relevant data available to decide if it is in fact what you were looking for. This includes data like part numbers, descriptions, current release state and even dynamic previews.
  •  

  • Smart File Management (Moving and renaming): As a SOLIDWORKS user or as a user of any file-based system that has relationships between files knows that moving and renaming files can be tricky. The issue gets compounded when one file is referenced by several others. To start, how do you know where a file is used? That information may be in a separate system like ERP/MRP. With SOLIDWORKS PDM a file can be renamed and moved just like you would in Windows Explorer because it is Windows Explorer.
  •  

  • Keep Changes Easily (Versioning): How do you save versions? Many of you may answer we don’t; we just keep one version of a file. While this may be a clean and easy method, it was probably adopted because easily keeping past versions took too much time and resulted in lots of duplicate files. Others may need to keep older versions because products in the field still use them. So various methods are employed like using Pack and Go, creating folders and copying each version to them, or renaming files with the version information included (in case you forgot see point two above). SOLIDWORKS PDM automatically creates a new version each time a file is checked in and remembers which versions of parts, assemblies and drawings go together. In the 2017 release we introduce version overwrite so you don’t need to store a new version every time.
  •  

  •  A Full History (Time traveling): What good would previous versions be if you couldn’t easily access them and know who, why and when created them? SOLIDWORKS PDM makes this extremely easy. When working in SOLIDWOKS you can load previous versions into your session to see what a design looked like in the past and determine interchangeability of new versions of parts with older versions of an assembly. You can even use the compare functions in SOLIDWORKS Utilities with different version of the same file. This really useful for finding small changes in geometry, features and properties.

 

Still not convinced or you want to see SOLIDWORKS PDM in action? Then please visit our website where you can view a recording of the webinar and find out more information on SOLIDWORKS products. Here’s the link to our Data Management recorded webinars: http://www.solidworks.com/sw/resources/data-management-recorded-webinars.htm

Author information

Kurt Lundstedt
Kurt Lundstedt
Product Manager - PDM Solutions at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post The Real Cost of Mismanaged Data appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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LED iBond is Here to Brighten Your Future http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/led-ibond-brighten-future.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/led-ibond-brighten-future.html#respond Tue, 09 May 2017 13:18:48 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=30826 LED iBond is here to brighten your future Feature
The internal combustion engine. The jet engine. The toasted sandwich maker. Three of history’s greatest inventions. To that list, you can add Thomas Edison’s incandescent light bulb. Electric lighting paved the way for cheaper illumination, which has eventually developed beyond

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post LED iBond is Here to Brighten Your Future appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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LED iBond is here to brighten your future Feature

The internal combustion engine.

The jet engine.

The toasted sandwich maker.

Three of history’s greatest inventions. To that list, you can add Thomas Edison’s incandescent light bulb. Electric lighting paved the way for cheaper illumination, which has eventually developed beyond the energy-inefficient and cumbersome filament style bulbs to modern LEDs. Brighter, more efficient and far sleeker, LED lighting is the streamlined alternative to the unwieldy light bulb of yore. And LED iBond take LED lighting to its most futuristic.

LED iBond is here to brighten your future Light
Who is LED iBond?

Danish lighting company LED iBond has a simple USP: wringing every last strain of light from minimal space. With patented technology it’s spatially economic lighting is used in business and public areas, small and large. From shelf lighting to harbor bridges, it’s ultra-thin lighting brightens whatever project it’s briefed on.


Less is more: how SOLIDWORKS has helped LED iBond

As dedicated to saving seconds as it is space, LED iBond credit SOLIDWORKS with slashing both design and manufacture time. But how? Well with its calculations and blueprints loaded on to SOLIDWORKS, the team has been able to make decisions on materials far more swiftly than it was previously able. Of course navigating its fledgling products in 3D means the design team can exploit every millimeter of space available – championing minimalist style to maximum advantage.

LED iBond is here to brighten your future Light 2


Throwing the spotlight on new products

LED iBond has also incorporated SOLIDWORKS Composer into the design and marketing process of its business. Think of Composer as a visual communication tool that translates SOLIDWORKS CAD data into high-resolution photorealistic product images, with full 3D and zooms flexibility. That means the LED iBond team can share detailed images of its designs to both clients and manufacturers. In a nutshell: clients can see what they are getting; manufacturers can see how it’s built.


A no-brainer for new hires and subcontractors

SOLIDWORKS was a natural choice for LED iBond. Thanks to the software program’s popularity in the design field, new graduate engineers often come equipped with SOLIDWORKS knowledge having used it as part of their education and engineering training. In fact using SOLIDWORKS often means new hires can make a seamless transition from university and hit the ground running in their new job. SOLIDWORKS’ ubiquity also means LED iBond can share designs far more effectively with manufacturing subcontractors. This drastically reduces the likelihood of mistakes at the manufacturing end, saving time and money.


A bright future for LED iBond

LED iBond continue to invent and develop revolutionary ultra-efficient lighting.  We’re happy to be shining a light of our own on its design process.

 

LED iBOND 3DS Version from Martin J Pickering on Vimeo.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post LED iBond is Here to Brighten Your Future appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Flying Can be Fun with Zenith Aircraft Company http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/flying-can-fun-zenith-aircraft-company.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/flying-can-fun-zenith-aircraft-company.html#respond Fri, 05 May 2017 12:30:25 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32394
Climb in the cockpit with Zenith Aircraft Company and learn how it designs homebuilt kit planes for sport pilots.

Author information

Mike Fearon

Mike Fearon

Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post Flying Can be Fun with Zenith Aircraft Company appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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When think of the dawn of aviation, flight was fun and exciting. Fast forward to today and you’re probably not looking forward to your next plane ride. Imagine if flying were actually enjoyable. For Zenith Aircraft Company, excitement is the journey and not just the destination.

Founded in 1992, Zenith designs homebuilt kit planes for sport pilots. Yes, believe it or not, you can build and fly your very own aircraft. “When most people think of flying, it’s for transportation purposes and not for a joy ride; this is especially true when you fly commercial,” said Sebastien Heintz, founder of Zenith Aircraft Company. “On the sport aviation side, transportation is not your primary goal. You’re flying because you enjoy the experience. It’s similar to driving a classic car or motorcycle versus a commuter vehicle. With a classic car, you can take it out on the weekend and drive without much of a destination. You enjoy the vehicle, the weather and yourself. That’s how sport pilots approach aviation. You can obviously use your aircraft to get from Point A to Point B, but it’s more than just for transportation. Sport aviation is more about sport than transport.”

 

If flying for fun wasn’t a novel enough concept, how about actually building your own aircraft? That’s where Zenith Aircraft comes in to help. The company’s sport aircraft kits have roots in the 1960s when Sebastien’s father, Chris Heintz, earned his engineering degree and actually worked on designing the Concorde. Chris was keen on owning his own airplane, but supporting a young family meant buying a plane was a pipe dream. So as many hungry engineers do, however, Chris decided to go out and build his dream. He designed a simple-to-build, two-seat, all metal aircraft that eventually spawned its own industry. Chris’s friends, who were also flying enthusiasts, loved the design and asked for blueprints of their own and often times needed hard-to-obtain parts that Chris would provide. From here, the DIY aircraft kit industry was born.

Building a sport aircraft is much like flying one. It’s all about the journey. “What I sell is not a finished airplane,” Sebastien said. “If you buy a puzzle, you don’t buy it for the finished picture. You make the purchase because you want to enjoy the activity of putting the puzzle together. Airplane kits are similar. If you want a finished airplane, don’t buy a kit. But if you enjoy the process of building things, then you’ll love a kit.”

How long does it take to build your own plane? Well that varies from person to person. “We say about 500 hours of assembly time,” Sebastien explained. “People do not try to be efficient while building our kits. Remember, they’re looking to take in the experience. Most of our customers have day jobs, so they’ll spend about one to two years building the craft, assembling it over nights and weekends.”

Motivation is key to ensuring customers complete the process. This is where Zenith’s focus on quality instructions really comes into play. The goal is to provide an easy-to-build, easy-to-maintain aircraft, with simple instructions. “We want people to see some progress after spending just a few hours assembling,” Sebastien stated. “We make sure the instructions are easy to follow, so mistakes are avoided even with a basic skill level. I find that if you see real progress, even after one or two hours, there’s built-in motivation to go on.”

Zenith has been using SOLIDWORKS to design its kits for about four years. “Using SOLIDWORKS over 2D CAD allows us to access a lot more information and enables us to visualize designs virtually as opposed to out in the shop,” Sebastien said. “This is especially important for customers. They can really see what and how they’re going to build.”

“From a design standpoint, SOLIDWORKS makes it more efficient to develop new designs from prior versions,” Sebastien explained. “Like most designs, we’re not starting from scratch. There’s no need to do this when planes are still flying the same way. However, SOLIDWORKS helps modify designs, and we can test these updates more efficiently in a computer than in a physical prototype. I’ve been really impressed with the ability to design more efficiently. Now, we’re creating and modeling at the same time, which is much more efficient.”

 

Now we understand the design work and fun that goes into assembling a safe, simple-to-fly aircraft kit, but what does it take to get your plane off the ground? “The FAA makes it relatively easy to build and own your own airplane,” Sebastien stated. “The FAA does a final inspection on the plane, making sure it’s airworthy, but they otherwise let you build your plane as you want. The other hurdle is obtaining a sport pilot license, which was created to lower the barriers of entry into aviation and make piloting more affordable and accessible compared to the traditional private pilot license.”

After your aircraft is registered and you’ve earned a sport pilot’s license, you’re ready to take to the skies. Sebastien discussed one of his favorite flight paths, from Missouri to Florida, for an annual visit to the U.S. Sport Aviation Expo. “I take three or four stops along the way. We fly from about 1,000 to 3,000 feet above the ground. This is great for sightseeing and it feels like a fun road trip only you get to see more from the sky. We’re also blessed by having the opportunity to visit fun airports with good people. A public airport is like any other public facility; it’s free to use and a great resource.”

If you’re ready to embrace the journey and make flying fun, check out Zenith Aircraft Company and get ready to fly the friendly skies – just like our special guest co-pilot, SOLIDWORKS CEO Gian Paolo Bassi, who captured the below footage:

 

Author information

Mike Fearon
Mike Fearon
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

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SOLIDWORKS Sponsors DriveWorks World 2017 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/solidworks-sponsors-driveworks-world-2017.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/solidworks-sponsors-driveworks-world-2017.html#respond Thu, 04 May 2017 12:00:32 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32371
This blog discusses events at the recent DriveWorks Live event.

Author information

DriveWorks

DriveWorks is proven technology for automating repetitive tasks to generate accurate manufacturing drawings, 3D models and sales documents quickly and easily. From a single seat to enterprise-wide deployments, there is a DriveWorks Automation product to suit the needs of most companies creating custom products. DriveWorksXpress is included with every seat of SolidWorks, and DriveWorks has been a SolidWorks Certified Gold Partner since 2002.

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DriveWorks design automation for SOLIDWORKS and online 3D CPQ software are used by companies large and small. Whether you’re an engineer who needs design automation to automate your SOLIDWORKS models, or a company wanting to provide a product configurator and guided selling for your sales teams, distributors and even customers, DriveWorks software is the ultimate choice for SOLIDWORKS.

There are three DriveWorks products – DriveWorksXpress, DriveWorks Solo and DriveWorks Pro. Each product is a SOLIDWORKS Gold Partner Product and DriveWorksXpress is already included in every license of SOLIDWORKS. All DriveWorks products are modular and scalable, so you can implement DriveWorks and grow your projects at your own pace, adding additional capabilities as and when you need them.


Every year, DriveWorks holds a technical event for all DriveWorks users, resellers and partners. DriveWorks World 2017 saw over 120 people from the DriveWorks community gather in Atlanta for a week of learning, networking and seeing what’s new in DriveWorks 15. As DriveWorks is a key SOLIDWORKS Gold Partner Product, we were there as proud sponsors of the event.

With so much functionality and so many ways to use DriveWorks, the week was split into two tracks:
Track 1 was dedicated to DriveWorks Pro Essentials Training & Certification, giving attendees the chance to become Certified DriveWorks Professionals (CDWP).
Track 2 focused on DriveWorks Pro Advanced Training, covering topics such as Advanced SOLIDWORKS Automation, Integration, External Data, Templates and more.

On Tuesday, DriveWorks CEO, Glen Smith, also led an additional track on Configure Price Quote (CPQ). This was an important track because CPQ is an increasing trend in the manufacturing industry, with companies needing a CPQ solution in order to meet the demand for custom products efficiently and profitably. A DriveWorks CPQ solution allows you to generate quotes in record time, reduce the cost of custom designs, send follow up emails automatically and show off your configurable products in 3D online. Have a go with some of the configurator examples at www.driveworkslive.com.

During the same week that DriveWorks World was in Atlanta, NATLSWUG was  also holding its very first SOLIDWORKS User Group Meeting, in Atlanta! With so many SOLIDWORKS users, resellers, and some SWUGN Group Leaders at DriveWorks World, it was a great opportunity for them to head over to the meeting together.

On Thursday the DriveWorks team revealed What’s New in DriveWorks 15. With 70 new features and 168 improvements and customer enhancements, DriveWorks 15 is another really exciting release. All of the new functionality makes it even easier to Configure & Automate with DriveWorks. Here are just a few of the enhancements:
– A new CPQ template has been added so you can quickly and easily set up a custom CPQ solution.
– Easier responsive form design for use across multiple devices.
– Improved project analysis to make your configurators run even smoother.
– Huge 3D preview improvements so you can really show off your products in immersive 3D.

For more details of What’s New in DriveWorks 15, check out the online help file. Customers were also invited to take to the stage on Thursday to showcase how they are using DriveWorks. Presenters ranged from sheet metal fabricators to manufacturers of canning systems, emergency vehicles and custom orthotics.

Every company uses DriveWorks in a different way and each configurator is unique. The user presentations allowed attendees to learn from each other and pick up ideas for their own configurators.

Watch the highlights from DriveWorks World in Atlanta below.

 

You can see and read more on the DriveWorks blog.

Maria Sarkar of DriveWorks said, “A huge thank you to SOLIDWORKS for sponsoring DriveWorks World and joining us in Atlanta for the event. We’re proud of our technology and the way so many customers use SOLIDWORKS and DriveWorks together to work smarter, seeing this all come together in a week-long event is brilliant.”

Author information

DriveWorks
DriveWorks is proven technology for automating repetitive tasks to generate accurate manufacturing drawings, 3D models and sales documents quickly and easily. From a single seat to enterprise-wide deployments, there is a DriveWorks Automation product to suit the needs of most companies creating custom products. DriveWorksXpress is included with every seat of SolidWorks, and DriveWorks has been a SolidWorks Certified Gold Partner since 2002.

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Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery Part 2: Preparation http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/brewing-electricity-solidworks-brewery-part-2-preparation.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/brewing-electricity-solidworks-brewery-part-2-preparation.html#respond Tue, 02 May 2017 13:00:47 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32355
Preparation for brewing a hoppy IPA is underway in the SOLIDWORKS Brewery. Learn how you can implement the right plans to ensure your electrical projects are in a position to succeed.

Author information

JP Emanuele

JP Emanuele

JP is a Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, North America.

The post Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery Part 2: Preparation appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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So if you’ve been following along over the past few weeks, we embarked on the journey of crafting a delicious home brew. And not just any brew though – a very
pungent and hoppy India Pale Ale (which, unfortunately, I still haven’t had a chance to try). Once we came up with our plan to conduct the first ever “SOLIDWORKS Brew Day,” there were several action items that we needed to complete before we even poured water into the kettles.

First we obviously needed to pick out the style of beer we wanted to brew. Without hesitation and before Earl (the head brewer) could even finish asking the question, we knew that it had to be an IPA. Next, came researching and developing the perfect recipe. This took some time, and depended heavily on the available ingredients from the vendor. Once the ingredients were purchased, we opted to make a what is known as a “yeast starter.” This step supports faster fermentation (plus a few additional benefits – such as pitching a higher cell count, and to simply verify the yeast is a good batch). One additional task before brewing, involved cleaning and sanitizing our equipment which can be a tedious task, but an absolute necessary one.

All of these so-called action items could probably be classified as preparations for our brew day. Without all of our prep-work, we still would’ve been able to make beer, but it’d probably be a mediocre one.

The same goes for preparing our electrical projects. There are a few important steps we recommend taking in order to use SOLIDWORKS Electrical effectively and efficiently.
The first step is working with our Value-Added Reseller and creating an implementation plan. This plan will benefit us by standardizing and streamlining our design process. Within this plan, there are several smaller items that may be beneficial for us to set up – including our wire manager, PLC configuration manager, ERP database connection, or simply adding our existing symbol library into our new SOLIDWORKS Electrical database.

For more information on this process, check out Episode 2 in our “Brewing with Electricity” mini-series where we show the preparations and planning we undertook while creating both our delicious homebrew and our detailed SOLIDWORKS Electrical home brewery schematic package.

 

If you are still looking for more great information on SOLIDWORKS Electrical including topics such as “How to create a template” or “Understanding Installations,” check out our videos on these more detailed topics at my.solidworks.com – simply search for Electric Brewery.

If you’re a fan of twitter, you can follow me @SWECAD

Author information

JP Emanuele
JP Emanuele
JP is a Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, North America.

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The Best Solution Should Come with the Best Resource: Unlock MySolidWorks Professional When You Purchase SOLIDWORKS http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/best-solution-come-best-resource-unlock-mysolidworks-professional-purchase-solidworks.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/05/best-solution-come-best-resource-unlock-mysolidworks-professional-purchase-solidworks.html#respond Mon, 01 May 2017 12:30:44 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31036
MySolidWorks can help you be more productive by connecting you with relevant SOLIDWORKS content and services – anytime, anywhere, on any device. With MySolidWorks you can get answers about SOLIDWORKS, learn more and stay up to date with all the latest content from your reseller and the SOLIDWORKS community.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post The Best Solution Should Come with the Best Resource: Unlock MySolidWorks Professional When You Purchase SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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MySolidWorks is the online hub for over a million SOLIDWORKS users worldwide and tens of thousands of users use it every day to learn something new about SOLIDWORKS, to connect with the SOLIDWORKS community, or prepare for their certification exams.

Now through December 30, 2017 you can get more than just the best CAD solution when you purchase SOLIDWORKS with subscription. You can also unlock the best resource to help you design faster, and smarter with a free one-year subscription to MySolidWorks Professional (a $360 value). This offer is eligible for each new license of SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional, Premium, SOLIDWORKS PDM or SOLIDWORKS VISUALIZE you purchase with subscription.mysolidworks-visualize-course

Help your team get up to speed or jumpstart your SOLIDWORKS knowledge today. With the added value of MySolidWorks Professional you get:

  • Extended online training accessible anytime and anywhere, on any device
  • Over 1,000 online product tutorial videos with access to the most popular SOLIDWORKS training content including SOLIDWORKS Essentials, Advanced Part Modeling, Assembly Modeling, Electrical Design, Sheet Metal Design, Mold Design, SOLIDWORKS Visualize and more.
  • Access to SOLIDWORKS certification prep courses designed to help you stand out professionally
  • In addition to the Certified SOLIDWORKS Associate (CSWA) preparation course, access all certification prep with CSWP, CSWE, and CSWPA preparation courses (Drawing Tools, Mold Tools, Sheetmetal, Surfacing, Weldments)
  • The latest SOLIDWORKS community news and resources – keeping you up to date.

MySolidWorks Professional adds value to your investment in subscription. It is the place to get the best answers to your questions about SOLIDWORKS® in one location. See below for more information about the added-value of MySolidWorks Professional.

mysw_pro_chart.png

Buy SOLIDWORKS with subscription by December 30th, 2017 and access over 1,000 product video tutorials at no additional cost for up to 12 months. Take advantage of this limited-time offer by contacting your reseller today.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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Put Your 3D Printing Skills to the Test at First Ever Additive Manufacturing Hackathon http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/try-3d-printing-first-ever-additive-manufacturing-hackathon.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/try-3d-printing-first-ever-additive-manufacturing-hackathon.html#respond Thu, 27 Apr 2017 13:00:36 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32320
This blog provides information on the Dassault Systemes' Science in the Age of Experience's Additive Manufacturing Hackathon event in Chicago.

Author information

Mark Rushton

Mark Rushton

Mark is a Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS.

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Additive Manufacturing or 3D Printing has had a huge amount of hype in the last few years and in many cases has not lived up to expectation. This is because it is not a miracle manufacturing method for making anything and everything, but a different way of making things that has reached a maturity where for certain applications it is commercially viable. However, as with all manufacturing methods, design for manufacture is crucial. Understanding how that method works is key to that. For more information on how the different types of additive manufacturing work, interesting articles and webinars check out the new section on the SOLIDWORKS website at http://www.solidworks.com/am.

To put some of this theory into practice why not attend the….
ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING DESIGN HACKATHON, May 15-17th, Chicago.

When designing and manufacturing load-bearing production parts with additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D-printing, designers and manufacturers are facing many challenges including how to trade off the strength and stiffness and in-service performances with part weight given the freedom from subtractive manufacturing constraints; how to design organic and hollow structures such as the lattice structures that are now printable with AM; how to consider new design constraints and requirements, such as overhang and support structures; how to reduce part distortion during printing process and close the gap between as-designed and as-manufactured parts.

Dassault Systèmes is glad to announce that we are hosting our first ever Additive Manufacturing Hackathon in Chicago from May 15th – May 17th. For those of you who love design challenges and can only learn by hacking your designs and seeing them come to life this event is a perfect fit for you. All hardware and software will be provided to the attendees. We will announce Hackathon winners (and awards) during our annual users’ conference: Science in the Age of Experience. The conference runs parallel to the AM Hackathon.

Attendees will be provided four design challenges to choose from. Let’s have a look at one of them in slightly more detail.

Design an Aircraft Sensor Assembly: An aircraft sensor assembly, as shown in Figure 1, is examined and to be re-designed with the goal to obtain a stiff but light-weight structure. In service, the sensor, which is the tubular, blue structure in Figure 1: Aircraft sensor assembly Figure 2: Sensor and supporting ‘wing’ Figure 2, is subjected to airflow, attached to a ‘wing-like’ support structure, marked in red in Figure 2.

You will have to develop a lattice structure to stiffen the interior of the ‘wing’ (the red region in Figures 2 and 3), through which the sensor tube is attached to the fuselage. The sensor itself and the fuselage attachment bracket are non-design region, meaning they remain unchanged. Within the design, you must reserve a small duct to allow for cables to pass from the sensor into the aircraft. This duct may be lined, creating a tube as in Figure 3, or it may just be a cylindrical void region.

We’ve taken a first pass at it already. Perhaps you get something as in the image below, or surprise us with some more imaginative, organic. Don’t forget though it has to be functional.

If you are up the challenge of designing and then making the part, then join us. Adaptiv Corporation is sponsoring the event with a Markforged Mark 2 printer. So you might just walk out with a prototype as bragging rights. And if you win, then a bigger award awaits you.

To register for the Hackathon go here: https://www.3ds.com/events/science-in-the-age-of-experience/registration/ or contact Samantha Lindsay: Samantha.LINDSAY@3ds.com.

Author information

Mark Rushton
Mark Rushton
Mark is a Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS.

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Meta AR Headset Might Help Designers Break Through CAD’s Screen-based Paradigm http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/meta-ar-headset-might-help-designers-break-cads-screen-based-paradigm.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/meta-ar-headset-might-help-designers-break-cads-screen-based-paradigm.html#respond Wed, 26 Apr 2017 12:00:03 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32335
This blog explains how the Meta AR headset make impact the way engineers and designers collaborate and design products in the future.

Author information

Barbara Schmitz

Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks

Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post Meta AR Headset Might Help Designers Break Through CAD’s Screen-based Paradigm appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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We all live in a 3D world surrounded by 3D objects. When we create or design those objects (or products) around us, however, we’re relegated to sitting in front of a computer’s flat screen and confined to interact with our digital designs through 2D windows, icons, and menus.

Is there a better way? Two technologies that show promise in providing designers with a more intuitive way to interact with their digital designs are augmented reality (AR), which overlays digital content onto the real world, and virtual reality (VR), which immerses users into a fully virtual world. Both technologies have made headway in recent years, thanks to advances in graphics processing power, high-pixel density, but small, displays, low power/portability, lower costs, and most importantly, the overwhelming declaration from gamers, designers, and engineers to break out of 2D worlds.

For the past two years, UX, research, and neuroscience teams at Meta, an augmented reality hardware and software company, have been hard at work creating design guidelines for AR with the goal of contributing to the larger conversation on how AR can enhance our abilities to create, communicate, and collaborate. These guidelines, coupled with its flagship product, the Meta 2 Development Kit, can be used to create applications and tools that enable design participants to more completely understand the functionality of a proposed product in the context of the space it will be in.

What makes the Meta 2 headsets unique is that they are see-through, so the holographic content in the AR environment is displayed as a dynamic layer over the user’s physical surroundings. As a result, users always feel oriented and visually connected to both the people around them and their environment. The Meta 2’s field of view (coming in at 90-degrees) is also much wider than with other devices, such as the HoloLens, and allows users to experience truly immersive AR without needing to move around to see entire holograms. With the Meta 2, users can use natural hand interactions to intuitively move and manipulate holographic content as if they were interacting with real-world objects, and can create and share their own digital content with others, e.g., during design reviews, whether they are in the same room or miles away.

“The way we see it, the Meta 2 Development Kit, and AR more broadly, will significantly enhance the CAD industry’s ability to help its customers deliver better products faster, and at significantly lower costs – a win-win-and-win for everyone involved,” says Christa Olson, Meta’s Head of Product Marketing. “By using the Meta 2 and the high-resolution holographic 3D models it delivers, designers and engineers will be able to greatly enhance every aspect of their workflows, from shortening design reviews to never losing another creative moment or opportunity for inspiration with clients and colleagues.”

With AR predicted to burgeon into a $94–$122 billion market by 2021, compared to $25 billion for the VR market, it’s clear this is a technology with real promise and that startups like Meta seem to have the passion and commitment to be an important part of creating this new computing platform that could radically change the way designers collaborate and create new products in the future.

Author information

Barbara Schmitz
Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks
Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

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SOLIDWORKS and The Ex Zone Prove an Explosive Combination http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/solidworks-ex-zone-prove-explosive-combination.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/solidworks-ex-zone-prove-explosive-combination.html#respond Tue, 25 Apr 2017 13:11:40 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=30830 SOLIDWORKS and The Ex Zone Prove an Explosive Combination Still
Explosions: great if you’re watching a James Bond film, potentially lethal everywhere else. As such, industries who work with the potential for detonation need scientific assurance that the companies supplying their equipment are up to the task. Who is The

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS and The Ex Zone Prove an Explosive Combination appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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SOLIDWORKS and The Ex Zone Prove an Explosive Combination Still

Explosions: great if you’re watching a James Bond film, potentially lethal everywhere else. As such, industries who work with the potential for detonation need scientific assurance that the companies supplying their equipment are up to the task.

SOLIDWORKS and The Ex Zone Prove an Explosive Combination Still

Who is The Ex Zone?

Specialist manufacturing company The Ex Zone design and build an extensive range of explosion-proof hazardous area equipment to a worldwide client base, including the oil, petrochemical, gas and chemical industries. That’s a heavy responsibility that requires pin-sharp engineering accuracy.

 

Big bang theory…

All hazardous control systems are different. Every company’s needs vary. Think offshore oil platforms, industrial compounds and the like. Each client requires a bespoke service to suit its situation, particularly important when you consider the geographical differences, which come with their own set of rules and regulations. A customer base that stretches across the planet means serving business in Europe, the United States, the Far East and everywhere in between.

With no universal world standard, laws vary from country to continent. As such, The Ex Zone needed the flexibility to adapt and alter their core designs with ease and minimal fuss. Step forward SOLIDWORKS.

 

Knocking days off manufacturing time

SOLIDWORKS enables The Ex Zone to cater to the customer’s needs during the build process, saving money on a practical build but with the practicality of having a product to test and alter according to the client’s ongoing input. With SOLIDWORKS, The Ex Zone can get illustrations and blueprints modeled and signed off far quicker than before, with no compromising on that crucial aspect that the project relies on -safety.

That’s not all.

By uploading the materials, components, and wiring to the SOLIDWORKS database, The Ex Zone have minimised time spent on creating variations between similar parts. Having a well-stocked library of circuit breakers, terminals and even fasteners such as bolts, has meant that the team is  able to produce bespoke parts for its clients without the fuss or expense of having to re-build brand new physical components for each new commission. Using the configuration tool, changing size, proportions, and material properties with a simple click during the design stage has saved the company days in manufacturing time.

 

SOLIDWORKS and The Ex Zone Prove an Explosive Combination Still

 

What next for The Ex Zone?

Thanks to SOLIDWORKS The Ex Zone has found it’s marketing strategy has been moving much more swiftly, in concurrence with the build process. Using the photo rendering tool, the team have been able to produce photorealistic stills of the build as it goes.

Having the lead time on rival companies is the great business and makes for a bright future. It seems The Ex Zone and SOLIDWORKS make for an explosive combination, in the very best sense of the word!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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Localized Tutorials for SOLIDWORKS Visualize http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/localized-tutorials-solidworks-visualize.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/localized-tutorials-solidworks-visualize.html#respond Thu, 20 Apr 2017 12:00:40 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32254
This blog post announces that SOLIDWORKS Visualize tutorials have been localized into all 14 languages.

Author information

Brian Hillner

Brian Hillner

Brian Hillner is the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager.

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Put down your coffee and hold onto something…because all 16 SOLIDWORKS Visualize tutorials have been localized into all 14 languages! By now, you should be familiar with the Visualize tutorials that have existed on MySolidWorks since February 2016, in English only. Our global team has been hard at work to translate and localize this important training content into the other 13 languages Visualize supports. Now there’s no excuse to use your complimentary seat of Visualize Standard (wink wink).

Click the link below to sign in and discover learning Visualize in your own language:

WATCH THE LOCALIZED VISUALIZE TUTORIALS NOW!

The following languages have fully localized Visualize tutorials. This includes the introduction screens, Visualize interface, quiz questions at the end, and also the speech is in the native language:
· French
· German
· Spanish
· Japanese

These languages have subtitles in the native language, with English speech and Visualize interface:
· Czech
· Italian
· Korean
· Polish
· Portuguese
· Russian
· Turkish
· Chinese-China
· Chinese-Taiwan

For even more text in your desired language, new to the MySolidWorks website, you can also now choose your desired language for the entire site from the main dropdown in the upper right corner! This new feature allows you to select the language for all text throughout MySolidWorks, letting you read all the Visualize lesson descriptions in your native language.

To follow along in SOLIDWORKS Visualize with your native language, go to the Tools > Options window > User Interface tab and select your desired language. Close Visualize and re-launch it to change the entire Visualize interface to your selected language.

Don’t forget to follow SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager @bhillner on twitter for product news and updates, and share your SOLIDWORKS Visualize creations on social media with #swvisualize and #gettinvizzy!

More Resources to get started with SOLIDWORKS Visualize:

DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE SEAT OF SOLIDWORKS VISUALIZE right now to bring your products to market faster than ever before.

WATCH TWO WEBINARS on SOLIDWORKS Visualize and its benefits by SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager Brian Hillner.

CHECK OUT OTHER BLOG POSTS to learn more about the latest news on SOLIDWORKS Visualize.

UPGRADE TO SOLIDWORKS VISUALIZE PROFESSIONAL for an enhanced 3D visualization experience. Contact your Reseller now!

Author information

Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner is the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager.

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Good Things Come in Threes: SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional and Premium http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/good-things-come-threes-solidworks-standard-professional-premium.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/good-things-come-threes-solidworks-standard-professional-premium.html#respond Tue, 18 Apr 2017 12:00:53 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32290
This blog explains the difference between SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional, and Premium configurations.

Author information

Brad Williamson

Brad Williamson is a Senior Technical Manager, and has been helping customers learn and use SOLIDWORKS since 1996. He played drums and toured with original rock band, Abby SomeOne, for several years, and even had a few songs on the radio that you probably never heard. He continues to play actively in the Nashville music scene when not working on the latest SOLIDWORKS demo.

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Many good things come in threes–like fast food: would you like small, medium or large?

Other times, we choose between three different flavors, colors, or levels of amenity. That “good, better, best” concept applies to SOLIDWORKS CAD, which is offered in Standard, Professional, and Premium configurations. But this can be confusing. What’s in each package? Which one do I have? Are there tools I could be using to do my job better?

An easy way to think of it is SOLIDWORKS Standard is built on core capabilities for the casual user. SOLIDWORKS Professional builds upon that with productivity boosters for the everyday user, while SOLIDWORKS Premium adds specialty tools for the power user.

Watch this short video showing the highlights of each package. Chances are you’ll learn something you didn’t know was in the software and perhaps find one or more new tools to help you do your job better.

Good things come in 3’s: SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional, and Premium. If you already own SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium, why not try one new add-in on your next project? If you are a SOLIDWORKS Standard user but would like to experiment with Premium or Professional add-ins, you can try them out by requesting a SOLIDWORKS online trial. Just click here  to get started running SOLIDWORKS Premium right in your browser with no software to install!

Author information

Brad Williamson
Brad Williamson is a Senior Technical Manager, and has been helping customers learn and use SOLIDWORKS since 1996. He played drums and toured with original rock band, Abby SomeOne, for several years, and even had a few songs on the radio that you probably never heard. He continues to play actively in the Nashville music scene when not working on the latest SOLIDWORKS demo.

The post Good Things Come in Threes: SOLIDWORKS Standard, Professional and Premium appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/brewing-electricity-solidworks-brewery-2.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/brewing-electricity-solidworks-brewery-2.html#respond Mon, 17 Apr 2017 17:44:27 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32242
Get an introduction to the Brewing with Electricity series demonstrating how you can electrify your homebrewing efforts with SOLIDWORKS. Expert to learn plenty of design tips and tricks as SOLIDWORKS expert JP Emanuele show you the process of designing an electric brewing system.

Author information

JP Emanuele

JP Emanuele

JP is a Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, North America.

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A few weeks ago I wrote a blog post letting you all in on my fascination with brewing beer – in particular, with the entire brewing process. So in an attempt to publicize my passion for brewing, there were a lot of folks who took advantage of watching one of my two webinars I presented using the digital version of an electric home brewing system. If you missed it, you can watch it right here.

I’ll admit it, creating this assembly was actually a lot of fun – the electrical cabinet with all its components, the insane amount of detail in the kettles, and even building the wort chiller with SOLIDWORKS features such as the helix command (which I never thought – as an electrical guy – I would have needed THAT awesome feature.)

But even after creating the home brewing project, and conducting a couple webinars, I felt like there was still SO much more I could do with the assembly. Maybe I’m being selfish, but I’ve put a lot of work into this project and I didn’t want to see the assembly simply get put on the shelf once our webinars were complete.

It just so happens, that one of my teammates here at SOLIDWORKS actually has very similar brewing equipment to what I built in my digital assembly. So after months of prep work, planning, and coordination, a small team of beer enthusiasts here at SOLIDWORKS, helped me with what has been dubbed as the first ever “SOLIDWORKS Brew Day.”  Over the course of the brew day, we filmed the entire process – trying to capture every single step that was needed in order to create our beer. But of course, simply spending the entire day brewing beer would raise some questions (and some eyebrows). For example, “How does brewing beer, relate to SOLIDWORKS?”

So for each major step in the brewing process, we’ve created detailed videos that encompass how SOLIDWORKS Electrical can relate to our brewing system, but ultimately help when designing components and equipment. Additionally, these videos are not only related to brewing equipment, but ANY equipment that has circuitry incorporated within it. With that, I am thrilled to share with you our introductory video on “Brewing with Electricity.”

 

To take our designs a step further, we’re also producing even more detailed videos that relate to specific features and functions within SOLIDWORKS Electrical and we will be posting those videos on MySolidWorks.com.

I am extremely excited about this interactive project we’re creating and we hope you will be too. So keep an eye out and your taste buds ready for more information about this awesome brewing adventure with The SOLIDWORKS Brewery.

If you’re a fan of Twitter, you can follow me @SWECAD

Author information

JP Emanuele
JP Emanuele
JP is a Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, North America.

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How to Choose the Best Additive Manufacturing Technology for Your Application http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/choose-best-additive-manufacturing-technology-application.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/choose-best-additive-manufacturing-technology-application.html#respond Thu, 13 Apr 2017 12:00:04 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32224
This blog introduces the 3D Printing microsite, which helps users understand which additive manufacturing technology is best for their application

Author information

Mark Rushton

Mark Rushton

Mark is a Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS.

The post How to Choose the Best Additive Manufacturing Technology for Your Application appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Many analysts predict that 2017 will be the year where the hype around 3D printing fades away and becomes a realistic and commercially viable way of manufacturing more than just prototypes.

The biggest challenge for this is understanding how the many different additive processes work and how to design specifically for it. Simply 3D printing an existing design that has been optimized for a traditional manufacturing method will almost certainly be more expensive. But how do you go about choosing from the many different technologies available?

To help you answer that question and learn more about the current options, we have launched a new mini site focused on additive manufacturing. Check out http://www.solidworks.com/am today. This area will evolve with more webinars, videos, design guides, customer stories and blogs to keep you fully up to date with this very fast-moving technology. There will also be tips and tricks you can use in SOLIDWORKS to allow you to change your manufacturing process without changing CAD systems.

You can expect some very exciting things to help progress designs in this area as well. At SOLIDWORKS World 2017 we announced a partnership with nTopology for lightweight microstructures and generative design capabilities from our sister brand Simulia’s Tosca, which will be integrated into SOLIDWORKS.

SOLIDWORKS will be presenting at the Science in the Age of Experience event taking place May 15-18 in Chicago. There will be a Design Hackathon specifically for Additive Manufacturing where attendees can use SOLIDWORKS to design a product specifically for 3D printing.

Author information

Mark Rushton
Mark Rushton
Mark is a Product Portfolio Manager for SOLIDWORKS.

The post How to Choose the Best Additive Manufacturing Technology for Your Application appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Releasing My Inner Child – SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/releasing-inner-child-solidworks-apps-kids.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/releasing-inner-child-solidworks-apps-kids.html#respond Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:55 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32192
This blog recounts the experience of a SOLIDWORKS employee using SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids.

Author information

Michael Lord

Michael Lord – I work as a Design/ Engineer – Manager at Trakka Pty Limited, an Australian manufacturer of Motorhomes and Special Purpose Vehicle. Sydney SOLIDWORKS User Group Leader. I cover how I use SOLIDWORKS products at http://michaellord.me/
Lover of the great outdoors, hiker, retired caver & climber.

The post Releasing My Inner Child – SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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I’m a child of the Space Age. I was fortunate to grow during a time that marked the birth of what was perhaps the greatest era of exploration, scientific and technological achievements. My childhood coincided with the Apollo missions, with its crowning achievement of seeing men walk on the moon and their safe return to earth.

It was a much different era for a child to grew up in than today. Like many of my generation, I somehow managed to survive my childhood with all limbs still attached. Despite my best effort discovering electricity, being able to own fireworks and having access to a multitude of sharp implements.

Throughout it all I discovered a passion for building things and most likely for their destruction as well, which has lead me into a lifetime of working in design and manufacturing.

Technology has evolved over my lifetime. How we design and manufacture has changed dramatically. Technology influences every aspect of my life. As does its effect on how kids of today will interact and learn. We all know that devices that kids hold in their hands today have infinite more computing power than was accessible to NASA when it was planning to send men to the moon.

SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids fits into today’s era and allows kids to explore the depths of their imagination and create designs and products in the digital age. What is wonderful about kids’ creative minds are they are not yet cluttered by rules and regulations, laws of physics, concepts of colour or any other restrictions that creep into our mindset, as we are forced into adulthood.

SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids is a browser-based program. When complete it will be a full range of apps that will allow the design, creation, display, gaming and manufacture of your mind’s creations! Currently still in Beta, the current apps concentrate on the design and creation of your ideas.

With that in mind I’ve tried to reach back in time, release my inner child and go explore in SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids.

At the heart of SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids is its 3D modeller – Shape It.

Shape It is digital modelling clay! You start with a predefined shape: a box, a cone, a cylinder, a torus, a globe or a ball. These shapes form the bases of your design and start out segmented. The rest is all up to you. By selecting a segment, or group of segments, you can add or subtract material. The segments can be pushed or pulled, stretch and rotated, skewed or deformed. Segments can be further segmented, new shapes added. The only limits are imagination and ability.

I took the child-like approach, diving straight in! Discovery is the best form of learning, right? Those who like to take a more common sense approach might head to the Help section. No boring instructions that require reading!  Instead short concise instructional videos are provided. Nice!

Zooming and rotating around the model will be familiar to anyone with CAD experience. Too many years in SOLIDWORKS, a reflex muscle reaction and I discovered both Apps for Kids and SOLIDWORKS share the spacebar short cut and a common View Selector. With that commonality you might yet be able to pass on some tips to your children!

My childhood was so influenced by the space adventure of the time that most of my school books were covered in doodles of rocket ships. These sketchings were also inspired by the cartoon creations of the day, which meant that all rockets of the time required tail landing fins and a needle nose spire.

With those thoughts planted in my mind I jumped into Shape It to try and recreate my childhood memories.

Pushing and pulling the starting cylinder to create the nosecone was a simple process. As was lengthening the cylinder for the rocket body. Adding material to the nose, then required a little inward pushing from all directions, before a final pull to form the spire.

The tail landing fins proved to be another matter. Not because of Shape It ability. More so my child mind abandoned me and the adult in me came out! I wasn’t overly satisfied with the shape I was creating for the fins. Adults are judgmental and I’m a harsh critic of my own work.

I settled on the design, but in hindsight and a little more experience with Shape It, I would take another approach to how they were created.

Shape It handles multi-bodies. Adding a torus as a new body, I sized to suit and manipulated it into position for the window.  Duplicating the created body provided the additional windows. With that my first model created in Shape It was complete!

Whilst the design may have been complete, it was not ready for presentation. This is where Style It comes in. Style It is the artistic program of SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids. I settled on a classical red, white and blue colour scheme before adding an astronomical themed background. There is a wide range of colours that can be applied along with multitude of stickers to assist with artistic impression. Backgrounds choice, at this stage, is a little limited. I’m sure the range of backgrounds will increase as the product is further developed.

With my Rocket painted and ready for display it was right to share with the SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids online community – Rocket by Michael aged 57

If Shape It is digital modelling clay, then Mech It reminds me of my favourite childhood toy, Meccano®. Or as its one-time competitor product was known in the U.S., Erector Set. I personally consider the Frank Hornsby designed Meccano sets to be the greatest engineering toy ever produced. The sets I had as a child were all purchased secondhand, but I treasured them more than any other toy I was ever given.

Mech It is used to create two-dimensional layout that can have mechanical actions. Mech It can create radius end bars and wheels. Along with slotted straight and circular tracks. Multi -shaped polygons can be created and used as joining plates. Pins can be inserted to create rotation points and parts can have fixed locations. Pistons can be added to create control and motors added to provide drive.

These assemblies can have their driving actions shown in animation.

 

Creating components was a simple matter of point selection and dragging to a required length. As components are created, selection points are added automatically. Components could be resized or moved by grabbing the predefined points. Joining parts together is either a matter of starting a new part on a selected point, or a matter of hovering another component over the selection point of a different part until that attach. Flyout menus allow motors and pins to be added

The ability to build in Mech It is only limited to the creative imaginations and the laws of mechanical actions.

I found it easy to while away the hours creating in either Shape It or Mech It. Whether it be on my computer or sitting at the kitchen table using a touch device. At times I struggled a little without having the availability of precise control and as  well as the inability to tweak things without the use of dimensions. But that is saying more about me with too many years of routine and structure than it does about SOLIDWORKS App for Kids.

I have fond memories of my own childhood activities and creations. Even fonder memories of the hours spent drawing and colouring with my own children. In years to come, I would like to think, that these next generations will look back with similar feelings for the enjoyment and learning that they have gained from using SOLIDWORKS App for Kids.

Author information

Michael Lord
Michael Lord – I work as a Design/ Engineer – Manager at Trakka Pty Limited, an Australian manufacturer of Motorhomes and Special Purpose Vehicle. Sydney SOLIDWORKS User Group Leader. I cover how I use SOLIDWORKS products at http://michaellord.me/ Lover of the great outdoors, hiker, retired caver & climber.

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Schooled in SOLIDWORKS: Mattias Robertsson Reveals Tips to Slash Manufacturing Costs http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/schooled-solidworks-mattias-robertsson-reveals-tips-slash-manufacturing-costs.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/schooled-solidworks-mattias-robertsson-reveals-tips-slash-manufacturing-costs.html#respond Tue, 11 Apr 2017 13:31:50 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32212 schooled-solidworks-simulation-2
Level-up your SOLIDWORKS skills as our inside experts reveal features you never knew existed. In this month’s webinar, find out how you can use SOLIDWORKS Simulation to slash manufacturing costs by testing your product without creating expensive prototypes.    The

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Schooled in SOLIDWORKS: Mattias Robertsson Reveals Tips to Slash Manufacturing Costs appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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schooled-solidworks-simulation-2

Level-up your SOLIDWORKS skills as our inside experts reveal features you never knew existed. In this month’s webinar, find out how you can use SOLIDWORKS Simulation to slash manufacturing costs by testing your product without creating expensive prototypes.   

schooled-solidworks-simulation-1

The best way to learn is to do. The second best? Pluck advice from people who are aces in their field. To help you do just that, SOLIDWORKS is holding a series of webinars hosted by the crème de la crème in our company. It’s your chance to hear from the people who know SOLIDWORKS products like the back of their hand…the next best thing to being in a room with them.

Each month an expert member of our team will share tips on how to get the most from SOLIDWORKS. You will learn to use our product not just as a design tool, but as a means to ease business challenges and ignite rapid progress towards your strategic goals. Sit back and power-up your knowledge of the world’s most advanced 3D design software. Submit your questions at the end.

But hurry, you need to register your interest to benefit from the inside knowledge.

This month we talk to Mattias Robertsson, SOLIDWORKS Technical Manager for Northern Europe.

Here’s a Q&A to introduce his webinar…

Or register your interest now

1. Please introduce yourself…

Hello, my name is Mattias Robertsson. I started my career as a mechanical engineer and joined SOLIDWORKS in 1996 as a reseller. Today I am a Technical Manager in Northern Europe – based in Sweden – and support resellers on all of our products in the Nordic area.

2. What is your webinar about, who is it for and why should I attend?

This webinar is for anybody that has an interest or is curious about SOLIDWORKS’ powerful Simulation tool. The seminar will focus on design optimisation and I’ll be introducing some of the lesser known Simulation tools and how to use them. If you are interested in reducing design time and manufacturing cost, be sure to register.

3. What quick advice would you give to anyone uncertain about using SOLIDWORKS Simulation?

Despite being an incredibly powerful tool, it’s phenomenally easy to use. In fact, it’s like switching from doing sums by hand to using a calculator. Why would anyone go back?

4. What’s your favourite feature of SOLIDWORKS Simulation?

ISO section view – no doubt about it.

5. What makes ISO section view so good?

SOLIDWORKS Simulation is all about reducing manufacturing costs by allowing users to test how a product will behave in the real world. You can test strength, heat resistance, load-bearing potential and much more. ISO section view provides a clear understanding of where energy is absorbed in the material, meaning there’s no need to add to production costs by building prototypes.

6. How do you think customers have benefitted from using SOLIDWORKS Simulation?

Customers can make design decisions based on the results they find in SOLIDWORKS Simulation. Customers don’t need to build expensive prototypes thanks to the testing they can do directly in their 3D model, and then they can simply make the design tweaks needed. Ultimately, it saves them time and money.

7. When does your webinar take place?

8:30 AM-9:00 AM GMT on Wednesday, April 26th. Can’t make it? No biggie! Register your interest anyway and you’ll be notified when the video of the webinar is available to stream.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Schooled in SOLIDWORKS: Mattias Robertsson Reveals Tips to Slash Manufacturing Costs appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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PicoBrew’s Latest Kickstarter Project Brings Homebrewing to Everyone http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/picobrews-latest-kickstarter-project-brings-homebrewing-everyone.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/picobrews-latest-kickstarter-project-brings-homebrewing-everyone.html#respond Mon, 10 Apr 2017 12:26:23 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32203
Love the idea of homebrewing, but are intimidated by the process? The new Pico Model C was made for you. Designed in SOLIDWORKS, learn how the Pico Model C makes it easier than ever anyone to homebrew delicious beer.

Author information

Mike Fearon

Mike Fearon

Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post PicoBrew’s Latest Kickstarter Project Brings Homebrewing to Everyone appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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PicoBrew was founded in Seattle in 2010 by brothers Bill and Jim Mitchell, a former Microsoft executive and food scientist, along with engineer Avi Geiger. Combining their food science and technology expertise with their passion for homebrewing, they set out to improve the craft beer brewing process for small producers and homebrewers.

The goal was to create a small-scale brewing machine that would improve on the precision, repeatability and overall quality of the home-brewing experience. The first result was the PicoBrew Zymatic, which has since been awarded three patents, with more than a dozen others pending. The team didn’t stop there, however. They are focused on democratizing the home-brewing process and making it as simple as possible for anyone, even those with zero experience, to brew high-quality beer.

PicoBrew’s latest project, the Pico Model C, makes craft brewing easier, more affordable and more fun than ever. The model C is a smart craft beer brewing appliance that allows you to brew 5L kegs. You can check out the Kickstarter by clicking here. The Pico C reached its funding goal in a mere seven hours. This is thanks to PicoBrew’s reputation for innovation and high-quality, reliable machines. During the campaign’s lifespan, PicoBrew raised 1.9M on Kickstarter. Clearly beer and homebrew lovers are believers. Even if you missed the Kickstarter, you can still pre-order the Pico C with an ETA of November 2017 – just in time for the holidays. Make delicious beer at home and avoid the holiday rush…you can’t lose!

When PicoBrew was looking to transform the home-brewing process, it turned to SOLIDWORKS to design its revolutionary countertop device. “We’re always innovating at Picobrew and trying to deliver that in the shortest time possible,” Avi said. “SOLIDWORKS helps us build complex machines where every part needs to fit and function, and that’s something worth raising a glass of fresh craft beer to.”

As for the beer itself, it is brewed using PicoPaks. Each PicoPak contains all the grains and hops needed to brew a delicious batch of fresh craft beer. The beers are created from award-winning recipes from their brewery partners all over the globe allowing you to brew their beer in your home! When I’m on vacation, I love to try new beers but sadly not all of them are available in my area. PicoBrew makes this problem a thing of the past and its brewing partners include famous names such as Abita Brewing, 21st Amendment, and Rogue, just to name a few. They also offer a selection of PicoPaks from their own line of killer recipes, created by Master Brewer Annie Johnson. Annie was the first woman to be honored as the American Homebrewer Association’s prestigious Homebrewer of the Year award.

If you love the idea of home brewing, but feel intimidated by the home-brewing process, the Pico Model C is the choice for you. They make brewing beer at home practically foolproof. Better yet, the company makes brewing your own fresh craft beer even more affordable, simple and fun. SOLIDWORKS users create truly amazing products. We’ve seen everything from space travel to ocean cleanup technology. I must say, giving me the tools to successfully brew delicious craft beer has to be up there with landing a man on the moon.

Support the Kickstarter today! Reserve your machine and when your Pico C is ready, you’ll be turning around 5L kegs in a matter of weeks and the results will be delicious. Click here to check out the Pico C!

 

Author information

Mike Fearon
Mike Fearon
Senior Manager Brand Offer Marketing, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS. Video game world champion and whisky advocate. I like turtles.

The post PicoBrew’s Latest Kickstarter Project Brings Homebrewing to Everyone appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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SOLIDWORKS MBD: Complying with ASME Y14.5-2009 Continuous Feature Tolerances http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/solidworks-mbd-complying-asme-y14-5-2009-continuous-feature-tolerances.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/solidworks-mbd-complying-asme-y14-5-2009-continuous-feature-tolerances.html#respond Thu, 06 Apr 2017 12:00:54 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32110
This blog explains how SOLIDWORKS MBD complies with continuous feature requirements for ASME Y14.5-2009 standards.

Author information

Chris Pagliarini

Chris Pagliarini

Chris is a Roles Portfolio Management Intern currently studying at Wentworth Institute of Technology

The post SOLIDWORKS MBD: Complying with ASME Y14.5-2009 Continuous Feature Tolerances appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Recently, some users have been asking about whether SOLIDWORKS MBD complies with the continuous feature requirements for ASME Y14.5-2009 standards. The standards specify two use cases shown in the figures below. One case involves coaxial same-sized holes, and the other involves multiple co-planar faces divided by grooves.

Figure 1: ASME Continuous feature standards

It is of great importance for SOLIDWORKS MBD to comply with these standards. Although these features (holes or planes) are disconnected, they are to be manufactured and inspected together continuously. Hence, they are called continuous features. I created some test models of my own to share with you how SOLIDWORKS MBD is complying with the latest industry standards.

Figure 2: Test model for continuous features, internal cylinders

Figure 3: Test model for continuous features, internal cylinders

Figure 4: Test model for continuous features, External Width

Figure 5: Test model for continuous features, External Width

I created these models to show the compliance of SOLIDWORKS MBD to the ASME continuous feature standards. Notice how MBD has the ability to highlight both features of the part when the single DimXpert annotation is selected. This graphical representation of the continuous feature helps remove any misconception during manufacturing. To achieve these results users can create a compound feature, which I demonstrate in some short videos below. Also to aid in the compliance with ASME standards users can easily add symbols to DimXpert annotations like the continuous feature symbol (CF) seen above. Symbols can be added from within the DimXpert manager under the dimension text category. Compound features and symbols are just another great way that SOLIDWORKS MBD is able to identically recreate and comply with the leading-industry standards.

Figure 6: Add symbol icon (left), SOLIDWORKS Symbol library (right)

 

Author information

Chris Pagliarini
Chris Pagliarini
Chris is a Roles Portfolio Management Intern currently studying at Wentworth Institute of Technology

The post SOLIDWORKS MBD: Complying with ASME Y14.5-2009 Continuous Feature Tolerances appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Kinder Design Creates Innovative Products Faster with SOLIDWORKS Premium http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/kinder-design-creates-innovative-products-faster-solidworks-premium.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/kinder-design-creates-innovative-products-faster-solidworks-premium.html#respond Wed, 05 Apr 2017 12:00:40 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32178
Find out how Kinder Design developed the Lift Top adjustable table and cut its development time in half by switching from 2D to SOLIDWORKS solutions.

Author information

Josie Morales

Josie Morales

Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post Kinder Design Creates Innovative Products Faster with SOLIDWORKS Premium appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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At SOLIDWORKS, we love hearing stories of how our users create innovative products.  In today’s customer story highlight, we introduce Kinder Design Inc., a leading design and engineering services consulting firm based near Toronto, Canada. Not only does Kinder Design produce innovative designs for its customers, but they also used SOLIDWORKS solutions to create its own product, the Lift Top.  Owner and Mechanical Designer Tim Chung, who founded Kinder Design after spending over 10 years working as a mechanical engineer, previously relied on 2D design packages, like AutoCAD® and CADKEY®.  When starting his own business, he quickly realized that in order to be successful and continually grow his company, switching to a 3D design package would be critical to saving time and automating design processes.  It did not take long for Chung and Kinder Design to standardize on SOLIDWORKS Premium.

Chung explains, “With SOLIDWORKS® 3D design software, I am able to complete my work quickly and efficiently. SOLIDWORKS is also the most commonly used 3D package in the areas and industries in which I consult, so the decision to use SOLIDWORKS was easy to make.”

Not only does Kinder Design use SOLIDWORKS to provide efficient, cost-effective solutions for its clients, but they also develop its own innovative products, such as the Lift Top adjustable desktop table, with the help of SOLIDWORKS.  This Lift Top adjustable table allows users to work comfortably both sitting and standing with minimal effort switching back and forth.

During the development of the Lift Top, Chung’s goal was to make this table as portable and lightweight as possible to make it easy for on-the-go.  To make the product as light as possible while maintaining strength, Chung took advantage of SOLIDWORKS Simulation tools, which are included in SOLIDWORKS Premium to optimize the design. He was able to cut the number of prototypes by 75 percent.

To find out more about the Kinder Design and how it cut its development time in half with SOLIDWORKS Premium, Click Here.

 

Author information

Josie Morales
Josie Morales
Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post Kinder Design Creates Innovative Products Faster with SOLIDWORKS Premium appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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When to use FEA vs. CFD for Thermal Analysis http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/use-fea-vs-cfd-thermal-analysis.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/04/use-fea-vs-cfd-thermal-analysis.html#respond Mon, 03 Apr 2017 14:02:40 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32152
This blog explains which analysis tool to use when conducting thermal analysis.

Author information

Mai Doan

Mai Doan

Mai is a Territory Technical Manager for SOLIDWORKS

The post When to use FEA vs. CFD for Thermal Analysis appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Did you know that SOLIDWORKS Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis for heat transfer is now as easy to perform as Finite Element Analysis (FEA)?

It’s true.
In the past if an engineer didn’t have a PhD and expensive specialized software, their choice for heat transfer analysis was limited to FEA. That’s unfortunate because for most thermal simulation applications, FEA is not the best tool for the job. SOLIDWORKS Flow Simulation is fully embedded inside SOLIDWORKS, making it easy to use and easy to set up. Since the power of CFD is now seamlessly integrated into the platform that you use every day, you can readily choose the simulation tool that best fits your needs.

Now you know that FEA and CFD are equally easy to use, do you know when to use one versus the other? We will make that question easy to answer too. The tool to use depends on the heat transfer mechanisms that are taking place in the components that you are designing: conduction, convection, radiation or most of the time, a combination of all three. In addition, the level of accuracy you are willing to accept will also influence your decision.

The table below summarizes the tool to use depending on the type of heat transfer mechanisms you are analyzing:

To find out more about when to use FEA vs. CFD, watch this short video:

Click on the banner below to get more information about SOLIDWORKS Simulation packages or contact your Value Added Reseller.

Author information

Mai Doan
Mai Doan
Mai is a Territory Technical Manager for SOLIDWORKS

The post When to use FEA vs. CFD for Thermal Analysis appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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March Madness and the Importance of Data Management Fundamentals http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/march-madness-importance-data-management-fundamentals.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/march-madness-importance-data-management-fundamentals.html#respond Thu, 30 Mar 2017 12:00:04 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32140
This blog explains the primary benefits of having a PDM system in place.

Author information

Steve Fick

Steve Fick

Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS

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March Madness is upon us. And, like any good Indiana boy born with a basketball in hand, I like to keep an eye on the tournament. It’s fun to hear about the amazing plays and the Cinderella stories, but more often than not, team success is grounded in the fundamentals of the game.

In many ways, managing your engineering data is the same. There’s huge excitement around integrating engineering with other business systems, accessing engineering data through our mobile devices, and enabling lots of powerful automation. Often times, however, initial success is found in the data management fundamentals.

File Management

Let’s start with core file management. One of the things that you quickly find out when you start using an associative CAD system is that renaming and moving your files can cause headaches. We all remember the first time we tried to rename a file to its assigned part number, move it to a released directory on the network, and then re-open the assembly. There’s a sense of panic that overtakes you when you see this image and are left trying to remember what you renamed the file to and where you put it.

With SOLIDWORKS PDM, this challenge disappears. Users are free to rename files as they please and move them to convenient locations as needed, all the while having SOLIDWORKS PDM manage all the file references effortlessly. Once done, you can open your assembly or drawing without fear of error or warning.

Revision Management

Another area where a lot of spent effort occurs is in trying the manage the revisions of an engineering design. I’ve seen many ways of attempting this. Everything from just not doing it all, to the opposite extreme of saving new part files with a revision appended to it, along with a new assembly, and a new drawing.

With SOLIDWORKS PDM, you’re able to track both versions AND revisions. By checking in your design, PDM automatically captures the changes that have been made, making them available at any time. When I’m ready to release a design, a revision letter can be applied, giving me a complete record of the design. In addition, PDM understands the ‘as built’ state of the design. Meaning, if I pull up an old revision, it references the revisions of the parts and assemblies at that point in time.

Rights Management

Often times, access to the engineering data at the right time in the design process, is as choreographed as a buzzer beating inbound play. Files are often located on one network drive while the design is in process, and then carefully moved to the ‘release’ folder when the design is finished. Managing all the referenced files and making sure they end up where they need be takes a lot of work.

With SOLIDWORKS PDM, workflows allow us to have powerful control over file access. By simply changing the workflow state of the file, I can affect not only the visibility of the file, but also the read / write access to the file as well. No more moving files around to the ‘released’ drive and trying to make sure those that are under change aren’t available to manufacturing.

In basketball, the fundamentals are often an uncelebrated part of the game. However, getting the fundamentals right allows a player in a high-stakes situation to focus on the execution and improvisation that’s often required in the game. Design is very much the same. If your data management fundamentals are solid, you can turn your attention to where it counts: executing efficiently on your design and getting to market quickly.

For more information on SOLIDWORKS PDM, please visit the product page.

Good luck on those brackets this year!

Author information

Steve Fick
Steve Fick
Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS

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Show Off Your Skills with Technical Certificates http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/show-off-skills-technical-certificates.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/show-off-skills-technical-certificates.html#respond Wed, 29 Mar 2017 13:23:16 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32092
There are many reasons for wanting to get certified, but one of the most common reasons is to show a potential employer that you hold a certain level of knowledge of SOLIDWORKS. The most popular certification exams are SOLIDWORKS CSWA,

Author information

Tony Glockler

Tony Glockler is the co-founder of SolidProfessor, an online learning company that specializes in software applications used in engineering and design. Beginning his education at UCLA with a BS in Mechanical Engineering, Tony experienced first-hand the limited resources available to students to become proficient, employable CAD users. His passion is combining the best of instructional design and technology to help engineers and designers become more effective. Through SolidProfessor, Tony has helped design teams keep up with their rapidly evolving software tools with an ongoing guided learning experience. To learn more, visit www.SolidProfessor.com

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There are many reasons for wanting to get certified, but one of the most common reasons is to show a potential employer that you hold a certain level of knowledge of SOLIDWORKS. The most popular certification exams are SOLIDWORKS CSWA, CSWP, and CSWE, which showcase increasing levels of proficiency with the software as well as design principles and best practices. New certification programs, like SolidProfessor’s Technical Certificates, demonstrate specific skills and competencies in dozens of in-demand SOLIDWORKS categories, such as sheet metal, advanced part design, surfacing, and more.

Certification in the Workplace

Companies that offer proactive training programs sometimes consider certification part of internal training or professional development initiatives. Some even tie certification to bonuses, pay raises, or even promotions. Kavlico, a brand of Custom Sensors & Technologies, is one such company that successfully raised the bar across its entire team through certification. According to Mike Spicer, CAD Administrator at Kavlico, the company “implemented a certification program where managers have begun to require that the drafting and design staff have SOLIDWORKS certifications, proving their proficiencies.”

To prepare their team for those exams, Spicer provided them with an online certification prep course and achieved remarkable success. “SolidProfessor played an important role in preparing our guys for those certification exams.”

Employees understand that in order to progress in their careers, they need to set themselves apart by demonstrating consistent growth. For employers, encouraging (or requiring) their team to get certified means they can feel confident that their team members are using best practices. By standardizing design skills across your team, employers can increase productivity and stay on the cutting edge of new features and capabilities.

Certification in Schools

For students, obtaining the CSWA certification is a great way to find a job right out of school. At Atlantic Technical College, for example, teacher Kevin Finan encourages his students to get industry certified. “The CSWA is not an easy certification. You have to know what you’re doing. The fact that they passed proves to other students that SolidProfessor is preparing them for the certification exam.” Some students even go after their CSWP while in school to boost their resume. “The students that passed the CSWA are already talking about passing at the professional level (CSWP), and that’s why we introduced SolidProfessor into the class. The next step is getting them to continue to work independently and reach the professional level.”

In both high school career and technical education (CTE) programs and also college engineering courses, instructors work to get their students ready for careers. It is essential to provide students with the resources to help them get hired out of school by arming them with practical knowledge and also the proof of their competency through certifications.
Each CSWA, CSWP, and CSWE exam is different, making it impossible to know which models you’ll receive and what types of modifications you’ll be asked to make. The most important thing is to become familiar with the style of questions asked, their levels of complexity, and how to save time along the way.

A Path to Certification

For SOLIDWORKS users who want to demonstrate specific skills within the software, SolidProfessor recently launched its Technical Certificates program. Technical Certificates, free for SolidProfessor members, are earned by taking a SolidProfessor course and earning an 80 percent or higher on the review test for that course. Each SolidProfessor Technical Certificate earned can be easily shared on LinkedIn profiles and printed for display. Now, SolidProfessor Technical Certifications can help you achieve your CSWA or CSWP by providing a path to these milestones. The CSWA and CSWP exams are robust, covering a lot of skills and requiring both accuracy and speed. SolidProfessor and SOLIDWORKS have partnered to offer a pathway to industry certification through achieving “stepping stones” to specific Technical Certificates.

SolidProfessor’s CSWA Pathway

View the below courses and earn an 80 percent or higher on the SolidProfessor assessment to earn and share these Technical Certificates. Use this pathway to prepare yourself for the CSWA and earn a free CSWA exam code:
· Introduction to SOLIDWORKS
· SOLIDWORKS Drawings
· CSWA Prep Course

SolidProfessor’s CSWP Pathway

View the below courses and earn an 80 percent or higher on the SolidProfessor assessment to earn and share these Technical Certificates. Use this pathway to prepare yourself for the CSWP and earn a free CSWP exam code:
· SOLIDWORKS Essentials for Parts and Assemblies
· SOLIDWORKS Advanced Parts
· SOLIDWORKS Advanced Assemblies
· CSWP Prep Course

In addition to the certification pathways, SolidProfessor’s Technical Certificates can demonstrate specific skills like SimulationXpress, Visualize, Model-Based Definition, Routing, Plastics, Composer, and more.

Earning certification can help engineers get a job or move up in their current job by demonstrating key industry skills and competencies. SOLIDWORKS is developing more capabilities than ever. Gaining new skills and showcasing your achievements through certification will help engineers and designers stand out to employers, get a promotion, or earn a raise.

Certification demonstrates both your dedication to improving your skills and also your technical knowledge. Obtaining a certification proves that you not only have comprehensive SOLIDWORKS knowledge, but that you also have invested in your career and yourself.

Author information

Tony Glockler
Tony Glockler is the co-founder of SolidProfessor, an online learning company that specializes in software applications used in engineering and design. Beginning his education at UCLA with a BS in Mechanical Engineering, Tony experienced first-hand the limited resources available to students to become proficient, employable CAD users. His passion is combining the best of instructional design and technology to help engineers and designers become more effective. Through SolidProfessor, Tony has helped design teams keep up with their rapidly evolving software tools with an ongoing guided learning experience. To learn more, visit www.SolidProfessor.com

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Bring Your Kids to Get Creative with SOLIDWORKS at Maker Faire UK http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/bring-kids-get-creative-solidworks-maker-faire-uk.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/bring-kids-get-creative-solidworks-maker-faire-uk.html#respond Tue, 28 Mar 2017 11:00:57 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32131
Little minds love to create, little fingers love to make. That’s why we’re so proud of SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids. It’s a suite of pick-up-and-play design applications that gets creative kids engaged with visualising, designing and making. Gather up your

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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Little minds love to create, little fingers love to make. That’s why we’re so proud of SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids. It’s a suite of pick-up-and-play design applications that gets creative kids engaged with visualising, designing and making. Gather up your little ones and come and see SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids in action at Maker Faire UK – the greatest show and tell on the planet – on 1st – 2nd April.

Rising cakes, rising craft

British craft is on the rise. An increase in homemade manufacturing, sewing, craft and baking reflect the boom in DIY culture sweeping the nation. Call it the Bake-Off effect if you like. But as a country, we are all agog for picking up the tools and doing it ourselves. And there’s a huge market for it too.

What is Maker Faire UK?

Having originally started in San Mateo, CA, the global event celebrated its’ tenth annual show in 2015 with some 1,200 makers and 145,000 attendees. With large-scale events happening globally from Tokyo to Detroit (and now the UK!), it’s easy to see that maker communities are on the up!

Maker Faire UK showcases the hunger for the homemade; a two-day family-friendly exhibition demonstrating the best in global ingenuity and invention. It’s a journey through the creations of over 300 passionate and skilled hackers, crafters, makers and coders. Traditional craft. Sewing. Software. Modelling. They’ve made it, Maker Faire is your chance to get up close and personal with it.

With makers from model creationists to 3D printing enthusiasts, it’s a perfect opportunity for parents and kids alike to get stuck into projects we can be doing in our very own homes. So if your little ones are budding scientists or enthusiastic engineers – Maker Faire could be the very thing to pull them away from their games consoles and social media accounts.

And guess what? SOLIDWORKS is there too. Because it’s not just about exhibiting invention but enabling it too. Just ask the kids who recently put our suite of apps to the test.

>> Little fingers test SOLIDWORKS Apps For Kids


If kids can dream it, they can build it

Apps For Kids is a suite of apps designed for enquiring minds and young inventors. Think of it as a mini SOLIDWORKS – an engaging designer and maker that’s super-easy (and oodles of fun) to use. Best of all it gives kids the freedom to play with ideas and bring their creations to life through 3D CAD modelling. Where better to showcase Apps For Kids than an event that celebrates the values of imagination, ingenuity and creation? Exactly.


Come and see for yourself!

Near Newcastle on the 1st or 2nd April? Then get down to Life Science Centre and discover the greatest show and tell on the planet. Maker Faire captures the imagination of the next generation and inspires investment in engineering via a world of tactile discovery. We’ll see you there, right?

Reserve tickets here.

Or if you – or a young person you know – would like to try Apps For Kids, get special access to the beta trial here.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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22-Minute Webinar: Don’t Waste Time Managing Data http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/22-minute-webinar-dont-waste-time-managing-data.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/22-minute-webinar-dont-waste-time-managing-data.html#respond Thu, 23 Mar 2017 12:30:41 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32088
Stop spending time organizing files and start doing the work you enjoy. Learn how in this 22-minute webinar.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post 22-Minute Webinar: Don’t Waste Time Managing Data appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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You create innovative product designs…it’s just what you do day in and day out. If you are working without a product data management (PDM) system in place, however, you might be spending too much of your time either searching for design files or correcting mistakes due to incorrect, out-of-date files.

“Oh you know what I’m looking forward to today? Trying to find version 7 of this project I’ve been working on for months,” said no one ever. No one got into a creative profession excited to organize data, so stop letting data management stifle your creativity.

Why not attend the 22-minute webinar on Tuesday, March 28 to learn how a simple-to-use and easy-to-implement PDM tool, such as SOLIDWORKS PDM, can give you back that time you’ve been wasting so you can focus on designing that next great product.

In just 22-minutes, learn how SOLIDWORKS PDM can help you:

  • Find the right files quickly with comprehensive search
  • Keep track of & share your design concepts & revisions without Pack and Go
  • Freely rename and move files without breaking your designs
  • Easily maintain as-built in addition to latest model arrangements

Two sessions are available. Click here to register for the 11:00am or 2:00pm ET presentation. Leave file management to the squares. You’ve got cooler stuff to do!

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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Explore How SOLIDWORKS Solutions Saved CoaX Helicopters Years in Development Time http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/explore-solidworks-solutions-saved-coax-helicopters-years-development-time.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/explore-solidworks-solutions-saved-coax-helicopters-years-development-time.html#respond Wed, 22 Mar 2017 18:30:38 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32081
Find out how CoaX Helicopters is revolutionizing coaxial rotor helicopter technology and commercializing safer, faster, and more cost effective helicopters.

Author information

Josie Morales

Josie Morales

Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post Explore How SOLIDWORKS Solutions Saved CoaX Helicopters Years in Development Time appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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How badly do you want to ride that helicopter right now?  To me, it looks like one of those old school video games where you’re saving the world, extinguishing one fire at a time. This is definitely not a video game. CoaX Helicopters is revolutionizing coaxial rotor helicopter technology and commercializing these safer, faster, and more cost effective helicopters.  Let’s take a deeper dive into their story.

CoaX Helicopters Ltd. is an Australian company that is commercializing the use of coaxial rotor helicopter technology for use in manned and unmanned applications.  Previously, Coaxial rotor helicopters were only used by the military, but now with CoaX expanding the technology into commercial industry the uses can range from fire safety to drone delivery.  CoaX Helicopters acquired the rights to the Gyrodyne technology and quickly started creating prototypes for commercial use, revolutionizing the helicopter industry by providing safer, more economical, and more powerful machines capable of carrying heavier loads.

When acquiring new companies or technologies, full implementation into your existing business model is always a challenge. CoaX Helicopters faced these same challenges when they acquired the new technology from Gyrodyne which included the original 2D drawings.  They knew they needed to find a design platform to optimize the existing technology for commercial use and transform these 2D designs into a 3D platform.  CoaX Helicopters chose to standardize on SOLIDWORKS Premium because it’s easy to use, supports fast, frequent design changes, and provides integrated simulation capabilities. They also chose SOLIDWORKS Composer technical communication software to easily demonstrate the technology to prospective customers and investors, as well as prepare its manned and unmanned helicopter designs for manufacturing and assembly.

According to Managing Director Peter Batten, “SOLIDWORKS saved our team of five engineers years in development time. Frankly, we couldn’t do what we’re doing with the body, and utilize the number of available parts this quickly, without SOLIDWORKS.”

To find out more about CoaX Helicopters and how they capitalized on this technology to create safer and faster helicopters, Click Here!

Author information

Josie Morales
Josie Morales
Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post Explore How SOLIDWORKS Solutions Saved CoaX Helicopters Years in Development Time appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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3D PDF Sample: National Institute of standards and Technology (NIST) Test Assembly http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/3d-pdf-sample-national-institute-standards-technology-nist-test-assembly.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/3d-pdf-sample-national-institute-standards-technology-nist-test-assembly.html#respond Tue, 21 Mar 2017 13:00:46 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32066
This blog explains the recently conducted National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 2017 MBE PMI validation and conformance test for CAD vendors.

Author information

Chris Pagliarini

Chris Pagliarini

Chris is a Roles Portfolio Management Intern currently studying at Wentworth Institute of Technology

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The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recently conducted their 2017 MBE PMI validation and conformance test for CAD vendors. They previously ran the test in 2012 and 2015. NIST created a “test system to measure the conformance of computer aided design software to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) standards for product manufacturing information (PMI), specifically geometric dimensioning and tolerancing” [1]. The test system includes a set of 11 models specifically designed to test the limits of Model-based definition software.

The test cases are designed to determine whether or not the CAD software correctly implements the PMI concepts of ASME Y 14.5-1994 and ASME Y 14.41-2003 [1]. “The most current versions of ASME Y14.5 (2009) and Y14.41 (2012) are not included as they have not yet been widely implemented in CAD software” [1]. Along with validating the implementation of standards, NIST’s key objective was to verify the semantic representation of PMI for downstream manufacturing purposes.

I personally was fortunate enough to manage and work very closely with the upcoming validation and conformance testing of SOLIDWORKS MBD 2017. I was in charge of upgrading the models and their product manufacturing information from SOLIDWORKS 2012 to SOLIDWORKS 2017. With all this being said, while we await the results I decided to assembly a few of the NIST test parts and create some 3D PDF’s using SOLIDWORKS MBD. Out of the 11 NIST test models 4 of the parts can be assembled together. The assembly consists of NIST test case models 7, 8, 9, and 10. The assembly can be seen below.

 

Figure 1: NIST Test case assembly

 

One of my goals in assembling and publishing a PDF with the NIST assembly was to ultimately learn about 3D PDF’s but also test its capabilities while doing so. To begin I created an assembly that contained fasteners, exploded views, multiple display states, and multiple configurations using the NIST parts.

After organizing my PMI and creating all the necessary 3D views it was time to build my custom PDF template. I created a template with the design in mind that I wanted to print my PDF with multiple sheets for clear and easy viewing. I created a single assembly PDF template that contained a primary viewport on one page and independent viewports on the following pages to display the multiple configurations of the assembly.


With this template I would be able to easily print the published PDF and view the multiple configurations side by side. I even created a PDF template for each individual part of the assembly. One template was built for a multiple configuration part and the other was a simple part template.

Once I had my templates all set and ready to go all that was left was to publish a 3D PDF of the NIST assembly using SOLIDWORKS MBD. It’s important to note the custom property placeholders and PDF text areas throughout my templates. With the use of these I can easily input information directly from my model into the PDF. I can even input my B.O.M tables. When publishing users are given the option to attach files directly to the PDF so I attached each individual part 3D PDF to the assembly 3D PDF. All the needed information was easily transferred in a matter of a few clicks from SOLIDWORKS into a single clean and easy to read PDF file. Once published, I filled in my notes directly within Adobe and the PDF was all set. I would say 3D PDF’s passed the test in my book!

Download the full interactive 3D PDF here.

Figure 6: Published 3D PDF of NIST assembly

 

Figure 7: Individual parts directly attached to assembly

Figure 8: Assembly Configuration A

Figure 9: Assembly Configuration B

Figure 10: Configuration comparison for NIST_07

Figure 11: Individual part 3D PDF

Reference:
[1]lipman, Lubell, Hedberg, Feeney, Frechette,2017, “MBE PMI Validation and Conformance Testing Project.” From https://www.nist.gov/el/systems-integration-division-73400/mbe-pmi-validation-and-conformance-testing

Author information

Chris Pagliarini
Chris Pagliarini
Chris is a Roles Portfolio Management Intern currently studying at Wentworth Institute of Technology

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Hardware Startup Myomo Partners with SOLIDWORKS for Success http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/hardware-startup-myomo-partners-solidworks-success.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/hardware-startup-myomo-partners-solidworks-success.html#respond Thu, 16 Mar 2017 12:00:41 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32044
This blog discusses the mutually beneficial partnership between startup Myomo and SOLIDWORKS.

Author information

Kurt Anliker

Kurt Anliker

Kurt is the Director of Product Introduction at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

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It’s hard to believe the relationship between SOLIDWORKS and Myomo began just one year ago…and what a busy year it has been.  OK, yes, the partnership between us has been in place for many years now and on many fronts. From Myomo’s deep roots in education and research at MIT, its commitment to mentoring programs like First Robotics teams at local high schools, to its commercial use of SOLIDWORKS products in the design process, Myomo has had numerous connections to the SOLIDWORKS community.
The next step in the relationship began March 2nd, 2016.

Andrew Harlan was invited to present at the SOLIDWORKS Q1 Company Meeting in Waltham and share the Myomo story. His presentation and product demonstration on the Myomo Orthosis device was both moving and compelling to the entire audience. Stories like these are an inspiration, the “emotional paycheck” that drives many SOLIDWORKS employees.

The SOLIDWORKS 2017 Launch was my first as Director of Product Introduction. For the 2017 Launch, our goal was to showcase a customer design that highlights ALL of the new functionality and workflows, while telling their story from design through manufacturing. The Myomo Orthosis was a perfect fit and gave the opportunity to showcase every product in the SOLIDWORKS Portfolio.

Working with Andrew to understand the design, engineering, manufacturing and use of the model, the Product Introduction Team had no problem removing proprietary details and data to protect Myomo’s IP and creating a version of the design that highlights the new SOLIDWORKS functionality. The team was also able to create a number of items to share with Myomo that helped its design and marketing teams.

What happened next is the magic that is SOLIDWORKS Product Introduction. SOLIDWORKS customers appreciate seeing new functionality shown in real-world production models and workflows. By digging through the Myomo model in detail, we can find places to showcase the new functionality and how it would be applied. Taking all these examples, the team produces videos, images, and product demonstrations to support the launch of SOLIDWORKS 2017. This year we took things a step further. Not only did we partner with Myomo to use its dataset for launch, we also used their story both in a case study and live at the SOLIDWORKS 2017 Launch Event.

To date, over 2,000 application engineers in the SOLIDWORKS Reseller Channel have learned about 2017 functionality through the Myomo dataset. Even better, over 50,000 SOLIDWORKS users around the world have seen SOLIDWORKS 2017 presented with the Myomo dataset and have been inspired by its story.

If you find yourself inspired by the Myomo story, learn more about how you can be involved.
If you’re inspired to create your own story, the SOLIDWORKS for Entrepreneurs Program is a proven way to get started.

If you simply want to share your story like Myomo, we would love to hear from you.

Author information

Kurt Anliker
Kurt Anliker
Kurt is the Director of Product Introduction at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

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Felcana: The New Product that Revolutionises Pet Care http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/felcana-new-product-revolutionises-pet-care.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/felcana-new-product-revolutionises-pet-care.html#respond Tue, 14 Mar 2017 13:33:07 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31265
You’ve heard of activity trackers for humans. Now there’s one for animals too. It stands to revolutionise what we know about our furry friends’ habits, as well as the speed at which vets can diagnose our pets. Until they develop

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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You’ve heard of activity trackers for humans. Now there’s one for animals too. It stands to revolutionise what we know about our furry friends’ habits, as well as the speed at which vets can diagnose our pets.

Until they develop opposable thumbs, it’s unlikely you’ll be having a WhatsApp powwow with your bow wow. The next best thing is Felcana – a series of connected devices that capture the comings and goings of moggies and doggies.

Think of it as a lifestyle tracker for your furry friend. You can monitor how often your pet sleeps, where they are in the house, how often they eat, how much activity they get and an awful lot more. All with the aim of better understanding your pet’s behaviour and habits.

Felcana can even detect whether your pet may be feeling anxious or unwell. Or, whether they are eating or drinking less than they should be. Or, if they are experiencing symptoms that suggest a trip to the vets is in order.

Invented by vets, Felcana is also an invaluable tool to help animal experts diagnose unwell cats and dogs and make sure they get the treatment they need faster. By gathering and interpreting data on your creature’s behaviour, Felcana connects owners, pets and vets like never before.

“As vets we can struggle to get the lowdown from our canine and feline friends. Even the most devoted owner can’t answer every single question we might have. Felcana sheds light on clinical blind spots, providing hard data for vets and peace of mind for owners. We don’t have to ask how much water a dog is drinking, we know. It means quicker, more certain treatment.” – Dr James Andrews, Vet and inventor of Felcana


How does it work?

Felcana is essentially a series of connected devices.

The first is a waterproof tracker that attaches to the collars of cats and dogs. This monitors activity and connects with beacons: small signal boxes that are spread around the owner’s home to track pet movements. Data is sent to a hub – also the tracker charging point – which connects to a mobile app that owners can access through their smartphone or tablet.

From the app, owners get a snapshot of their dog’s behaviour, habits, health, happiness and more. Felcana can even issue push alerts to user devices if your pet begins behaving unusually or displays early signs of illness.

How did SOLIDWORKS help?

As a start-up, the team behind Felcana were faced with the unenviable task of creating an innovative product on a shoestring budget. That’s where the SOLIDWORKS Entrepreneur Program came in, which granted Felcana a twelve-month license as well as 3D CAD training and marketing assistance.

“Some of the most creative products are coming from the early stage start-up community. Their inventiveness and ambition is great, but they often lack the capital to invest in industry leading software like SOLIDWORKS. The SOLIDWORKS team recognised in Felcana the potential to build a market-leading product in the pet sector and granted them an Entrepreneur license to see this project grow and develop.” Greg Smith, Director, Startup Advocacy & Community Applications, SOLIDWORKS

With SOLIDWORKS on their team, Felcana’s designers got to work on refining their product through intensive 3D modelling, exploring different options in terms of size, design and appearance. The result is a series of devices that are smart, unobtrusive, lightweight and tough enough to take whatever the most rambunctious cats and dogs can throw at them.

“Access to SOLIDWORKS through their Entrepreneur Program has been an invaluable element in designing Felcana. Allowing us to rapidly design, shape and test each component, miniaturising and integrating the form factor seamlessly with our proprietary technology. Collaboration with SOLIDWORKS through their Entrepreneur Program has ensured the team here at Felcana could move through to modelling stages at an accelerated pace with confidence.” Tom Blower, Head of Product, Felcana

 

What’s next for Felcana?
Having come second place in a recent Pitch@Palace contest, Felcana has just completed raising funds on Kickstarter raising over £26,000 with 250 backers from over 30 countries. A fantastic achievement! The team expect to beta test in early 2017 and are anticipating a 2017 retail launch.

You might also be interested in:
>> SOLIDWORKS on song for premium hi-fi manufacturer
>> 10 ways to reduce product development costs

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Felcana: The New Product that Revolutionises Pet Care appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Stump the Chump: Can a Sketch Profile Change as a Function of the Length of the Sweep Curve? http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/stump-chump-can-sketch-profile-change-function-length-sweep-curve.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/stump-chump-can-sketch-profile-change-function-length-sweep-curve.html#respond Fri, 10 Mar 2017 13:00:25 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31998
This is the first in a series of blogs that will delve into common questions or problems that users encounter daily and present answers from other users as well as a weigh-in from a SOLIDWORKS expert.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Stump the Chump: Can a Sketch Profile Change as a Function of the Length of the Sweep Curve? appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Welcome to the latest blog series from SOLIDWORKS. Each month, our new “Stump the Chump” post will delve into common questions and/or challenges that our users encounter on a regular basis and will present various ways to solve them. While we have a large team of seasoned CAD veterans at SOLIDWORKS who can answer user questions, we also have the most passionate and best CAD user community in the world. So in this blog series, we will share advice, tips and suggestions in response to real questions posted by YOU in the SOLIDWORKS User Forums.

We will scour the SOLIDWORKS User Forums for questions and challenges that are relatively common among our users. If after reading this “Stump the Chump” post, you have an alternative answer or simply have additional questions, feel free to add it to the comments section below. So without further ado, here’s the first question:

Question: Sweep along a curve. Can the sketch profile dimension change as a function of the length of the sweep curve?? Like the diameter of a sketch circle, which becomes bigger and bigger as the square root of the length of the path?

User Answer: Depending on how complex your profile and sweep path curve are, you may be able to use a guide curve (or curves) to drive the dimension of the profile. In this quick example the 0.5 radius circle is the profile sketch, and the end diameter is determined by the guide curve, the size of which is driven by an equation linked to the length of the sweep path.

In this example, I replaced the 3-point arc guide curve with a freeform spline.

If you need the profile to change a lot, a loft might be more appropriate.  Don’t forget, you can use guide curves to refine the shape of a loft too. If you can post more details, and/or an example of what sort of shape you’re trying to get, someone can probably give you some more detailed advice.

Follow-up question: Thanks so much for your help. I am 90% home…
If I try to have the length of the sweep curve in the sketch as one dimension, then I make your suggested equation to make the circle diameter driven by this length of the sweep curve. But, then I get only a constant diameter through the whole sweep – the last value. How do I get the parameter throughout the sweep, starting as zero and ending as the length of the sweep curve?

User Answer: You will need to use a loft, from a point to a circle. You can’t just reduce a circle profile to zero in diameter in SOLIDWORKS.  A mathematician might see a point and a zero diameter circle as the same thing, but SOLIDWORKS doesn’t. A circle has to have a diameter, even a really small one. So if you need a point at one end, you’ll need to make a loft with a centerline. 

Below: Sketch1 is the curve that is used for the center line, and to locate the end point. Sketch3 is just a sketch point, placed coincident to the end of the curve in Sketch1. Sketch2 is a circle, centered on the other end of the curve in Sketch1. We set the diameter of the circle equal to the length of the curve so it would be parametric. If you know the length of your curve, and you know it’s not going to change, you could just put the dimension on the circle and not bother with the equation. You don’t say if your curve is a simple arc like we’re using here, or something more complex. With the arc, as we have it set up here, you can’t go much beyond 113° without having the loft turning in on itself and failing. The shape of your curve and the end diameter will determine what you can get away with. Also note that the loft gets bigger uniformly as it follows the centerline.  If you want a more complex transition from point to end diameter, you will need to add guide curves, more profiles, play with the start and end constraints, or a combination of some, or all, of the above.

SOLIDWORKS Expert Weigh-In: Another way to approach this problem is to create the sweep using an equation-driven curve. The blue circular profile (shown below) is swept along the green sweep path and the diameter of the profile is controlled by the equation-driven curve.

Watch the video below to see how it’s done.

 

Thank you to Mogan Fons for the question and to Logan Pegler and Erik Bilello for providing solutions in the SOLIDWORKS User Forum. If you have a question that you would like to pose to the greater SOLIDWORKS user community or to provide tips and tricks to your peers, our User Forums are a great resource. Access the SOLIDWORKS User Forums here.

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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Available Now: SOLIDWORKS Self-Paced eCourses http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/available-now-solidworks-self-paced-ecourses.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/available-now-solidworks-self-paced-ecourses.html#respond Thu, 09 Mar 2017 13:30:12 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32019
Experience the convenience to learn what you want, where you want, when you want. Now you can access a library of self-paced, high-quality, interactive eCourses providing you with the opportunity to learn on your terms.

Author information

Joe Rousseau

Joe Rousseau

Joe is a Senior Training Manager, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post Available Now: SOLIDWORKS Self-Paced eCourses appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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We all know that learning in a classroom is one of the best ways to learn SOLIDWORKS, but sometimes it’s not possible to attend a live class. You need the convenience to learn what you want, where you want. SOLIDWORKS is pleased to announce a library of self-paced, high quality, interactive eCourses that offer learning on your schedule.

You might be wondering what separates a SOLIDWORKS eCourse from other eLearning options. SOLIDWORKS eCourses include:

  • Everything from the SOLIDWORKS instructor-led training manual in a self-paced eLearning format
  • Background information and key concepts
  • Subject-matter expert videos and demonstrations
  • Interactive simulations that allow you to make the picks and clicks yourself
  • Offline exercises that allow independent study and further practice

The initial launch of this program includes eight eCourses:

SOLIDWORKS eCourses are hosted on MySolidWorks and are available for purchase from your SOLIDWORKS reseller as a three-month subscription.

For more information about the SOLIDWORKS eCourses and other training options, visit http://my.solidworks.com/training. To sign up for a SOLIDWORKS eCourse, please contact your reseller.

Author information

Joe Rousseau
Joe Rousseau
Joe is a Senior Training Manager, Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post Available Now: SOLIDWORKS Self-Paced eCourses appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Zeta Group Streamlines Automated Systems By Switching From 2D to SOLIDWORKS Electrical http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/zeta-group-streamlines-automated-systems-switching-2d-solidworks-electrical.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/zeta-group-streamlines-automated-systems-switching-2d-solidworks-electrical.html#respond Wed, 08 Mar 2017 13:00:28 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=32011
Read how Zeta Group LLC cut their design cycle by 50% by switching from 2D to SOLIDWORKS Solutions.

Author information

Josie Morales

Josie Morales

Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post Zeta Group Streamlines Automated Systems By Switching From 2D to SOLIDWORKS Electrical appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Are you always looking for ways to speed up your processes and create better designs faster? Are you finding that your 2D solution is no longer providing you with the same productivity? Zeta Group LLC felt the same way and found success by switching over to SOLIDWORKS Solutions. Let’s take a look at their story.

Founded in 2010, Zeta Group LLC is a product design, engineering, and manufacturing consulting company that focuses on automating manufacturing systems development and production for its clients. The company strives to develop advanced automated manufacturing systems that are unmatched in terms of speed and quality.

While Zeta Group has used SOLIDWORKS from the start, the company’s designers still relied on AutoCAD to design the systems’ electrical subsystems. However, after hitting many roadblocks and wasting numerous hours manually updating and rechecking last-minute changes to schematics, they needed to find a better solution. Finding that their current 2D solution was slowing them down, they started to look for alternatives for their electrical needs.

Zeta Group implemented SOLIDWORKS Electrical 3D design and SOLIDWORKS Electrical Schematic software in 2013 because the software is easy to use, is integrated with SOLIDWORKS mechanical design tools, and makes design changes less costly and more efficient.

“Because we’ve replaced using 2D mechanical CAD with intelligent, parametric SOLIDWORKS Electrical software for creating schematics, we are saving time overall and are much more efficient at handling design changes,” stresses Kevin Marrick, president of Zeta Group LLC.

By implementing SOLIDWORKS Electrical design solutions, Zeta Group can incorporate design changes that affect electrical systems quickly and easily, eliminating the manual time sink that such changes would previously require and leading to overall design cycle reductions of 50 percent.

Read the entire story on Zeta Group Engineering and find out more about how its 2D to SOLIDWORKS Electrical switch allowed the company to make more efficient automated manufacturing systems in less time. Click here to read more!

 

Author information

Josie Morales
Josie Morales
Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post Zeta Group Streamlines Automated Systems By Switching From 2D to SOLIDWORKS Electrical appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Users in Japan Test Drive SOLIDWORKS 2017 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/users-japan-test-drive-solidworks-2017.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/users-japan-test-drive-solidworks-2017.html#respond Tue, 07 Mar 2017 14:21:38 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31987
Get SOLIDWORKS 2017 insight from the R&D team and hear users from Japan share features they're excited to add to their workflows.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Users in Japan Test Drive SOLIDWORKS 2017 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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The amazing SOLIDWORKS R&D team travels the world and scours the Web for user feedback. This exercise is especially critical during the annual SOLIDWORKS beta period. Prior to each release, the development team visits users and invites them to test out new features and enhancements. The thoughts users share during the yearly beta program are critical to providing you with the best possible product design and engineering ecosystem.

Before the SOLIDWORKS 2017 release, the team in Japan sat down with local users and members of the Global R&D team to discuss specific development areas and favorite new features. In this video, you’ll hear members of the SOLIDWORKS R&D team, including Marlon Banta, Wenzhong Zhao, and Kevin O’Neill, discuss key focus areas and features including quality and performance, 3D Interconnect, Facility Layout and Magnetic Mates. In addition, you’ll hear users explain their preferred updates on everything from the UI to Inspection.

In this video, SOLIDWORKS users, Kumiko Yamaguchi and Yoshihiro Dobashi discuss additional updates and why they feel that the features will benefit their work moving forward. The R&D team also returns to discuss updates in quality, MBD and animation.

Have you tried SOLIDWORKS 2017 yet? If not, you can actually TRY IT NOW! The new online trial offered through MySolidWorks is available anytime, anywhere, and on any device. CLICK HERE to get started.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Users in Japan Test Drive SOLIDWORKS 2017 appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/brewing-electricity-solidworks-brewery.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/brewing-electricity-solidworks-brewery.html#respond Mon, 06 Mar 2017 13:00:36 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31967
This blog post explains how SOLIDWORKS is used throughout the brewing process and invites readers to register for a 22-Minute Webinar talking about this home brewing system and how you can take advantage of the features built into SOLIDWORKS Electrical and apply them to your own projects.

Author information

JP Emanuele

JP Emanuele

JP is a Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, North America.

The post Brewing with Electricity: The SOLIDWORKS Brewery appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Unless you’ve been living under a rock (or maybe in your parent’s basement), you can’t help but notice the incredible boom within the North American craft brewing industry. I was curious so I performed a simple search using www.brewerymap.com, and found that there are 249 breweries within 100 miles of our SOLIDWORKS headquarters in Waltham, Massachusetts. That’s amazing!

To put it slightly more into perspective, there are so many breweries opening up in the United States, that there is actually a shortage of hops, but we’ll save that topic for another time.

So for a beer geek like myself who enjoys these flavorful and pungent beverages, my fridge is usually stocked with a wide variety of choices – from a chocolate-flavored stout, or a hopped-up IPA, or even a lip-puckering sour gose. The easiest way for me to get my hands on these brews is to simply peruse my local package store (aka beverage barn or liquor store for those not from New England) that offers a great selection of craft beers.

But sometimes, shopping at my local package store just isn’t enough, because some of the most sought-after beers can’t be found on any of the local distribution lists. So there’s only one solution to this problem – and that equals, a road trip.

In my role as a technical manager, I get to travel quite a bit, and I’ve been lucky enough to have visited quite a few breweries all across the United States, and lucky for me, many of the best (in my opinion) are right here in New England. When visiting these craft brew houses, you typically have to wait in line with giddy anticipation like a child waiting for Christmas morning. I definitely get excited about wrapping my fingers around a frosty can of some new concoction they’ve conjured up. But as an engineer, what I truly love checking out is the actual brewing process – even if it’s just a small glimpse into the heart and soul of these little shops.

Now granted, it’s not always possible due to the large volume of people who share this affinity for craft beer, but I try to stick around the shop and observe the brewers as they are hard at work creating a masterpiece we can all enjoy. Watching them dump huge bags of grain into a mash tun, or pour buckets of citra hops into a massive kettle, or even witnessing the automated seamless motion of the canning process. It all brings a twinkle to my eye.

Sometimes, when I get the chance to see a brewery in action, I give myself a sly smirk, pointing to things around the room with a slight nod of my head, and think, “look at all this awesome equipment,” and “that thing was designed in SOLIDWORKS, and that was designed in SOLIDWORKS, and that, and also that.” This tasty beer I’m holding in my hand wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for SOLIDWORKS.

So I came up with an idea. What’s the one thing all of these breweries have in common? It’s that they all started in someone’s kitchen, basement, or garage – just like I do when I break out my own home brew kit. So I decided to take my love for SOLIDWORKS and my interest in craft brewing and combine them to create a SOLIDWORKS Electrical project, as well as an entirely new SOLIDWORKS assembly. I call it – The SOLIDWORKS Brewery.


It’s a digital brewery that we can use to mock up new layouts for the home brewing floorplan. We use SOLIDWORKS Electrical to route the wires, cables, and hoses for the control cabinet and pumps, or render our assembly in SOLIDWORKS Visualize to create an extremely realistic view.

And down the road, I plan to use SOLIDWORKS Simulation to run scenarios on the kettles and heating elements, use SOLIDWORKS PCB to create a new circuit board for more intelligent automation, even use Weldments on our brewery tables, Sheet Metal on our exhaust duct, plus several other features as well. Sounds cool right?

I also conducted a 22-Minute Webinar talking about this home brewing system and how you can take advantage of the features built into SOLIDWORKS Electrical and apply them to your own projects. Click here and register to watch the recorded webinar!

Still looking for more? Here’s the best part. In a few weeks’ time, my SOLIDWORKS teammates and I will be brewing an actual beer using the same electric brewing system you see here in our digital brewery. We will be producing a video mini-series that walks us through the various stages of the brewing process while we also cover several features, tips, and tricks related to SOLIDWORKS Electrical. Read this blog post to get an introduction to the Brewing with Electricity project.

I am extremely excited about this interactive project we’re creating and we hope you will be too. So keep an eye out and your taste buds ready for more information about this awesome brewing adventure with The SOLIDWORKS Brewery. If you’re a fan of Twitter, you can follow me @SWECAD.

Watch the homebrewing with SOLIDWORKS webinar today. Click here and register to watch the recorded webinar!

Author information

JP Emanuele
JP Emanuele
JP is a Territory Technical Manager, SOLIDWORKS Electrical, North America.

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Chairslayer Foundation Accelerates Accessibility with SOLIDWORKS http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/chairslayer-foundation-accelerates-accessibility-solidworks.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/chairslayer-foundation-accelerates-accessibility-solidworks.html#respond Thu, 02 Mar 2017 13:00:49 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31948
Watch this Born to Design video to learn how the Chairslayers Foundation is using SOLIDWORKS to create the world’s most advanced hand-control system for drifting, and inspiring people with disabilities to push beyond their comfort zones.

Author information

Barbara Schmitz

Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks

Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

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After an accident that occurred in 2011, professional driver Rob Parsons discovered he would never walk again. He didn’t let this tragedy sideline him from his chosen profession, however. As soon as he was able to leave the hospital, Rob went back to his shop to start working again.

His mission: to find a way to enable disabled drivers like himself to race drift cars. So when he realized the device he needed to drive didn’t exist, he set out on a mission to create it—then share it with the world. He started with a unique hand-controlled clutch system that enables disabled drivers to disengage the clutch as fast as or faster than the human foot.

Using SOLIDWORKS, Parsons was able to create the world’s most advanced hand-control clutch and braking system that enables the driver using hand controls to disengage the clutch at 95 milliseconds. Parsons also used SOLIDWORKS to design the car’s roll cage, which was built to strengthen the chassis as well as for safety and rollovers and side impacts.

 

The biggest issue with its design was Parson’s ability to physically get in and out of the vehicle. “Typically you would get in, measure it, get out, and fit a piece,” says Parsons. Instead Parsons got in the vehicle and did a 3D scan of the inside of the chassis, and imported that data file into SOLIDWORKS. “Then we build the roll cage around that 3D model that we scanned. Everything in the software just helps save time, and you can create a whole product that you can pretty much see if it’ll work before you even make it.”

As he was building the car, Parsons realized that there were many others who were interested in his groundbreaking hand-control driving system and decided to start a foundation to share and enable others to have the unique opportunity to drive his car. “We bring guys out, we get them on the track, and we teach them how to drive,” says Parsons. “People get so down on themselves because they don’t think they can do something and just getting inside the vehicle and driving it, it completely changed their lives.”

Click on the banner below to watch the entire Born to Desigh video to learn how Rob’s nonprofit, Chairslayer Foundation, is using SOLIDWORKS to create the world’s most advanced hand-control system for drifting, and inspiring people with disabilities to push beyond their comfort zones.

 

Author information

Barbara Schmitz
Barbara Schmitz
Senior Brand Introduction Manager at SolidWorks
Loyal dog owner, travel bum, cool mom, and lover of hoppy IPAs, alternative music and cool tech.

The post Chairslayer Foundation Accelerates Accessibility with SOLIDWORKS appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Learn About Custom Text Position Feature in SOLIDWORKS MBD http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/learn-custom-text-position-feature-solidworks-mbd.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/03/learn-custom-text-position-feature-solidworks-mbd.html#respond Wed, 01 Mar 2017 13:00:44 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31879
This blog explains how to use the Custom Text Position feature in SOLIDWORKS MBD.

Author information

Chris Pagliarini

Chris Pagliarini

Chris is a Roles Portfolio Management Intern currently studying at Wentworth Institute of Technology

The post Learn About Custom Text Position Feature in SOLIDWORKS MBD appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed many standards and recommendations for defining product manufacturing information. These standards are important to ensure your product is built safely and properly. Often times, these standards are related to the orientation of dimensions and callouts to aid the manufacturer in processing the information as clearly as possible. The only problem is that these specified orientations for dimensions can be frustrating and time consuming for the designer to achieve in a 3D environment.

With SOLIDWORKS Model-Based Definition, annotations and dimensions can be aligned and oriented with ease. Check out NIST’s PMI test cases here.

SOLIDWORKS DimXpert offers a custom text position feature that allows users to orient a dimension to more readable formats. With this new enhancement those poorly oriented dimensions that are seen below can be fixed in an instant.

To find and use this wonderful feature, simply select any DimXpert annotation or callout contained in the SOLIDWORKS environment. Within the DimXpert property manager under the leaders tab, users will find the custom text position options at the bottom.

By default the feature is deselected. Once the box is selected SOLIDWORKS presents the user with three separate options for positioning the dimension.

Option 1: Solid leader, aligned text

Figure 2: Option example 1

Figure 3: Option 1 example 2

This option creates a solid leader that extends underneath the DimXpert annotation. The annotation text and leader are aligned on the same axis.

Option 2: Broken leader horizontal text

 

Figure 4: Hole callout oriented horizontally according to its assigned annotation view

The annotation is oriented horizontal to the annotation view that it is associated with. In this case it appears to be oriented vertically to the user’s perspective but is actually horizontal to its assigned viewing plane, which can be seen below.

Notice the option boxed in red called “horizontal direction.” Here the user can rotate any annotation view to control how dimensions and callouts are oriented. Simply right click any annotation view in the DimXpert manager and select edit annotation view. The annotation view can be rotated a full 360˚.

Option 3: Broken Leader, Aligned Text

Figure 6: Option 3 example 1

Figure 7: Option 3 example 2

This option is very similar to option one except the leader does not extend underneath the annotation. Both the annotation and the leader will be aligned along the same axis. The custom text position feature is a very valuable tool in aligning DimXpert annotations to fit your needs. Every model is different in its own way and to account for this, SOLIDWORKS MBD needs to be versatile in the way it orients and displays product manufacturing information. With this handy capability, MBD is one step closer to giving users a seamless journey between design and manufacturing. Check out this quick video showing the functionality of custom text positions.

 

Author information

Chris Pagliarini
Chris Pagliarini
Chris is a Roles Portfolio Management Intern currently studying at Wentworth Institute of Technology

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Schooled in SOLIDWORKS Series: Shockingly good tips from a SOLIDWORKS Electrical Technical Manager http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/schooled-solidworks-series-shockingly-good-tips-solidworks-electrical-technical-manager.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/schooled-solidworks-series-shockingly-good-tips-solidworks-electrical-technical-manager.html#respond Tue, 28 Feb 2017 12:00:55 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31937 SOLIDWORKS_Electrical_Webinar_Profile_Javier
Level-up your SOLIDWORKS skills as our inside experts reveal features you never knew existed. In this month’s webinar, find out how you can use SOLIDWORKS Electrical to slash manufacturing costs through automated routing.   The best way to learn is

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Schooled in SOLIDWORKS Series: Shockingly good tips from a SOLIDWORKS Electrical Technical Manager appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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SOLIDWORKS_Electrical_Webinar_Profile_Javier

Level-up your SOLIDWORKS skills as our inside experts reveal features you never knew existed. In this month’s webinar, find out how you can use SOLIDWORKS Electrical to slash manufacturing costs through automated routing.  

The best way to learn is to do. The second best? Pluck advice from people who are aces in their field. To help you do just that, SOLIDWORKS is holding a series of webinars hosted by the crème de la crème in our company. It’s your chance to hear from the people who know SOLIDWORKS products like the back of their hand…The next best thing to being in a room with them.

Register to join the webinar here.

Each month an expert member of our team will share tips on how to get the most from SOLIDWORKS. You will learn to use our product not just as a design tool, but as a means to ease business challenges and ignite rapid progress towards your strategic goals. Sit back and power-up your knowledge of the world’s most advanced 3D design software. Submit questions at the end.

SOLIDWORKS_Electrical_Webinar_Profile_Javier

But hurry, you need to register your interest to benefit from the inside knowledge.

This month we talk to Javier González, Technical Manager for SOLIDWORKS Electrical in the UK and across Scandinavia.

Here’s a Q&A to introduce his webinar…

>> Or register your interest now

  1. Please introduce yourself…

I am Javier González, Technical Manager for SOLIDWORKS Electrical for the UK and Nordic countries. Since I joined SOLIDWORKS in 2012, I’ve been working with our resellers worldwide in order to give visibility to our products and I constantly visit customers to understand what we can do to improve their design experience and manufacturing cycle. Although I spend most of my time in the field, I am based in Barcelona.

  1. What is your webinar about, who is it for and why should I attend?

This webinar will show attendees how to design electrical cabinets and create connections automatically between them, based on user preferences. This makes for quick and easy generation of manufacturing documents, as well as the early detection of errors, speeding time to market and reducing project cost.

  1. What’s your best quick tip for anyone using SOLIDWORKS Electrical?

I think potential users should consider that they no longer need to accept costs that have historically been part of the design and production cycle. Problems with documentation lead to problems with prototypes. With SOLIDWORKS Electrical, those problems are gone.

  1. What’s your favourite feature of SOLIDWORKS Electrical?

From the customer perspective and because of the impact in costing procedures, that would have to be the automated routing feature.

  1. What makes automated routing so good?

Automated routing allows SOLIDWORKS users to create connections based on the positioning of the components in a 3D environment. Finding the optimal route for each wire created is near effortless. This significantly reduces scrap material and manufacturing costs.

  1. When does your webinar take place?

9.30 am-10.00 am GMT on March 16th. Register here.

If you would like further information on any SOLIDWORKS products, please complete your details here, and we will be in touch with you shortly.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Schooled in SOLIDWORKS Series: Shockingly good tips from a SOLIDWORKS Electrical Technical Manager appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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It Pays to Share: Local Cache Management in SOLIDWORKS PDM http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/pays-share-local-cache-management-solidworks-pdm.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/pays-share-local-cache-management-solidworks-pdm.html#respond Mon, 27 Feb 2017 13:00:17 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31909
This is a blog post about local cache management functionality in SOLIDWORKS PDM.

Author information

Mike Spens

Mike Spens

Technical Manager, PDM and Electrical products at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post It Pays to Share: Local Cache Management in SOLIDWORKS PDM appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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How often have you been there?  You’re traveling for a few days or working from home.  You have a project that is nearly finished.  You hop into your favorite design tool, SOLIDWORKS, and go to create a drawing of your brilliant design when you realize you don’t have your drawing templates.  They’re carefully shared on a network drive, on the server, at the office…and you’re not there.  Commence eye rolling and cursing.  OK, maybe later.  At least you can add those finishing touches to the assembly.  There are still a few unplaced fasteners…but Toolbox is also shared on that same !$#$% server.

That’s when many of us decide, to the dismay of our IT department, that we need our own personal copy of everything.  But then we gripe and grumble about the micro assembly designed by a colleague that opens with giant, default fasteners on our machine, and about the drawings that don’t share the agreed-upon templates and settings.

There is a better way!  SOLIDWORKS PDM, Standard and Professional can be set to automatically copy or refresh everything from selected folders – every time you log in.  You can have an up-to-date copy of the most important content, whether you’re connected or offline.  That includes Design Libraries, templates, Toolbox or anything else for that matter.  It doesn’t just apply to SOLIDWORKS either.  Shared libraries for any application can be synchronized the same way if they can be set as a folder location.

You can set Cache Options for a user or group in the SOLIDWORKS PDM Administration tool.  To do this, first select the Cache Options category and select a folder.  Check “Refresh cache during log in.”  Turn it on for as many folders as needed.  The setting applies to all sub-folders automatically.

When the user logs in, if they already have the latest files, nothing happens.  If a newer version exists on the server, the file is updated locally.  If it’s their first time logging in, the files are all copied to their local view and the user is ready to design.

You probably noticed the option to clear files during logout as well.  Consider this option for sensitive data folders that shouldn’t be left on a user’s local computer.

Either way you use them, the SOLIDWORKS PDM Cache Options can save you the headache of making sure you have everything you need, whenever you need it.  It pays to share.

Author information

Mike Spens
Mike Spens
Technical Manager, PDM and Electrical products at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

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SOLIDWORKS Visualize: Fast Mode Just Got Faster http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/solidworks-visualize-fast-mode-just-got-faster.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/solidworks-visualize-fast-mode-just-got-faster.html#respond Thu, 23 Feb 2017 13:00:40 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31860
An update on what's new in SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2017 SP2.

Author information

Brian Hillner

Brian Hillner

Brian Hillner is the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager.

The post SOLIDWORKS Visualize: Fast Mode Just Got Faster appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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So you’ve heard only bug fixing happens during Service Packs? Not with the Visualize R&D team. We’ve got some surprises in store to brighten up your day…scratch that, speed up your day. Update now to SOLIDWORKS Visualize 2017 SP2 to take advantage of our crazy fast speed improvements!

Here’s a breakdown of the awesome speed improvements you’ll now enjoy with 2017 SP2 (Visualize Standard & Professional):

  • Improved Viewport interactivity in Fast and Accurate render modes
  • Added new Fast Rendering mode switch for even faster Fast mode
  • BONUS: extended the ‘Monitor File’ across Visualize sessions

Improved Viewport interactivity in Fast and Accurate render modes

Want to interact with your model faster when in Fast and Accurate modes? Well your wait is over. You’ve specifically asked us to improve the Viewport interactivity when rotating the camera around your model, and we’ve delivered with 2017 SP2. You’ll notice this improvement immediately; night and day over previous versions. No settings or switch to fiddle with; it just plain works…faster.

Added new Fast Rendering mode switch for even faster Fast mode

The Visualize R&D team developed a new, faster setting specifically for Fast mode. You now have the option to make Fast mode even faster, by choosing ‘Speed’ in this Fast mode setting. Easily accessible in the ‘Tools > Options > 3D Viewport’ tab, you can choose between two new Fast modes:

  • Speed: recommended for fastest interactivity in the Viewport.
    o This new Fast render setting will complete renders almost 2X faster than in previous versions, by removing self-shadowing and time-consuming reflections.
    o Ideal for projects without glass, clear plastics or transparent objects.
  • Quality: recommended for final renders…but you be the judge!
    o This new Fast render mode is actually more realistic and advanced than our previous Fast render mode! Now you can enjoy the more photorealistic Accurate mode with the blazing speeds of Fast mode. The best of both worlds.
    o If you haven’t tried Fast mode yet for your Visualize projects, then now’s definitely the time. You might be wasting loads of render time using Accurate mode, when this new Fast: Quality mode gives nearly identical results in a fraction of the time. Update to 2017 SP2 and give it a try today.

Model credit: Myomo

 

BONUS: extended the ‘Monitor File’ feature across Visualize sessions

Are you taking advantage of the powerful ‘Monitor File’ feature to CAD Live-Update your model in Visualize as design and engineering changes are made? Well, we’ve got a bonus for you in 2017 SP2. If ‘Monitor File’ is selected upon first import, Visualize will now continuously monitor your CAD file, even while Visualize is closed. As soon as you launch Visualize again, it will search for any newer version of your CAD file and immediately show a pop-up asking if you want to import the newer CAD file. This is a huge added bonus, allowing you to have a seamless workflow between your CAD tool and Visualize.

All these improvements and loads of stability enhancements are just a click away for customers on active Subscription. Click ‘Start’ and type ‘Check for Updates’ and then launch the SOLIDWORKS Check for Updates tool. You’ll be cruising with 2017 SP2 in no time and creating Visualize content faster than ever before.

Watch this video below to see these new speed improvements in Visualize 2017 SP2 in action.

 

Don’t forget to follow SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager @bhillner on twitter for product news and updates, and share your SOLIDWORKS Visualize creations on social media with #swvisualize and #gettinvizzy!

More Resources to get started with SOLIDWORKS Visualize:

WATCH A BRIEF WEBINAR OVERVIEW of SOLIDWORKS Visualize and its benefits by SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager Brian Hillner.

WATCH THE TUTORIALS to master SOLIDWORKS Visualize in no time and impress your boss with photo-quality content.

UPGRADE TO SOLIDWORKS VISUALIZE PROFESSIONAL for an enhanced 3D visualization experience. Contact your Reseller now!

 

Author information

Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner
Brian Hillner is the SOLIDWORKS Visualize Product Manager.

The post SOLIDWORKS Visualize: Fast Mode Just Got Faster appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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ZAMAK Develops Innovative Concepts Faster with SOLIDWORKS Visualize http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/zamak-develops-innovative-concepts-faster-solidworks-visualize.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/zamak-develops-innovative-concepts-faster-solidworks-visualize.html#respond Wed, 22 Feb 2017 13:30:08 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31851
Read how ZAMAK speeds up the development process by providing clients with photorealistic concepts.

Author information

Josie Morales

Josie Morales

Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post ZAMAK Develops Innovative Concepts Faster with SOLIDWORKS Visualize appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Did you click on this blog because you could see yourself lounging in that room by the ocean?  So relaxing and serene.  After the cold of winter, that’s where I want to be – in a hotel by the beach.  What if I told you that image is not an actual photo, but instead a photorealistic rendering created with SOLIDWORKS Visualize Professional, one of the  newest products in the SOLIDWORKS ecosystem?

ZAMAK design® is a leading French industrial design studio with an extensive portfolio that includes everything from kitchen appliances to hoverboards. ZAMAK works with clients, then develops concept art with SOLIDWORKS Visualize to show how these concepts can translate to the physical world.

Nicolas Michel-Imbert, former Hardware/Software Manager, explains, “For all of our projects, we need to show design concepts as realistically as possible, going beyond sketches and 3D mock-ups, to provide clients with high-quality, photorealistic renderings, so they can thoroughly visualize and understand exactly what we are proposing as quickly and cost-effectively as possible.”

For ZAMAK, it was an easy choice to standardize on SOLIDWORKS Visualize.  “SOLIDWORKS Visualize is the perfect balance of quality, speed, and ease,” says Michel-Imbert. Some renderers are fast but output low-quality images. Some produce great quality but take six months to learn. Others are easy to use, but take four hours to render an image. SOLIDWORKS Visualize provides the right combination of quality, speed, and ease of use, and is the best renderer for supporting our business.”

Read the entire story on ZAMAK Design  to find out how SOLIDWORKS Visualize allowed them to realize hundreds of hours in time savings annually and cut tens of thousands of euros in costs each year.

Don’t forget, if you own SOLIDWORKS Professional or Premium and are on active Subscription Support, you receive a complimentary license of SOLIDWORKS Visualize Standard.  If you have any questions on how to install or where to retrieve your license, contact your reseller today!

Author information

Josie Morales
Josie Morales
Josie connects with SOLIDWORKS users every day to help them share their cool and ground breaking design stories. When not speaking to users, she's binge watching everything.

The post ZAMAK Develops Innovative Concepts Faster with SOLIDWORKS Visualize appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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SOLIDWORKS Data Management Product Line Expands to Offer Distributed Data Management http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/solidworks-data-management-product-line-expands-offer-distributed-data-management.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/solidworks-data-management-product-line-expands-offer-distributed-data-management.html#respond Tue, 21 Feb 2017 16:00:10 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31675
As announced at SOLIDWORKS World 2017 in Los Angles, we are adding a new data management product to our product line called SOLIDWORKS Manage. SOLIDWORKS Manage will leverage the ease of use and familiar Windows Explorer interface of SOLIDWORKS PDM

Author information

Kurt Lundstedt

Kurt Lundstedt

Product Manager - PDM Solutions at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

The post SOLIDWORKS Data Management Product Line Expands to Offer Distributed Data Management appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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As announced at SOLIDWORKS World 2017 in Los Angles, we are adding a new data management product to our product line called SOLIDWORKS Manage. SOLIDWORKS Manage will leverage the ease of use and familiar Windows Explorer interface of SOLIDWORKS PDM with advanced capabilities to manage project timelines and resources, complex business processes, and advanced item management.  SOLIDWORKS Manage will also offer a powerful dashboard and reporting functionality to provide instant access to critical information. Current SOLIDWORKS PDM Professional customers will be able to easily upgrade to SOLIDWORKS Manage and start taking advantage of the new capabilities quickly.

SOLIDWORKS Manage will be able to take the place of separate disconnected tools an organization may be using to manage engineering resources and processes. For instance, we see organizations using Microsoft Excel to manage project timelines, which require a lot of time to keep updated and monitoring of user progress. With the project management functionality in SOLIDWORKS Manage, organizations can plan each stage of their projects, assign resources and tasks, and attach required documentation to the project. When users complete their work, project progress is automatically updated. Project managers can take advantage of the powerful Dashboard capabilities to see critical information in one easy-to-understand interface.

We are also adding great new functionality to our existing data management products: SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard and Professional. As shown in the What’s New in SOLIDWORKS 2018 presentation, we are adding automated SOLIDWORKS revision table capabilities to both SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard and Professional. This new feature will update revision table information based on the drawing approval workflow and read user-entered information from the revision table into the file’s data card. In addition our SOLIDWORKS PDM Standard customers will now be able to automatically create PDFs of their SOLDIWORKS drawings at various points in their workflow. For example when a SOLIDWORKS drawing gets final approval, the PDF can be automatically generated.


The SOLIDWORKS 2018 data management product line will provide broad scalability and a wide range of capabilities from simple, easy-to-use SOLIDWORKS file management to full project, process and item management. When their needs grow, their data management system can easily grow with them without data migration. This provides customers with the ability to distribute data management to many different areas of their business.

To see how SOLIDWORKS data management products can help streamline your business, please click here or visit http://www.solidworks.com/sw/products/product-data-management/solidworks-enterprise-pdm.htm.

Author information

Kurt Lundstedt
Kurt Lundstedt
Product Manager - PDM Solutions at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

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Schooled in SOLIDWORKS Series: Quick tips from our UK Technical Manager http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/schooled-solidworks.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/schooled-solidworks.html#respond Tue, 14 Feb 2017 12:00:26 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31843
Level-up your SOLIDWORKS skills as our inside experts reveal features you never knew existed. In this month’s webinar, find out how you can use SOLIDWORKS MBD to improve quoting, CAM, CMM and more. The best way to learn is to

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Schooled in SOLIDWORKS Series: Quick tips from our UK Technical Manager appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Level-up your SOLIDWORKS skills as our inside experts reveal features you never knew existed. In this month’s webinar, find out how you can use SOLIDWORKS MBD to improve quoting, CAM, CMM and more.

The best way to learn is to do. The second best? Pluck advice from people who are aces in their field. To help you do just that, SOLIDWORKS is holding a series of webinars hosted by the crème de la crème in our company. It’s your chance to hear from the people who know SOLIDWORKS products like the back of their hand… The next best thing to being in a room with them.

Each month an expert member of our team will share tips on how to get the most from SOLIDWORKS. You will learn to use our product not just as a design tool, but as a means to ease business challenges and ignite rapid progress towards your strategic goals. Sit back and power-up your knowledge of the world’s most advanced 3D design software. Submit your questions at the end.

This month we talk to Alan Coles, Technical Manager for SOLIDWORKS in the UK & Ireland.

Here’s a Q&A to introduce his webinar…

> Or register your interest now

  1. Please introduce yourself…

I’m Alan Coles, Technical Manager for SOLIDWORKS in the UK and Ireland. My role is to support our excellent network of Value Added Resellers in selling our products. I’ve been in this role for four years, but have been part of the SOLIDWORKS community since 2003. I’m based near the Dassault Systemes Cambridge office.

  1. What is your webinar about, who is it for and why should I attend?

This webinar will highlight how using a model-based approach, instead of 2D drawings, can save significant time and cost during your product development process. If you’re curious to learn about a more efficient way to communicate your manufacturing intent, this webinar is for you.

  1. What’s your best quick tip for anyone using SOLIDWORKS MBD?

My suggestion for any companies considering SOLIDWORKS MBD would be to think beyond just the model. There are a lot of downstream benefits of a model-based approach. These include tolerance analysis, CAM, CMM, quoting, process planning and more – whether your product development process is completed in-house or outsourced. We’ll discuss this in the webinar.

  1. What’s your favourite feature of SOLIDWORKS MBD?

From a user point of view, it’s got to be ‘Tolerance Status’.

  1. What makes Tolerance Status your favourite feature?

It gives immediate visual feedback to confirm if your model is fully defined for manufacture. This is a laborious task in 2D, a major source of error and a common cause for drawing queries.

  1. When does your webinar take place?

9.30am GMT – 10.00am GMT on February 23rd  This webinar will be hosted from the UK. Register here: http://www.solidworks.com/registerMBDwebinar_blog_0217/

 

If you would like further information on any SOLIDWORKS products, please complete your details here, and we will be in touch with you shortly:  http://www.solidworks.com/contactsales_webinar_blog_2017/

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS UK
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post Schooled in SOLIDWORKS Series: Quick tips from our UK Technical Manager appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Introducing SOLIDWORKS CAM: a Smart Manufacturing Ecosystem http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/introducing-solidworks-cam-smart-manufacturing-ecosystem.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/introducing-solidworks-cam-smart-manufacturing-ecosystem.html#respond Mon, 13 Feb 2017 16:51:33 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31726
SOLIDWORKS CAM is a 2.5-axis milling and turning solution that is powered by CAMWorks, a SOLIDWORKS Gold-level solution partner in CAM since 1998. SOLIDWORKS CAM will allow users to program in either part or assembly environments. In addition, SOLIDWORKS CAM

Author information

Mike Buchli

Mike Buchli

Mike is a Senior SolidWorks Product & Portfolio Manager at Dassault Systèmes

The post Introducing SOLIDWORKS CAM: a Smart Manufacturing Ecosystem appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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SOLIDWORKS CAM is a 2.5-axis milling and turning solution that is powered by CAMWorks, a SOLIDWORKS Gold-level solution partner in CAM since 1998. SOLIDWORKS CAM will allow users to program in either part or assembly environments. In addition, SOLIDWORKS CAM will also be able to work with configurations of components to expedite the programming process.

Over the last several years, SOLIDWORKS has been building a Smart Manufacturing ecosystem. Components of this ecosystem, such as Costing, Inspection, and Model-Based Definition (MBD), have been a priority to take the next logical step that will improve efficiency for our users. Having integrated CAM capabilities is becoming more important than ever; especially when efficiency is involved. For example, users want to be able to check their components for manufacturability earlier in design process.  Using an integrated CAM system makes it easier to learn and understand how your components will transition from bits to atoms. Integrated CAM also allows for automatic updating of toolpaths because the CAM system can read changes as you make updates to parts.

This push to boost efficiency is manifesting itself in practice as validated by surveys and research reports. One example is Business Advantage’s CAD Trends Survey, which found that 34 percent of CAD users increased their use of CAM last year.  Of those surveyed, 70 percent think it’s “important” (36 percent think it is “very important” and 34 percent “quite important”) to have machining instructions automatically generated from 3D CAD models.  Six in ten (61 percent) want to see “more” (half of them want to see “much more”) software development effort on CAD/CAM integration.

Based on these trends, and the previous work on Smart Manufacturing ecosystem updates, the foundation of SOLIDWORKS CAM, Knowledge-Based Machining (KBM), was created.  KBM will allow companies to define standard machining strategies that can be used by everyone within their organization from quoting to programming.  This standardization will ensure that everyone is on the same page, which will reduce errors during the design-to-manufacturing process.  The more consistent a company can leverage existing data and processes, the more efficiently they can produce their products.  Consistency in workflow has been shown to reduce cycle times, improve quality and boost employee satisfaction.

SOLIDWORKS CAM is available for Beta starting April 1, 2017.  Commercial release for SOLIDWORKS CAM will be available with the release of SOLIDWORKS 2018. To learn more about SOLIDWORKS CAM

Author information

Mike Buchli
Mike Buchli
Mike is a Senior SolidWorks Product & Portfolio Manager at Dassault Systèmes

The post Introducing SOLIDWORKS CAM: a Smart Manufacturing Ecosystem appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Introducing Simulation Engineer http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/introducing-simulation-engineer.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/introducing-simulation-engineer.html#respond Fri, 10 Feb 2017 14:46:00 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31688
At SOLIDWORKS World we announced the imminent launch of Simulation Engineer, a new structural analysis solution from our sister brand SIMULIA. And I was asked at the event why we need a new structural analysis solution, when we already have

Author information

Stephen Endersby

Stephen Endersby

Product Manager at SolidWorks

The post Introducing Simulation Engineer appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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At SOLIDWORKS World we announced the imminent launch of Simulation Engineer, a new structural analysis solution from our sister brand SIMULIA. And I was asked at the event why we need a new structural analysis solution, when we already have a very good solution with the SOLIDWORKS Simulation suite of tools. To answer this, I am going to have to take a step back…

To the casual observer it may seem that all structural simulation is the same.  Model your components, apply materials and some loads and away you go.  Sadly, that isn’t always the case. As with all things complexities arise as more conditions and behaviors have to be considered. To my mind, structural analysis ranges from the straightforward to brain scathingly difficult. Taking a simplistic view, and ignoring many aspects of structural analysis, I have ranked some of the basic tasks:

In the same way that not all cars are equal, not all structural analysis solvers are either. So what is an optimal solution for solving low-complexity problems is probably not the best for high-complexity problems although they are still both structural analysis solvers. As a result, we need to offer a range of solutions that deliver the best experience across a wide range of problems.

This is where the new Simulation Engineer solution comes in. It is tailored to solve very complex structural problems but can it solve the relatively simple cases? Yes, however, it would be like using a sledgehammer to crack a nut. The new Simulation Engineer solution expands the coverage of the SOLIDWORKS Simulation portfolio by delivering the world-leading Abaqus solver on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform.

SOLIDWORKS has spent the last 15 years making structural analysis more accessible through UI and workflow improvements that enable any designer to setup, run and understand their results directly inside of their CAD workflow. This focus has not dimmed with the introduction of Simulation Engineer. For example, while Simulation Engineer is on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform, users can easily access and use this powerful solution with ‘one click’ from within their familiar SOLIDWORKS Simulation environment. This ‘one click’ will transfer geometry, materials and many boundary conditions over to the 3DEXPERIENCE platform kick starting the solution. One click, it’s as easy as making a purchase on Amazon. In addition to a new solver, Simulation Engineer users will benefit from a wide range of material models and a robust and automatic contact setup together with advanced meshing tools.  Together these technologies from SIMULIA result in a product that will deliver high-accuracy solutions for the most exacting of structural simulation problems.

Simulation Engineer will be available to select customers in the first half of 2017 with a planned full worldwide availability by the end of 2017. For more information, and to stay current on Simulation Engineer updates, please visit its product page.

Author information

Stephen Endersby
Stephen Endersby
Product Manager at SolidWorks

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SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Day Three Recap: The Future http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/solidworks-world-2017-day-three-recap-future.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/solidworks-world-2017-day-three-recap-future.html#respond Wed, 08 Feb 2017 23:48:44 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31839
Day three was full of what's next in SOLIDWORKS, how customers are using SOLIDWORKS ecosystems, imagination and character.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Day Three Recap: The Future appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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Day three at SOLIDWORKS World focuses on the future. It’s about upcoming features in SOLIDWORKS, but also what’s possible for future of humanity. Before diving into day three, let’s quickly recap day two:

Kishore Boyalakuntla, SOLIDWORKS Senior Director, Product Portfolio Management and Brand User Experience Leader took the stage to discuss updates to the SOLIDWORKS product line.

First up is an update to SOLIDWORKS Make, which enables users to offer personalized products online in millions of variations, anywhere around the world. Here’s how ClearVision uses SOLIDWORKS Make to enable its customers to customize their own eyewear.

Kishore then went on to discuss four ecosystems driving SOLIDWORKS: design to manufacturing, data management, simulation and IoT.

Design to Manufacturing

With releases of MBD, Inspection, Costing, Plastics Injection Simulation, DFM, and Composer, this ecosystem has exploded over the last several years. SOLIDWORKS CAM is the latest addition, ready to bring Smart Manufacturing to your workflow. Let’s see how Ring Brothers, custom car builders, use SOLIDWORKS in their projects.

Data Management

The SOLIDWORKS data management ecosystem products have broad multi-discipline appeal within organizations because of their ease of use and familiar Windows explorer interface, which provide fast access to relevant data not achievable with generic network shares. New for SOLIDWORKS 2018 is SOLIDWORKS Manage, which adds new capabilities including:

  • Project timelines and resources
  • Complex business processes
  • Advanced Item Management
  • Dashboard and reports for critical data

Simulation

Simulation is the next ecosystem; now adding Simulation Engineer, a validation tool for solving complex structural analysis problems, such as large deformations, component contact and complex materials. Simulation Engineer is part of the 3DEXPERIENCE Platform and leverages ABAQUS technology from SIMULIA. The product can be access in one click from SOLIDWORKS. Here’s how SSA Analysis uses the Simulation Ecosystem to validate challenging engineering problems.

Internet of Things

The fourth ecosystem is the Internet of Things (IoT). Here, Kishore called upon Jon Friedman, SOLIDWORKS user and President/Co-Founder of Freight Farms, to discuss how his company is using the SOLIDWORKS IoT ecosystem to plant sustainable farms inside of shipping containers. During his talk, Jon compared Freight Farms to SOLIDWORKS. Essentially Freight Farms wants to be a platform to empower growers as SOLIDWORKS is a platform for designers and engineers.

Freight Farms’ Leafy Green Machine is a 40-ft shipping container that uses a hydroponic system to grow produce. The system is connected to regulate the atmosphere so the food grows the same in Indiana as it would in India. The yield for the Leafy Green Machine is the equivalent of 1,000 heads of lettuce per week with only 20 hours of labor required for optimal growth!

Technology and companies like Freight Farms are especially important to Duane Elgin. He’s a sustainability evangelist and futurist who understands that human ingenuity is needed to address population increases and climate change. Duane joined Jon onstage and discussed how Freight Farms can address these problems by providing sustainable food to the masses and shielding growth against an unpredictable environment. The message from Duane is that humanity needs to cope with what we’ve created. Freight Farms is one way to solve problems in a time of transition.

It’s fitting that Model Mania, the “Big Game” of modeling began just days after one of the best “Big Games” in the last 51 years. Model Mania has taken place for the last 18 years and looks to find the fastest and most accurate modelers in the SOLIDWORKS Community. Congratulations to this year’s winners!

Today the SWW17 crowd had the pleasure of hearing a talk from Anousheh Ansari. In addition to being co-founder and chairwoman of Prodeo Systems, and the Ansari X Prize, Anousheh is the first female private space explorer. Born in Iran, Anousheh always dreamt of the stars. She credits her interest in science and engineering to being highly influenced by science fiction from the works of Jules Verne to Gene Roddenberry.

Anousheh spoke of a personalized, augmented, and engineered future on earth and in space. She expressed the importance of imagination in making this future possible. It’s not a shock to hear her say this when wonder and imagination, from things like day dreaming about joining the Star Fleet, sparked so many ideas that contributed to her spending eight days on the International Space Station. To drive the point home, she quoted Einstein, “Imagination is more important than knowledge.” Anything is possible if we first have the strength to imagine it and the will to make it pass. She closed the talk with a poem of inspiration from Karen Raven:

Only as high as I reach can I grow

Only as far as I seek can I go

Only as deep as I look can I see

Only as much as I dream can I be!

As is tradition, SOLIDWORKS World ended with a look at what’s being developed for future versions of SOLIDWORKS. The Product Introduction team always produces an amazing and entertaining skit, presenting demos of these features and this year’s talent show spoof “SOLIDWORKS Next Top Modeler” was no exception. The contest pitted four aspiring designers in a competition on who can best showcase features and updates like Generative Design and 3D Interconnect. For a full run down of the proceedings, and to see the technology preview, read this post from Director of Product Introduction Kurt Anliker.

Finally, CEO Gian Paolo Bassi took the stage to thank the 5,000+ users in attendance and even more watching the live webcast for participating in this year’s event. Gian Paolo stressed that his favorite experience at SOLIDWORKS World is sharing personal stories. A “family reunion” is a common term many users state when describing SOLIDWORKS World. It may sound cliché if you’ve never been, but for those users who attend SOLIDWORKS World every year, it’s a statement as true as tomorrow’s sunrise. While the sun may have set on #SWW17, we’re not done with Los Angeles. We’re coming back to LA-LA Land for SOLIDWORKS World 2018, February 4-7, 2018 – and we’re actually hoping to bring more sun with us the next time around! Thanks for all those who attended and worked hard to make SOLIDWORKS World 2017 a great success. See you at the next reunion!

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

The post SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Day Three Recap: The Future appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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New SOLIDWORKS Ecosystems Help Accelerate Innovation, Improve Bottom Lines http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/new-solidworks-ecosystems-help-accelerate-innovation-improve-bottom-lines.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/new-solidworks-ecosystems-help-accelerate-innovation-improve-bottom-lines.html#respond Wed, 08 Feb 2017 18:42:40 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31707
At SOLIDWORKS, not only do we focus on creating great products, but we invest significant time understanding and nurturing engineering and product ecosystems. SOLIDWORKS ecosystems take the complex interactions between several disciplines such as design (MCAD and ECAD), manufacturing, service,

Author information

Kishore Boyalakuntla

Kishore Boyalakuntla

Kishore is the SOLIDWORKS Brand UX leader and and the Product Portfolio Management Senior Director.

The post New SOLIDWORKS Ecosystems Help Accelerate Innovation, Improve Bottom Lines appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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At SOLIDWORKS, not only do we focus on creating great products, but we invest significant time understanding and nurturing engineering and product ecosystems. SOLIDWORKS ecosystems take the complex interactions between several disciplines such as design (MCAD and ECAD), manufacturing, service, quality, supply chain, marketing, inventory, and end customers into account to deliver best-in-class and easy-to-use process solutions impacting business outcomes for our end customers.

We build ecosystems to improve business outcomes like accelerated innovation, expansion into new markets as well as multiple product lines, digital sales, and profitability, just to name a few. With SOLIDWORKS 2018, we are addressing four ecosystems that customers can leverage right away: Design to Manufacturing, Data Management, Simulation and IoT. This blog post will discuss the products in each ecosystem and how they were created to form a whole that will build your bottom line and accelerate innovation.

Design-to-Manufacturing Ecosystem:

At SOLIDWORKS we started with building the design-to-manufacturing ecosystem with the launch of Model-Based Definition (MBD) and SOLIDWORKS Costing. MBD is transformational in reducing manufacturing errors, accelerating design to manufacturing, and reducing communication gaps. It is the digital thread in a company that connects manufacturing to design where both stakeholders can help make designs better. Many large companies are implementing MBD to bring design and manufacturing closer than ever before. SOLIDWORKS Costing brings manufacturing thinking upfront into the design cycle. SOLIDWORKS Inspection helps connect inspection data on manufactured parts to design by automating the process.

With SOLIDWORKS 2018, we are launching SOLIDWORKS CAM as a product and in a process called ‘SOLIDWORKS SMART Manufacturing.’ Packaging and pricing will be disclosed during the SOLIDWORKS 2018 launch. SOLIDWORKS CAM is disruptive for two reasons: it will feature both tolerance-based machining and Intelligent Knowledge Base. Tolerance-based machining reads the information from SOLIDWORKS MBD and intelligently figures out the machining operations necessary to manufacture the part. This goes above the base level (step 0) of feature-based machining. Intelligent Knowledge Base learns your manufacturing behavior and intelligently adapts future manufacturing jobs to your preferences.

Data Management Ecosystem

More than 200,000 SOLIDWORKS users use SOLIDWORKS PDM to manage their data. This number of loyal SOLIDWORKS PDM users is a testament to the product’s intuitiveness, ability to manage without overhead, CAD integration, ease of implementation and effectiveness at providing a return on your investment. With SOLIDWORKS 2017, users of SOLIDWORKS Professional and Premium have PDM Standard for file management. Moving from the included PDM Standard to PDM Professional is a simple switch – there is no need for new implementation or arduous processes.

SOLIDWORKS PDM manages all products in the SOLIDWORKS portfolio including SOLIDWORKS Electrical (PCB is in the works). This is one of the key components of ecosystem thinking – SOLIDWORKS PDM managing all parts of our customers’ processes.

With SOLIDWORKS 2018, we are introducing SOLIDWORKS Manage. This product enables you to conduct Project and Process Management, Item Management and create dashboards and reports. For customers who cannot implement PLM systems, SOLIDWORKS Manage and Distributed Data Management is a game changer. More details on pricing, packaging of the product and the process will be unveiled at the SOLIDWORKS 2018 launch.

Simulation Ecosystem:

I remember in 2001 when we launched SOLIDWORKS Simulation, in some corners of the industry the feedback was, “If a designer who is not a FEA expert does simulation, they will create Frankensteins.” Obviously, that did not turn out to be the case. Most designs have a factor of safety and are small deformations. Also many designers have innate knowledge of their product and the proverbial ‘grease up their elbows,’ so they can easily interpret simulation results. SOLIDWORKS Simulation solutions cover a wide range from Structural Simulation, Fluid Flow Simulation and Plastic Injection molding simulation that are easy to use and can solve complex problems.

Also upcoming in SOLIDWORKS 2018 is Simulation Engineer from SIMULIA and a process called ‘Designer to Analyst Simulation.’ SIMULIA is a sister brand of SOLIDWORKS inside Dassault Systemes and has very high-end simulation products for Analysts and Researchers. Simulation Engineer is based on Abaqus technologies, which delivers best-in-class nonlinear solvers. Our customers now can scale from SOLIDWORKS Simulation to Simulation Engineer with one click.

IOT Ecosystem:

SOLIDWORKS has best-in-class MCAD products and we moved into ECAD as customers were telling us that many of their products in the future will be connected and managed through the IOT infrastructure. We launched SOLIDWORKS Electrical with thousands of customers using the product. Last year we launched SOLIDWORKS PCB, for Printed Circuit Board design. We’ve also partnered with Xively for the runtime management of IOT design.

SOLIDWORKS customers can design MCAD and ECAD with the disruptive innovations delivered with SOLIDWORKS and deliver runtime management of their devices with Xively. Several customers like Freight Farms are very successful in implementing this approach.

With SOLIDWORKS ecosystems of ‘Design to Manufacturing,’ ‘Data Management,’ ‘Designer to Analyst Simulation’ and ‘IOT,’ customers can innovate and scale with industry-leading products and processes. Please let us know if you want more information your reseller partner and SOLIDWORKS team is ready to assist you in your journey.

Author information

Kishore Boyalakuntla
Kishore Boyalakuntla
Kishore is the SOLIDWORKS Brand UX leader and and the Product Portfolio Management Senior Director.

The post New SOLIDWORKS Ecosystems Help Accelerate Innovation, Improve Bottom Lines appeared first on The SOLIDWORKS Blog.

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SOLIDWORKS Next Top Modeler Previews SOLIDWORKS 2018 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/solidworks-next-top-modeler-previews-solidworks-2018.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/solidworks-next-top-modeler-previews-solidworks-2018.html#respond Wed, 08 Feb 2017 18:40:58 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31777
For the final act of SOLIDWORKS World 2017 General Session, the Product Introduction Team delivered the highly anticipated Technology Preview to show off some of the new functionality our developers are working hard to deliver in the SOLIDWORKS 2018 release.

Author information

Kurt Anliker

Kurt Anliker

Kurt is the Director of Product Introduction at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

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For the final act of SOLIDWORKS World 2017 General Session, the Product Introduction Team delivered the highly anticipated Technology Preview to show off some of the new functionality our developers are working hard to deliver in the SOLIDWORKS 2018 release. The long-standing Day 3 tradition of producing “infotainment” for our user community took a few new turns this year…here’s a quick recap…

For the 2017 version we took the skit down the path of why everyone ultimately comes to Los Angeles: to be discovered with fame and fortune to follow! With this in mind we turned the skit into a contest with each contestant delivering their most compelling performance with SOLIDWORKS. Our skit began back in December 2016 with tryouts and while there were many outstanding performances, there were only four spots in the finals. Rumor has it the contest was fixed and the finalists were chosen in advance, but this is simply untrue.

 

Lord Percy Buckingham-Smythe, our first finalist, delivered an outstanding performance showing off sketching enhancements every user will enjoy.

 

Mirror 3D Sketch Entities – When in a 3D Sketch you can now Mirror Sketch Entities

 

Sketch Planes as Symmetry Reference – 2D and 3D sketch entities can now be mirrored using a plane as the symmetry reference

 

Pen Sketching – Draw contours by freehand sketching using a pen or stylus on Windows 10 touch screen devices.

 

Our second finalist, Chesney Gallagher, showed off many new enhancements to SOLIDWORKS Assemblies that will make users much more productive… in his true Manchester style.

 

New SW Home Screen

 

Assembly Progress Bar

 

Assembly Visualization of SOLIDWORKS performance information

 

Enhanced Assembly Performance dialogue

 

Support for 12 mouse gestures

 

Use ALT key to hide surfaces during mate

 

William Roberts (aka Billy Bob), had no problem with the big stage delivering a resonating performance on 3D Interconnect enhancements that make it even easier to use non-native and neutral data formats in SOLIDWORKS.

 

3D Interconnect now supports STEP, IGES, ACIS, JT.

 

3D Interconnect supports updating neutral files.

 

3D Interconnect now preserves curves and sketches.

 

3D Interconnect now reads custom properties.

 

Finally, Tad Slater introduced Fabrication Delighters, Tab and Slot self fixturing design and SOLIDWORKS PDM enhancements.

 

New Tab and Slot feature works in parts, multi-body parts and assemblies.

 

SOLIDWORKS PDM bi-directional communication with drawing revision table

 

We added a few wrinkles into the 2017 skit, adding a user into a character role and having live audience and live stream attendee participation. Once the votes were counted, we narrowed the field down to our two finalist.

Our first finalist, Lord Percy, delivered a highly compelling presentation of all the new capabilities in SOLIDWORKS to handle large assembly design.

Can now set multiple objects to resolved in Large Design Review

 

Ability to turn off graphics (scenery) data

 

Revert all data back to graphics to increase performance.

 

Ability to insert and mate graphics components

 

Our second finalist, Billy Bob, took the stage and amazed the audience presenting Generative Design for SOLIDWORKS.

Part of the SIMULATION Product Family

 

Multiple Objective support

 

Manufacturing Controls

 

Complete SOLIDWORKS Integration with SIMULATION View

 

As the voting came to completion live on stage, it was a tie between Lord Percy (Large Assembly Performance) and Billy Bob (Generative Design). Shortly after, final results showed Lord Percy became the SOLIDWORKS Next Top Modeler with 52 percent of the vote.

As a reminder, everything shown at SOLIDWORKS WORLD and in this blog is a TECHNOLOGY PREVIEW and new functionality is always changing until fully vetted and not guaranteed to be in the next release.

Author information

Kurt Anliker
Kurt Anliker
Kurt is the Director of Product Introduction at Dassault Systemes SOLIDWORKS

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SOLIDWORKS World 2017 Day Two Recap: The Best Community in CAD http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/solidworks-world-2017-day-two-recap-best-community-cad.html http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/2017/02/solidworks-world-2017-day-two-recap-best-community-cad.html#respond Wed, 08 Feb 2017 00:42:16 +0000 http://blogs.solidworks.com/solidworksblog/?p=31826
From students and experts to entrepreneurs and makers, the SOLIDWORKS community is like no other. Day two at #SWW17 was proof of the fact.

Author information

SOLIDWORKS

Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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In case the title wasn’t clear, day two at SOLIDWORKS World is dedicated to the SOLIDWORKS community,but before we dive into the proceedings, let’s quickly recap day one:

You can read more about day one in this blog post.

SOLIDWORKS Vice President of Strategy and Community Suchit Jain kicked off day two with some impressive community updates. Comprised of millions of users, the SOLIDWORKS community is extremely diverse. This group is passionate about engineering, design and helping each other. This video speaks volumes about the best community in CAD.

One way users can make the most of their experience using SOLIDWORKS is to become a certified user. Currently, there are 222,000 certified users worldwide including an elite group of 2,800 Certified SOLIDWORKS Experts (CSWE). Learn more about certification here.

Suchit’s presentation highlighted key categories of users from students and experts to entrepreneurs and makers. It’s SOLIDWORKS’ responsibility to provide the community with the tools, training and skills to advance careers, build businesses and enable the new, the next and the never before to become a reality.

Students

Tyler Wooten is a student enrolled at Texas A&M University. During his freshman year, Tyler became involved with Startup Aggieland, an incubator-style learning program where students and alumni can learn how to create successful startups. His experience led him to launch a non-profit aimed at assisting visually impaired students navigate Texas A&M University’s campus with help from 3D campus maps. Tyler recently became a Certified SOLIDWORKS Associate, which opens up employment opportunities upon graduation.

Experts

As previously mentioned, CSWEs are the pinnacle of SOLIDWORKS users. Eric Spendlove, Acrobatic Rigger and Designer at Cirque Du Soleil, is part of this elite squad. Eric uses the skills he mastered during the certification process every day at his job in Las Vegas.

Entrepreneurs

The SOLIDWORKS Entrepreneur program is focused on democratization of innovation. Fledgling businesses that apply and are accepted into the program receive free access to design tools, designers, experts and fellow entrepreneurs to help them along in their business journey. Accelerators and incubators are important partners in the entrepreneurial process. One such incubator is Greentown Labs, the largest green tech incubator in the United States.

Makers

The bar for people to create products is lower than ever thanks to advances in 3D printing, design software and the rise in maker spaces. SOLIDWORKS partners with the Fab Foundation  can be found in the more than 1,000 Fab Labs worldwide. In addition, there are 6,000 maker spaces in the world where aspiring artists, designers, engineers and entrepreneurs meet to create. SOLIDWORKS is dedicated to being a key contributor to this maker movement.

SOLIDWORKS user Jonathan Tippet began his career in maker spaces. Jonathan creates amazing creatures that mix artistry, science and SOLIDWORKS. His latest project, the Prosthesis anti-robot, is a human-piloted mech that you can actually see in person in the SWW17 Product Showcase.

Partners are a major contributor to the SOLIDWORKS community. We have more than 750 solution partners who compliment SOLIDWORKS and expand capabilities to help users create the best possible products. Suchit stressed recent work to push the boundaries of design with augmented and virtual reality partnerships with companies like HTC, NVIDIA, and Lenovo to bring these innovations to SOLIDWORKS.

To demonstrate Sid Palaniappan, SOLIDWORKS Senior Manager Graphics R&D Deployment, took the stage and walked the audience through a massive construction vehicle model from SOLIDWORKS user Resemin in a virtual reality environment using the HTC Vibe. Using the technology you can see the sheer scale of the model, get into the driver’s seat and virtually pull out any component!

The SOLIDWORKS community is everywhere and the best place to connect with fellow users virtually is at MySolidWorks. Suchit presented two new services to MySolidWorks that users can take advantage of now: Online Product Trials and eCourses, featuring full instructor-led online training that you can do at your own pace. You can read more about the news here. One million users connected took advantage of MySolidWorks last year – it is an excellent tool for support, training, and engaging with fellow users.

SOLIDWORKS Education Update

2.7 million students are currently using SOLIDWORKS Education and Marie Planchard, Director of Education & Early Engagement, is always hustling to meet with students and mentors at schools, universities, and competitions around the world. Marie and the Education team are committed to providing the tools to make amazing technologies that emerge from education and research possible.

Marie highlighted several educational users including a team at Waseda University who are creating search and rescue robots to navigate disaster sites. Marie also discussed how users grow with the software and use their own experience to start businesses. One example is Erin Winick, founder of Sci-Chic, a science-themed jewelry business that makes engineering fashionable. Erin learned SOLIDWORKS in school and designs her products in the software. Sci-Chic is one of the newest members of the SOLIDWORKS Entrepreneur Program.

Dos Pueblos Engineering Academy is a high school using SOLIDWORKS to support its mission to transform education. Dos Pueblos Founder and Director Amir Abo-Shaeer and Mechatronics Teacher and Director of Information Technology Lyle Harlow joined the stage to share their passion for learning.

Dos Pueblos was founded upon the idea of creating an exciting and enriching community with a passion for learning and thirst for knowledge. The school takes a STEAM approach to education: Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Manufacturing. Students learn to use SOLIDWORKS from day one and will leave school prepared for higher education or trades with four years of hands-on experience with machining. Another interesting aspect of Dos Pueblos is the inclusion of art. Artistry will continue to be important in any product. Dos Pueblos believes that mixing art and science enables students to have experience with multiple disciplines. Currently, 400 students are enrolled at the Dos Pueblos Engineering Academy and 50 percent are female!

SOLIDWORKS is well established in schools, but a goal is to push for more exposure to kids. The goal is to peek interest in engineering at an earlier age. Last year, Chin-Loo Lama, SOLIDWORKS Senior User Experience Manager, introduced the SOLIDWORKS Apps for Kids private beta program. Today, she announced that the Apps for Kids beta program is now available to the public. You can learn more about the news here. Chin-Loo also previewed two interesting future Apps for Kids features: Game It, which lets you place your designs in a gaming environment (it feels a bit like a mix between Asteroids and Galaga) and Print It, which enables you to print models your models in 3D anywhere in the world.

The SOLIDWORKS User Group Network (SWUGN) consists of 293 user groups in 38 countries dedicated to educating peers and providing networking opportunities for SOLIDWORKS users. Completely user-driven, SWUGN is an invaluable resource to the community. Today, the SWUGN Oscars Awards for User Leader of the Year, User Group of the Year and the Michelle Pillers Community Award were bestowed upon to these AMAZING users:

Next up rocket scientists Brian Zias, SOLIDWORKS Senior Technical Sales Manager, and Chris McQuin, Motiv Senior Electro-Mechanical Robotics Engineer, took the stage ready to “rocket.” Motiv is heavily involved with the Mars 2020 project, which is sending a rover to Mars. Chris shared perspectives on the complexities of designing for Mars exploration, including simulating for a thermal environment that fluctuates 200 degrees Celsius. Motiv also designs robots for earth, especially in the area of disaster recovery. After the Fukushima nuclear power disaster, the team was determined to help avoid secondary disasters like this in the future. How? Build robots capable of completing human tasks in areas not safe for humans. The robot, called the Robosimian, can climb rubble piles and autonomously scale walls!

Day two was action packed, but there was still one major highlight and first for SOLIDWORKS World: a combat robotics competition called the Robo Rumble! The rumble featured four teams: Fast Electric Robots, The Beaumonsters, Least Worst Robotics and Team Bad Kitty were all front and center ,slugging it out for the crown. Each team is part of the National Robotics League, an organization dedicated to promoting interest in manufacturing careers. Special guest commentators and judges were also called to preside over the event including BattleBots veterans Donald Hutson, Marc DeVits and Paul Ventimiglia. Donald has 20 years of robotics competitions under his belt and is creator of championship bot LockJaw, Paul engineered 2015 champion Bite Force, and Marc designed Icewave and uses SOLIDWORKS in his day job as CTO of Double Robotics. The three Robo Rumble rounds were fierce, but Team Fast Electric Robots won the day and the crown.

Day two was packed wall to wall with excitement and it’s not over yet. Expect more fireworks at the special event at Paramount Studios. If you’re not in Los Angeles, don’t forget you can stream day three live at 8:15 AM PST and see what’s next in SOLIDWORKS. Sign up and view here: http://sww17.wavecast.io/

 

Author information

SOLIDWORKS
Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp. offers complete 3D software tools that let you create, simulate, publish, and manage your data. SolidWorks products are easy to learn and use, and work together to help you design products better, faster, and more cost-effectively. The SolidWorks focus on ease-of-use allows more engineers, designers and other technology professionals than ever before to take advantage of 3D in bringing their designs to life.

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